Tag Archives: Asiana Airlines

Asiana to launch the Seoul – Astana route

Asiana Airlines (Seoul) has announced it will commence twice-weekly service between Seoul (Incheon) and Astana, the capital of Kazakhstan, on August 8. The new route will be served with Airbus A330-300 and Boeing 767-300 aircraft.

Copyright Photo: Yuji Wang/AirlinersGallery.com. Airbus A330-323 HL7792 (msn 1001) approaches the runway at Shanghai (Hongqiao), China.

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Breaking news: Asiana Airlines flight OZ 162 veers off the runway at Hiroshima

Asiana Airlines (Seoul) flight OZ 162 made a hard landing and veered off the side of the runway tonight (April 14) while landing at Hiroshima, Japan on a flight from Seoul (Incheon). Reportedly 23 people received minor injuries according to CNN. The AIrbus A320-232 (HL7762, msn 3244) (above) was carrying 74 passengers and seven crew members.

According to The Guardian the A320 hit the localizer on the approach. The tail also hit the runway on landing.

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Read the full report by The Guardian: CLICK HERE

Read the full report by the International Business Times: CLICK HERE

Top Copyright Photo: Michael B. Ing/AirlinersGallery.com. HL7762 arrives at Beijing prior to this accident.

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Asiana Airlines to launch a second budget airline, tentatively named “Seoul Air”

Asiana Airlines (Seoul-Incheon) according to the The Korea Herald is planning to launch a second budget airline, tentatively named “Seoul Air”. The new entity would take over the short, less profitable international routes the main carrier now flies with narrow body aircraft.

Read the full story: CLICK HERE

Copyright Photo: Michael B. Ing/AirlinersGallery.com. Air Busan is 46 percent owned by Asiana. Air Busan operates only from the city of Busan. Air Busan Airbus A321-231 HL7723 (msn 2045) arrives in Tokyo (Narita).

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Asiana signs LOI for 25 Airbus A321neo aircraft

Asiana A321neo (06)(Flt)(Airbus)(LRW)

Asiana Airlines (Seoul) has signed a Letter of Intent (LOI) with Airbus for the purchase of 25 180-seat A321neo single aisle aircraft as part of its ongoing fleet modernization program.

The A321neo will join an existing fleet of A320 Family aircraft operated by Asiana Airlines and its low cost subsidiary Air Busan, with the A321 set to become the primary single aisle type at both units.

Asiana Airlines currently operates 33 Airbus singe aisle aircraft, 15 widebody A330-300s and two double deck A380s. In addition to its newly announced commitment for the A321neo, the airline has outstanding orders for four more A380s and 30 all-new A350 XWBs for operation on its long haul network.

Meanwhile, Air Busan currently operates nine A320 Family aircraft on its domestic and regional services.

Image: Airbus.

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Asiana Airlines to bring the Airbus A380 to New York JFK

Asiana Airlines (Seoul) will assign the Airbus A380 to the Seoul (Incheon) – New York (JFK) route starting on June 13 per Airline Route. As of July 14, the route will be exclusively operated with Airbus A380s.

Copyright Photo: Michael B. Ing/AirlinersGallery.com. Airbus A380-841 HL7625 (msn 152) arrives in Los Angeles.

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Asiana to add the Airbus A380 on the Seoul-Los Angeles route now on August 20

Asiana Airlines (Seoul-Incheon) has moved forward the start of Airbus A380 service on the route to Los Angeles to August 20, instead of August 26 per Airline Route.

Copyright Photo: Gerd Beilfuss/AirlinersGallery.com.

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NTSB: “Asiana flight 214 crashed when the airplane descended below the visual glidepath due to the flight crew’s mismanagement of the approach and inadequate monitoring of airspeed.”

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) (Washington) yesterday (June 24) issued its probable cause and report on the July 6, 2013 crash of Asiana Airlines (Seoul) flight 214 with the pictured Boeing 777-28E ER HL7742 (msn 29171) at San Francisco. Here is the full statement and link:

In a Board meeting held on June 24, 2014, the National Transportation Safety Board determined that Asiana flight 214 crashed when the airplane descended below the visual glidepath due to the flight crew’s mismanagement of the approach and inadequate monitoring of airspeed. The Board also found that the complexities of the auto throttle and autopilot flight director systems, and the crew’s misunderstanding of those systems, contributed to the accident.

On July 6, 2013, about 11:28 a.m. (PDT), the Boeing 777 was on approach to runway 28L at San Francisco International Airport in San Francisco, California when it struck the seawall at the end of the runway. Three of the 291 passengers died; 40 passengers, eight of the 12 flight attendants, and one of the four flight crewmembers received serious injuries. The other 248 passengers, four flight attendants, and three flight crewmembers received minor injuries or were not injured. The impact forces and a postcrash fire destroyed the airplane.

The NTSB determined that the flight crew mismanaged the initial approach and that the airplane was well above the desired glidepath as it neared the runway. In response to the excessive altitude, the captain selected an inappropriate autopilot mode and took other actions that, unbeknownst to him, resulted in the autothrottle no longer controlling airspeed.

As the airplane descended below the desired glidepath, the crew did not notice the decreasing airspeed nor did they respond to the unstable approach. The flight crew began a go-around maneuver when the airplane was below 100 feet, but it was too late and the airplane struck the seawall.

“In this accident, the flight crew over-relied on automated systems without fully understanding how they interacted,” said NTSB Acting Chairman Christopher A. Hart. “Automation has made aviation safer. But even in highly automated aircraft, the human must be the boss.”

As a result of this accident investigation, the NTSB made recommendations to the Federal Aviation Administration, Asiana Airlines, The Boeing Company, the Aircraft Rescue and Firefighting Working Group, and the City of San Francisco.

These recommendations address the safety issues identified in the investigation, including the need for reinforced adherence to Asiana flight crew standard operating procedures, more opportunities for manual flying for Asiana pilots, a context-dependent low energy alerting system, and both certification design review and enhanced training on the Boeing 777 autoflight system.

The recommendations also address the need for improved emergency communications, and staffing requirements and training for aircraft rescue and firefighting personnel.

“Today, good piloting includes being on the lookout for surprises in how the automation works, and taking control when needed,” Hart said. “Good design means not only maximizing reliability, but also minimizing surprises and uncertainties.”

A synopsis of the NTSB report, including the probable cause, findings, and a complete list of the 27 safety recommendations, is available at http://www.ntsb.gov/news/events/2014/asiana214/abstract.html. The full report will be available on the website in several weeks.

Copyright Photo: Michael B. Ing/AirlinersGallery.com. Boeing 777-28E ER HL7742 is pictured on approach at Los Angeles International Airport before the accident at SFO.

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