Category Archives: Boeing

Boeing delivers a record number of airliners in 2015

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Boeing (Chicago, Seattle and Charleston) delivered 762 commercial airplanes in 2015, 39 more than the previous year and most ever for the company as it enters its centennial year.

In 2015, Boeing recorded 768 net orders, valued at $112.4 billion at current list prices. At year end, Boeing held 5,795 unfilled orders from customers worldwide.

In addition to the orders and deliveries, the company marked a number of other milestones in 2015:

  • Five customers received their first 787 Dreamliners, including Royal Air Maroc, Scoot, American Airlines, KLM Royal Dutch Airlines and Vietnam Airlines
  • The 747 team delivered the 100th 747-8, the 767 program received its largest single order ever from FedEx and the 777 program announced a 2 percent fuel improvement package
  • The newly expanded Seattle Delivery Center opened its doors to pave the way for increased 737 production
  • The first 737 MAX rolled out of the factory in December
  • The 787-10 team completed detailed design of the newest member of the 787 family, while the 777X reached firm configuration, allowing the team to begin detailed design of parts, assemblies and other systems for the airplane

Orders, deliveries and unfilled orders as of Dec. 31, 2015, by program were as follows:

Boeing Orders Chart

Boeing’s statement on U.S. Federal Aviation Administration settlement

Boeing (Chicago, Seattle and Charleston) issued the following statement following the settlement announcement by the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration:

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Boeing appreciates the dedication of both the Federal Aviation Administration and Boeing personnel who worked to reach the agreement announced on December 22. This agreement reflects Boeing’s deep and shared commitment to safety, quality and compliance – a commitment that has helped make travel on large commercial airplanes the safest means of transportation in history.

Boeing believes that this agreement not only fairly resolves announced and potential civil penalty actions – most of which date back years, and two of which were previously announced in 2012 and 2013 – but also will further enhance Boeing’s self-correcting quality and compliance systems. Under the terms of the agreement, Boeing has agreed to pay $12 million and make additional quality and compliance process improvements. Many of the improvements listed in the agreement have already been implemented or are in the process of implementation.

As a company we take responsibility for our actions, and we will never compromise on our commitment to quality and compliance – a commitment that is one of the core reasons we build the best airplanes in the world. We are actively working on the areas identified in the agreement and see this as another way to continually improve our compliance system.

Previously the FAA issued this statement on December 22:

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The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Aviation Administration today announced a comprehensive settlement agreement with Boeing Commercial Airplanes (BCA) that resolves multiple pending and potential enforcement cases.

Under the agreement, BCA pledged to implement and improve several certification processes to further enhance the airworthiness and continued compliance of all BCA products.

“It is imperative that everyone complies with our aviation system’s high safety standards,” said U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx. “This agreement is an important step toward ensuring that Boeing fully meets all applicable compliance standards going forward.”

“Compliance requires all certificate holders to develop and implement internal controls that ensure they’re operating according to the highest standards,” said FAA Administrator Michael Huerta. “Boeing has agreed to implement improvements in its design, planning, production and maintenance planning processes, and has already implemented several of these improvements.”

BCA’s obligations commit the company to meeting specific performance targets. They are designed to enhance BCA’s early discovery and self-disclosure of potential regulatory compliance problems, as well as the timely development and implementation of effective corrective actions.

The company also must make an immediate payment to the United States Treasury in the amount of $12 million and faces stiff penalties for failing to follow through on its commitments.

BCA’s obligations include:

Improved Management Oversight and Accountability

  • Implement the Safety Management Systems (SMS) plan BCA has developed to meet internationally accepted standards, throughout the company’s activities.
  • Use the FAA’s safety analysis modeling, in addition to BCA’s proprietary risk modeling, to assess all identified compliance issues.
  • Comply with a new Regulatory Compliance Plan, which requires BCA to assign each compliance matter to a manager-level employee for resolution and accountability.
  • Require review of the regulatory compliance performance of BCA managers.

Internal Auditing

  • To improve its internal audit processes, audit teams will be required to report directly to BCA’s Vice President of Quality, and conduct audits across all processes (Engineering, Supplier Management, Production, Modification, Repair and Customer Support) at all sites.
  • Assess the effectiveness of its internal auditing systems.
  • Appoint audit team members with appropriate technical expertise to assess the extent of regulatory compliance.
  • Conduct an evaluation of regulatory compliance procedures among different facilities and programs.
  • Implement risk-based criteria for selecting the subjects of audits.

Enhanced Supplier Management

  • To determine whether incomplete work is being accepted, conduct an initial set of audits of its suppliers, analyze the results and consult with the FAA on audit findings.
  • Based upon risk analysis, conduct a second, more extensive set of audits, again reporting the results to the FAA and providing the FAA with a summary of any corrective actions.

Quality and Timeliness Regulatory Submissions

  • Meet progressively more stringent performance metrics in the quality and timeliness of its written submissions to the FAA.

Specification Simplification

  • Annually for the next five years, review and simplify at least 15 process specifications used in the design, build, delivery and support of BCA products.

First-Article Verification

  • Implement improvements to processes to ensure that assembly installations that have been affected by process or design changes continue to conform to type design.

Stampings and Other Verification Records Accuracy

  • Conduct mandatory training of all manufacturing and quality employees who exercise stamping approval authority, and conduct recurrent training at least every 24 months.
  • Conduct mandatory training of all engineering employees on their regulatory compliance obligations.
  • During each year of the agreement, conduct at least three internal audits of each product line and at least one audit of each BCA fabrication site.
  • Prevent any repeat findings of improper stamping.

Corrective Action Development, Implementation and Sustainment

  • Apply the “Boeing Problem-Solving Model” to a wide variety of analyses that BCA submits to the FAA.
  • For future violations that the FAA identifies, conduct a second, follow-up audit within 12 months of the original incident to ensure that corrective actions were effective at the time and continue to be effective.

BCA’s Reporting Obligations

  • Report to the FAA at least annually about the effectiveness of BCA’s regulatory compliance activities, including a final and comprehensive report after the fifth year of the agreement.
  • Report to the FAA each quarter the results of any internal audits pertaining to safety management, regulatory compliance, corrective action implementation and sustainment, process compliance and conforming products.

BCA will face up to $24 million in additional penalties over the next five years if it fails to implement its obligations under the agreement.

The performance period for BCA’s commitments begins Jan. 1, 2016 and will continue for five years unless the FAA and BCA agree to an extension.

The agreement settles two initiated cases and 11 other matters that were opened during the last several years.

The first initiated case involved BCA’s tardiness in developing information for the installation of fuel tank flammability reduction equipment on Boeing 747 and 757 aircraft.

The second initiated case involved the company’s insufficient corrective action after discovering that a supplier had been providing incorrectly shaped fasteners. The FAA did not allege that these issues created unsafe conditions.

The uninitiated matters involved allegations of delays in submitting required safety information, production quality control problems, and failures to implement corrective actions for those production problems.

Boeing South Carolina rolls out the 100th 787

Boeing South Carolina rolls out the 100th 787 (Boeing)(LRW)

Boeing South Carolina marked a major milestone this week as the site’s 100th 787 Dreamliner rolled out of the factory. The airplane now begins system checks, fueling and engine runs on the flight line. The 787-8 will be delivered to American Airlines next year.

Photo: Boeing.

Boeing rolls out the first 737 MAX 8

Boeing (Chicago, Seattle and Charleston) today made this announcement of the roll out at Renton of the first Boeing 737 MAX 8:

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Today, thousands of Boeing (BA) employees in Renton, Wash., celebrated the completion of final assembly of the first 737 MAX 8.

“Today marks another in a long series of milestones that our team has achieved on time, per plan, together,” said Keith Leverkuhn, vice president and general manager, 737 MAX, Boeing Commercial Airplanes. “With the rollout of the new 737 MAX – the first new airplane of Boeing’s second century – our team is upholding an incredible legacy while taking the 737 to the next level of performance.”

The production-complete airplane rolled out of the Renton factory and into the paint hangar on Nov. 30, the precise date determined when the MAX development schedule was defined more than four years ago. Today the freshly painted 737 MAX 8, named the Spirit of Renton, was revealed to employees in a special teal version of the Boeing livery. After celebrations are complete, the airplane will undergo pre-flight preparation in the factory before departing for Renton Field to continue flight test readiness. The airplane is on track for first flight in early 2016.

With the second and third 737 MAX 8 flight test airplanes currently in final assembly and the fourth (and final) in sub-assembly, the 737 MAX remains on track for first delivery to launch customer Southwest Airlines in the third quarter of 2017.

The new single-aisle airplane will deliver 20 percent lower fuel use than the first Next-Generation 737s and the lowest operating costs: 8 percent per seat less than the A320neo.

The 737 MAX incorporates the latest technology CFM International LEAP-1B engines, Boeing-designed Advanced Technology winglets and other improvements to deliver the highest efficiency, reliability and passenger comfort in the single-aisle market. The 737 MAX 8 is the first member in Boeing’s new family of single-aisle airplanes – the 737 MAX 7, MAX 8, MAX 200 and MAX 9 – to begin production. The 737 MAX family has nearly 3,000 orders from 60 customers worldwide.

Photos: Boeing. Boeing 737 MAX 8 N8701Q (msn 42554) will eventually be delivered to launch customer Southwest Airlines.

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Boeing completes the detailed design for the 787-10 Dreamliner

Boeing (Chicago, Seattle and Charleston) has completed detailed design for the 787-10 Dreamliner, achieving another major milestone in the development of the newest and longest member of the 787 family. Boeing engineers reached the key milestone nearly two weeks ahead of schedule.

The milestone is critical to every development program because it means the information needed to build parts and tools for assembly has been completed and released for fabrication or procurement. Major assembly of the 787-10 will begin in 2016, followed by first flight in 2017 and first delivery in 2018.

As a straightforward stretch of the 787-9, which entered service in 2014, Boeing designed the 787-10 for superior efficiency as well as maximum commonality. Ninety-five percent of the design and build of the 787-10 and 787-9 will be identical, reducing complexity, cost and risk across the production system and providing operational benefits to customers.

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The 787-10 is the third and longest member of the 787 family. With a range of 6,430 nautical miles (11,910 km), the 787-10 will cover more than 90 percent of the world’s twin-aisle routes at a whole new level of fuel efficiency: 25 percent more fuel efficient than the airplanes it will replace and at least 10 percent better than anything offered by the competition for the future.

To date, the 787-10 has logged 164 orders from nine customers around the world, accounting for 14 percent of all 787 orders.

Image: Boeing.

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Boeing and BOC Aviation announce an order for 22 737-800s and 737 MAX 8s

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Boeing (BA) and BOC Aviation (Singapore), announced an order for 22 737 airplanes, building on the leasing company’s existing order book to fulfill customer demand.

The order, consisting of 11 Next-Generation 737-800s and 11 737 MAX 8 airplanes, will be posted to Boeing’s Orders and Deliveries website once finalized.

In addition to today’s announcement, BOC Aviation has ordered 167 737 airplanes, including 50 737 MAXs and 16 777s.

BOC Aviation is a leading global aircraft leasing company with a portfolio of 253 owned and managed aircraft operated by 59 airlines worldwide in 29 countries, with commitments to acquire 203 aircraft, as of 30 September 2015. BOC Aviation, owned by Bank of China, is based in Singapore with offices in Dublin, London, Seattle and Tianjin.

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Cathay Pacific takes delivery of its 70th Boeing 777 and last 777-300 ER

Cathay Pacific 777-300 B-HNR (94)(Nose-Delivery Ceremony) PAE (Boeing)(LRW)

Boeing (Chicago, Seattle and Charleston) and Cathay Pacific Airways (Hong Kong) celebrated a significant achievement with the delivery of the airline’s 70th 777 aircraft – also the last and 53rd 777-300 ER (Extended Range) of its confirmed orders – that has made Cathay Asia’s largest operator of the 777 fleet.

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With this delivery, Cathay Pacific’s 777 aircraft fleet comprises of 53 777-300 ERs, 12 777-300s and five 777-200s. The airline is one of the launch customers for the 777X with 21 777-9 airplanes on order.

Cathay Pacific took delivery of its first 777-300 ER in September 2007.

The new delivery will also help Cathay Pacific retire its remaining passenger Boeing 747-400s.

Cathay Pacific group operates flights to nearly 200 destinations worldwide with its own fleet of more than 200 aircraft.

Photo: Boeing. The pictured Boeing 777-367 ER B-HNR (msn 60724) was officially handed over on September 26.

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