Reuters: Airbus is confident it can deliver the first A350 to Qatar Airways within 10 days

Airbus (Toulouse) is confident it can prepare the first Airbus A350-900 for delivery to launch customer Qatar Airways (Doha) within 10 days according to this report by Reuters.

The original delivery ceremony was scheduled for December 13.

Read the full report: CLICK HERE

Copyright Photo: Eurospot/AirlinersGallery.com. The first delivery A350, the pictured A350-941 F-WZFA (msn 006) will become A7-ALA on the handover, whenever that occurs.

Qatar Airways aircraft slide show:

London ATC goes down temporarily

LHR (9-04)(Aerial)(KDB)(LRW)

Dozens of flights to and from Heathrow airport were delayed or cancelled due to a power outage at air traffic control, European air traffic control authority Eurocontrol said on Friday. London airspace was briefly closed.

Heathrow, which is the UK’s busiest airport, reported earlier: “There is a power outage at the NATS control center in Swanwick which is affecting UK airspace.”

“Flights are currently experiencing delays. We will update passengers as soon as we have more information.”

London Gatwick, Stansted and Luton Airports are accepting arrivals but have suspended departures.

A number of flights were held over the English Channel.

Manchester Airport meanwhile says it is unaffected by the airspace closure and claims it is ready to accept any London bound diverted flights..

London airspace has been effectively closed until 7pm due to a power outage at a control centre.

People travelling have been warned to expect severe delays.

NATs have said: “We can confirm that a technical problem has been reported at Swanwick air traffic control centre. We apologise for any delays and our incident response team has been mobilised. Every possible action is being taken to assist in resolving the situation and to confirm the details. Further information will be released as it becomes available.”

The state-of-the art centre at Swanwick has been subject to a number of computer glitches since Nats moved there from its old headquarters in West Drayton in west London in the early part of the last decade.

One of the worst problems was a year ago – on Saturday December 7 2013 – when thousands of passengers were left stranded when hundreds of flights were grounded following a technical fault at the Hampshire centre.

Read the analysis by Bloomberg Businessweek: CLICK HERE

Report by Assistant Editor Oliver Wilcock from Manchester.

Top Copyright Photo: Keith Burton/AirlinersGallery.com. An aerial photo of London Heathrow Airport.

Bottom Image: SPA. A rare radar image – no flights airborne over the London area during the ground stop.

London Radar

Embraer delivers the 1,100 E-Jet

AeroMexico connect ERJ 190-100 XA-GAW (06-110 E-Jets)(Grd) MEX (Embraer)(LRW)

Embraer delivered the 1,100th E-Jet production aircraft on December 10 during a ceremony held in the AeroMexico hangar, at the Benito Juárez International Airport, in Mexico City. The aircraft, an ERJ 190 model, is also the 200th aircraft from the E-Jet family flying in Latin America.

AeroMexico operates a fleet of 62 Embraer jets through its regional brand and subsidiary, AeroMexico Connect (Aerolitoral): 27 ERJ 190s, six ERJ 170s, three ERJ 175s, and 26 ERJ 145s.

The first delivery of an E -Jet in Latin America occurred in 2005. Currently, eight airlines, from seven countries, operate the E-Jets in the region, where Embraer is the leader in the segment of jets up to 130 seats, with a 70% market share.

In June 2013, Embraer launched the second generation of the E-Jets family – the E-Jets E2 – the first of which is slated to enter service in 2018.

Copyright Photo: Embraer. The pictured ERJ 190-100LR XA-GAW (msn 19000679) carries a special “1100 E-Jets” emblem.

AeroMexico Connect aircraft slide show:

Randy Tinseth of Boeing counters Airbus’ claim the A321neo is a Boeing 757 replacement

3D imagery, 737 MAX, MAX, 737 MAX 7, 737 MAX8, 737 MAX 9

Randy Tinseth, the vice president of marketing for the Boeing Commercial Airplanes in Seattle responded to claims airline customers are still waiting for a true Boeing 757 replacement. Randy also countered Airbus’ claims the proposed A321neo is a 757 replacement.

Randy wrote the following on his Randy’s Journal:

There’s been a lot of talk lately about a replacement for the 757. The fact is, today’s 737 and other airplanes its size already fly 90 percent of flights that used to be operated with a 757. And in the future, that number will jump to 95 percent thanks to airplanes like the 737 MAX.

For example, take Norwegian. They recently announced plans to use the 737 MAX 8 on transatlantic routes beginning in 2017. Other large 757 operators have publicly noted their continued discussions with Boeing around airplanes for trans-Atlantic missions.

Meanwhile, Airbus claims its proposed long ranger version of the A321neo is a true 757 replacement. In reality, it falls short in two big ways. It can’t match the 757’s range, and it can’t carry as many passengers.

The 737 MAX 9 and the A321neoLR are both capable of North Atlantic range by adding auxiliary tanks, with the 737 MAX 9 flying the mission more efficiently. The A321neoLR needs three auxiliary tanks and increased takeoff weight— while the 737 MAX 9 could do the mission with just one auxiliary tank, allowing for more cargo space.

The 737 MAX is a great airplane that’s sized right for the heart of the single-aisle market— along with the right range capabilities. It’s a key part of our overall product development strategy, that along with the 777X and 787-10, is set for the next decade.

As for that space in between the upper end of the 737 and the 787-8, we continue to talk with our customers to better understand their needs in the future.

Image: Boeing. The Boeing 737 MAX 8 and MAX 9.

“Living in the Age of Airplanes” is coming in April

 

<p><a href=”http://vimeo.com/101896187″>Living in the Age of Airplanes — Trailer #1</a> from <a href=”http://vimeo.com/airplanesmovie”>Living in the Age of Airplanes</a> on <a href=”https://vimeo.com”>Vimeo</a&gt;.</p>

National Geographic Studios has acquired the global theatrical rights to the film “Living in the Age of Airplanes,” which takes audiences on an epic journey through 18 countries and across all seven continents as it presents a unique perspective on how the airplane has changed the world. It will be available to 15/70 flat and dome film screens and to all digital screens when it is released worldwide on April 10, 2015.

Produced and directed by Brian J. Terwilliger (“One Six Right”), “Living in the Age of Airplanes” is narrated by actor and pilot Harrison Ford and features an original score by Academy Award®-winning composer and pilot James Horner (“Avatar,” “Titanic”). The film was shot in 95 locations around the globe, from remote places like the South Pole and the Maldives to historically significant sites of ancient civilizations. The narrative weaves together the profound ways that aviation has transformed our lives, connecting countries and cultures while expanding horizons and minds.

“Since we were all born into a world with airplanes, it’s hard to imagine that jet travel itself is only 60 years old, just a tick on the timeline of human history,” said Terwilliger. “Yet practically overnight, our perception of crossing continents and oceans at 500 mph has turned from fascination to frustration. I want to reignite people’s wonder for one of the most extraordinary aspects of the modern world.”

“‘Living in the Age of Airplanes’ is the perfect film for National Geographic,” said Mark Katz, president of distribution for National Geographic Studios. “Its visuals are breathtaking, it tells an amazing story and will engage audiences on a variety of levels, from adventure to geography to exploration and more, which aligns completely with National Geographic’s mission to inspire, illuminate and teach.”

The ordeal of United Airlines flight UA 863 to Australia

United flight UA863 (Catherine Devine)(LR)

United Airlines (Chicago) flight UA 863 from San Francisco to Sydney did go as planned. That is an understatement for the 251 passengers on board the flight.

The aircraft, a Boeing 777-200 ER, after the long flight from San Francisco to Sydney was diverted to Canberra due to debris on the runway at Sydney. The runway at SYD was closed for only 35 minutes but two United aircraft were on reserve fuel and had to divert. The flight when it was arrived at Canberra was unable to process its passengers by Customs and Immigration because they were unavailable to process the passengers at the mainly domestic airport. The flight crew also was out of legal flying time. The passengers were stuck on the tarmac for 7 hours. Some passengers had been traveling for over 30 hours.

Read the full account from ABC News: CLICK HERE

Read the passenger accounts on #UA863: CLICK HERE

Top Twitter Photo by Catherine Devine: Passengers were feed on the tarmac.

United Airlines aircraft slide show (current livery): AG Slide Show

WestJet and Delta announce a frequent flyer agreement

WestJet (Calgary) has announced a reciprocal frequent flyer agreement with Delta Air Lines (Atlanta) , a code-share partner with WestJet since 2012.

The agreement allows WestJet Rewards members to earn WestJet dollars on flights marketed and operated by Delta Air Lines, with access to Delta’s extensive global network of more than 300 destinations on six continents.

In addition to the new accrual agreement, WestJet now also offers WestJet Rewards members the ability to use WestJet dollars on all code-share flights marketed by WestJet and operated by Delta. The two airlines will continue to work together to expand their relationship even further, including the introduction of full reciprocal redemption in the coming year that will allow members to redeem for destinations beyond WestJet’s current network.

Copyright Photo: Eddie Maloney/AirlinersGallery.com. Boeing 737-8CT C-GWBU (msn 39075) of Westjet with Aviation Partners Boeing Split Scimitar Winglets arrives in Las Vegas.

WestJet aircraft slide show: AG Slide Show