Tag Archives: Airbus A330

Delta’s new Airbus A330-300 takeoff video

Delta Air Lines (Atlanta) has issued this new video and description written by Rachel Solomon:

Delta logo

By Rachel Solomon

Mojave, California – With 10 state-of-the-art A330 Airbus airplanes joining Delta’s fleet over the next two years, the airline saw an opportunity to tell a story of an innovative aircraft.

And how Delta Marketing told that story was just as cutting edge.

Equipped with top-notch technology, the A330-300 can fly farther while consuming less fuel than its predecessors. It also features best-in-class onboard features, including flat-bed seats and premium entertainment, reflecting Delta’s efforts to provide a superior customer experience.

The advanced A330 – with the new, sleek Delta logo painted on its belly – demanded a more dynamic video than in the past. So Marketing, in combination with Atlanta-based firm Pouya Creative, embarked on a months-long plan to produce dramatic images that let viewers get up close and personal with the belly-logo livery just as the A330 takes off.

How did the team do it? Thirty-five cameras, nine months of planning and one camera-rigged Porsche driving 160 mph just 200 feet below the plane.

“What would up the ante?”

The project started with Mauricio Parise, Director – Marketing Communications, in January.

“We have great footage showcasing our new 737-900,” Parise said. “But to represent ourselves as the global airline we are, we needed to film a widebody plane like this new A330-300, which flies across the globe.”

Then Delta’s Visual Content leads Mary Welsh, Manager – Brand Strategy and Creative Services, and Chris Fisher, Specialist – Art Direction and Graphic Design, and Pouya Creative teams took it from there.

The plan was to capture a dramatic shot of the belly logo just as the plane was taking off. To do that, the team would need a camera that could be attached to something moving as fast as the plane – say, a Porsche 911. The camera, wedged in the back seat, would need to be wireless and controlled remotely to ensure perfect-angle shots.

Meanwhile, a smaller Learjet and a helicopter would provide aerial shots to show other angles of the A330.

Last year, Delta used a Learjet and a helicopter to film a brand new Boeing 737, but filming in this manner – not only from aircraft but a sports car – took the project to the next level.

“We asked ourselves, ‘What would up the ante?’ this time,” said Pouya Dianat, Project Director and Director of Pouya Creative. “Delta loyalists crave unique perspectives, and we wanted to live up to that.”

Over the next several months, the team recruited all the right people for the job, including Delta employees from Flight Operations, Technical Operations and the Operations/Customer Center, as well as videographers and a professional stunt driver.

“Safety my first concern”

What started out as an artistic idea became a matter of engineering precision and skill. Using Airbus performance software, Cory White, Delta Senior Engineer – Performance Aircraft, figured out the exact calculations to ensure the Porsche-rigged camera could film the underside of the plane clearly and safely.

“I was excited to be involved in such a unique opportunity, but safety was my first concern,” White said. “It’s a heavy burden to make sure calculations are done properly. Checking and rechecking was essential.”

“Delta loyalists crave unique perspectives, and we wanted to live up to that.”

White calculated the effect of temperature and wind on the performance of the Airbus and the acceleration of the Porsche to determine the appropriate distance between the plane and the car, as well as timing of takeoff.
Then, the team put White’s calculations to the test.

Weeks prior to the shoot, the film crew and Delta’s flight team performed more than a dozen practice runs in both the car and a flight simulator. Testing continued during the shoot; Captain Dan Lewis, Delta Chief Line Check Pilot for the A330, and First Officer Robin Grey conducted two trial takeoffs in the A330.

“We’ll need to validate where the plane leaves the ground and have clear range signals worked out ahead of time,” Lewis said in one of several safety meetings. “What we have to do is plan for the worst.”

“Plane in my rearview mirror”

The teams met in September at the Mojave Air and Space Port, an arid location an hour-and-a-half northeast of Los Angeles. The production team had grown to more than 50 people, including pilots and co-pilots, cameramen, audio and video technicians, production crew members and security. After months of planning, everything began to come together.

The crew spent day one reviewing details of the shoot, establishing safety protocols and filming still photos of the A330, which had just landed from Atlanta that afternoon.

“We had a check list of things we needed from each part of the crew in order to be successful,” Dianat said. “It took the safety of the aerial film crews, the precision of the driver and pilots, and camera and wireless operations.”

On day two, the team reconvened at sunrise. Outside of a hangar, a helicopter circled above to capture the perfect shot of the A330 taxiing towards the rust-red Mojave Desert Mountains. The team performed its final test runs before shooting the groundbreaking scene that afternoon.

The A330 lined up on the runway behind the Porsche. Dianat gave the go-ahead, and the Porsche sped off with the A330 shortly following.

“Seeing the plane come up in my rearview mirror was unforgettable,” said Roger Richman, the professional stunt driver. “I’ve been chased by a lot of things, but never anything as large, or with first class seating! But I was amazed at the precision and consistency of these Delta pilots – I would trust my life with those guys.”

“The results are powerful. It really helps bring the brand to life in a differentiated way by showcasing a brand-new aircraft that symbolizes our global scope.”

After four takeoffs, the crew had the shots it needed and wrapped for the day. The following day was spent shooting the A330’s exterior from all angles by Learjet and helicopter.
In all, the team edited more than four hours of footage down to a 60-second spot.

Parise said the most challenging part of the project – aside from the desert heat – was pulling off a project that required coordination across many different teams – internal and external.

“The results are powerful,” Parise said. “It really helps bring the brand to life in a differentiated way by showcasing a brand-new aircraft that symbolizes our global scope.”

About the A330-300

It’s a quieter, more eco-efficient widebody aircraft that operates long-haul flights. Delta took delivery of its first in May.

Passengers: 293
Crusing speed: 531 mph
Range: 5343 miles

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Former Monarch Airlines Airbus A330-200 finds a new home

Flynas (Nasair) (Saudi Arabia)(Eaglexpress Air Charter) Airbus A330-243 G-SMAN (9M-AZL) (msn 261) BHX (Ian Bowley). Image: 930023.

Monarch Airlines’ former Airbus A330-243 G-SMAN (msn 261) has found a new home. G-SMAN arrived back at Birmingham from Cambridge after repainting. The airliner will become 9M-AZL
with Eaglexpress Air Charter who will operate it on behalf of flynas.

Copyright Photo: Ian Bowley/AirlinersGallery.com.

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Eurowings to fly the Cologne/Bonn – Miami route

The first Airbus A330 for Eurowings

Eurowings (Dusseldorf) has announced it will begin service from Miami International Airport to Cologne/Bonn — Germany’s fourth-largest destination — beginning on May 1, 2016. The airline’s first-ever Miami service will operate three weekly flights using 310-seat Airbus A330 aircraft, which feature 21 premium seats and 289 in economy. The route will mark MIA’s third German carrier, after Lufthansa and Airberlin; its fifth German destination, along with Berlin, Dusseldorf, Frankfurt and Munich; and its 20th European destination.

Miami-Cologne flights will operate on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Sundays, with inbound flights scheduled to arrive in Miami at 4:10 p.m. and scheduled departures to Cologne at 5:55 p.m.

Eurowings is part of the Lufthansa Group.

Copyright Photo: Gerd Beilfuss/AirlinersGallery.com. Airbus A330-203 B-16301 (later D-AXGA) (msn 530) arrives at Hamburg.

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TAP Portugal orders 14 Airbus A330-900neo and 39 A320neo Family airliners

TAP Portugal A330-900neo (05)(Flt)(Airbus)(LRW)

TAP Portugal has signed a firm order with Airbus for 53 Widebody and single aisle aircraft including 14 A330-900neo, and 39 A320neo Family aircraft (15 A320neos and 24 A321neos). The aircraft will join TAP Portugal’s fleet as part of its fleet renewal announced by the airline’s new majority owner Atlantic Gateway. As part of the agreement, TAP Portugal is replacing its previous order of 12 A350-900s with the A330-900neo.

TAP Portugal is an all Airbus customer, currently operating 43 A320 Family aircraft and 18 Widebody Family aircraft.

The A330-800neo and the A330-900neo are two new members of the Airbus Widebody Family launched in July 2014 with first deliveries scheduled to start in Q4 2017.

Image: Airbus.

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Azul launches a new route from Belo Horizonte to Orlando

Azul's 2015 "Azul Viagens" special livery

Azul Brazilian Airlines, Brazil’s largest airline by cities served, yesterday (November 16) added a new daily flight from Orlando International to Belo Horizonte, Brazil, the first-ever nonstop flight on the route. Belo Horizonte is Azul’s second hub destination, where Orlando travelers will be able to connect to more than 100 destinations. The company also operates daily flights from Fort Lauderdale/Hollywood and Orlando to São Paulo. Azul Cargo services are available in all international flights.

The new daily service will depart Orlando (MCO) at 6 pm (1800), arriving in Belo Horizonte at 5:32 am (0532) the following morning. The return flight will depart Belo Horizonte at 10:18 am (1018), arriving at MCO at 4:15 pm (1615).

Copyright Photo: Andy Cripps/AirlinersGallery.com. Airbus A330-243 PR-AIU (msn 494) in the special Azul Viagens livery departs from Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport (FLL).

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Air Canada and the flight attendant union reach a tentative agreement

Air Canada (Montreal) has issued this statement:

Air Canada logo-1

Air Canada and the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE) have announced they have reached a new agreement, subject to ratification, on collective agreement terms for ten years for the approximately 6,500 flight attendants at Air Canada and 700 at Air Canada rouge.

“This new, ten-year agreement with CUPE is an important development which will support long term profitable growth for the benefit of Air Canada, our stakeholders and our flight attendants at both mainline and Air Canada rouge,” said Benjamin Smith , President, Passenger Airlines, Air Canada. “This is a win-win agreement that will provide added stability and flexibility while acknowledging the important contribution of our flight attendants towards Air Canada’s future success. As the fifth collective agreement reached with unions representing our employees over the past year, it is further indication of the collaborative partnership that is building Air Canada into a Global Champion.”

“We are pleased that the company has agreed to many key improvements to our current collective agreement, including much-needed provisions on job security amongst other important gains. Following many months of hard work at the bargaining table, the eight members of our bargaining committee are unanimous in their joint endorsement of this tentative agreement. We look forward to a sustained period of growth at Air Canada. Our company’s global expansion in the months and years ahead will be mutually beneficial, and will have a tremendously positive impact on our membership,” said Michel Cournoyer , President, CUPE Airline Division.

The agreement is subject to ratification by CUPE’s membership as well as to certain openers over the 10 year period. Details of the agreement will not be released pending ratification by CUPE and approval by the Air Canada Board of Directors.

The union will recommend ratification to its members and the Company will seek the Air Canada Board of Directors’ approval for the agreement promptly.

This agreement with CUPE, subject to ratification, follows on the conclusion in October 2014 of a new agreement with Air Canada’s 3,000 pilots on collective agreement terms for ten years. It is the fifth collective agreement reached by Air Canada and its unions, including those with Unifor representing the airline’s 4,000 Customer Service and Sales Agents in Canada , the International Brotherhood of Teamsters (IBT) representing its U.S. unionized workforce and UNITE representing its U.K unionized workforce.

Copyright Photo: Chris Sands/AirlinersGallery.com. Airbus A330-343 C-GHKW (msn 408) is seen in action at a snowy Calgary.

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Eurowings’ Airbus A330-203 D-AXGA arrives in Palma de Mallorca without its left engine panel

Eurowings (Dusseldorf) first Airbus A330-203 D-AXGA (msn 530), operated on behalf of Germanwings (2nd) (Cologne/Bonn) and performing flight 4U592 from Cologne/Bonn (Germany) to Palma de Mallorca (Spain) with 169 passengers and 13 crew, departed Cologne’s runway 14L when the engine access doors of the left hand engine (CF6) opened, separated and came to rest in the first third of the runway. The crew continued the flight and in absence of abnormal indications landed in Palma Mallorca without further incident about 2 hours later.

The airline confirmed that parts of the engine cowling separated, there were no abnormal indications, the crew received information when the aircraft was over southern France and continued the flight to Palma Mallorca. Lufthansa Technik as well as Germany’s BFU are investigating as to why the parts separated.

Germany’s BFU confirmed they were informed about the separation of parts of the cowling of the left hand engine and are currently undertaking a technical examination in coordination with Spain’s CIAIAC.

The Deutsche Flugsicherung (DFS), Germany’s ATC provider, reported that tower did not observe parts separating from the engine, the parts were later reported by another crew, collected in a runway inspection and identified, which took about 45 minutes. The crew was informed about the parts of engine cowling having been found when the aircraft was over southern France about one hour after departure.

Assistant Editor Javier Rodriguez reporting from Palma de Mallorca.

Copyright Photo: Javier Rodriguez.

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