Tag Archives: Boeing 767

JAL to expand Wi-Fi service on its Boeing 767-300 ERs and 787-8 Dreamliners

Japan Airlines-JAL (Tokyo) has been introducing its in-flight Wi-Fi service since July 2012 with its Boeing 777-300 ERs. The airline will start to include Boeing 767-300 ERs and Boeing 787-8 Dreamliners to introducing its  JAL SKY Wi-Fi service on more Europe, North America and long-haul Asia routes from March 3, 2015.

JAL Sky Wi-Fi logo-1

Under the theme of “Embrace new Challenges,” JAL is striving to introduce more innovative products and services to its customers.

JAL Embrace New Challenges

From March 2015, JAL SKY Wi-Fi, in-flight internet service (paid service) will be expanded on both international and domestic routes. JAL will support onboard passengers to have seamless connectivity in the air just as they can on the ground.

Starting April 2015, JAL will provide customers with the latest Hollywood and Japanese movies and series of TV dramas on international routes. Well-received SKY MANGA will be available on the airline’s Boeing 787s in both Japanese and English in order to introducing the culture of Japanese manga.

On JAL domestic routes, Wi-Fi video service will be increased to 10 programs, and these free programs are available for watching through your own wireless LAN capable devices.

Copyright Photo: Michael B. Ing/AirlinersGallery.com. Boeing 767-346 ER JA608J (msn 33497) approaches the runway at the Tokyo (Narita) hub.

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Florida West to be acquired by Worldwide Air Logistics Group, will become a sister airline of Southern Air

Florida West International Airways (2nd) (Miami) is being acquired by the Worldwide Air Logistics Group and will become a sister airline of Southern Air (2nd) (Cincinnati). Southern Air Holdings issued this statement:

Southern Air Holdings, Inc. has announced that its affiliate, Worldwide Air Logistics Group, Inc., will expand and diversify its ACMI and CMI air cargo service offerings through the acquisition of new fleet platforms, expanded markets and growth of existing operations.

Southern Air Inc., a critical and growing provider of airlift services for DHL Express and other customers, will continue its operations as a subsidiary of Worldwide. Southern Air’s headquarters will remain in Florence, Kentucky.

As part of its efforts to expand service capacity, Worldwide also announced its agreement to acquire Florida West International Airways, Inc., a leading provider of 767-300 ACMI air cargo services. Florida West operates scheduled and charter services, primarily in Latin America, the Caribbean and the U.S. for its primary customer LAN Cargo. Florida West is based in Miami, Florida, where its headquarters will remain. Worldwide’s acquisition of Florida West is subject to regulatory approval.

Southern Air and Florida West will remain separate air carrier operating companies. Each carrier will continue to deliver on a standalone basis the outstanding performance and superior service their customers have grown to expect.

Copyright Photo: Brian McDonough/AirlinersGallery.com. The second Florida West operates Boeing 767-300F freighters. Boeing 767-346F N411LA (msn 35818) departs from Miami International Airport.

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Jay Selman’s An Inside Look: Another End of an Era

Assistant Editor Jay Selman

Assistant Editor Jay Selman

Another End of an Era – Farewell to the Boeing 767

by Assistant Editor Jay Selman

February 12, 2015 marked another end of an era at US Airways, as the company retired its last Boeing 767-200. While the airline was quick to point out that its merger partner, American Airlines, operates nearly 60 of the larger 767-300s, the final flight of the 767-200 represented the end of an era for US Airways. Following the general success of flight US 737, marking the retirement of the company’s last 737 Classic in August 2014, US Airways repeated the act with flight US 767, which operated from Philadelphia to Charlotte, and back to PHL.

The 767 entered the US Airways inventory through the merger with Piedmont Airlines in 1989. Piedmont received its first Boeing 767 on May 21st, 1987, shortly after the merger with USAir was announced. N603P was used to inaugurate the carrier’s first intercontinental service, between Charlotte North Carolina and London’s Gatwick Airport. Piedmont ordered six of the type initially, and after merging with USAir, another six were added to the fleet. Eventually, the 767s were used by US Airways in virtually all of its intercontinental markets. The 767 had the range to fly from Charlotte to Rome, Sao Paulo, and even Honolulu. Its common type rating with the 757 allowed the company to better utilize its pilots.

The Boeing 767 first went into service in 1982. It was the manufacturer’s first wide-body twin engine aircraft and was ground-breaking in several aspects. The 767 was the first Boeing wide-body to be designed with a two-crew digital glass cockpit. Cathode ray tube (CRT) color displays and new electronics replaced the role of the flight engineer by enabling the pilot and co-pilot to monitor aircraft systems directly. (A three-crew cockpit remained as an option and was fitted to the first production models. Ansett Australia ordered 767s with three-crew cockpits due to union demands; it was the only airline to operate 767s so configured.) Development of the 767 occurred in tandem with a narrow-body twinjet, the 757, resulting in shared design features which allow pilots to obtain a common type rating to operate both aircraft.

The 767 was initially flown on domestic and transcontinental routes, during which it demonstrated the reliability of its twinjet design. In 1985, the 767 became the first twin-engine airliner to receive regulatory approval for extended overwater flights. The aircraft was then used to expand non-stop service on medium- to long-haul intercontinental routes. Today, thanks to the concept proven by the ground-breaking 767, over 90% of the intercontinental airline flights are operated by twin engine aircraft flown by a two-pilot crew.

US flight US 767 PHL-CLT with Jay Selman (LRW)

Above Photo: Assistant Editor Jay Selman prepares to depart on flight 767 on February 12 from Philadelphia bound for Charlotte.

US Airways flight 767 PHL departure (JS)(LRW)

Above Photo: Jay Selman. The morning departure of flight 767 from Philadelphia.

There was a low-keyed celebration at the gate in PHL prior to departure of US 767. Breakfast pastries were served and the gate agent boarding the flight made a short announcement explaining the significance of flight 767. We pushed back from gate A18 in PHL at 8:55 am, five minutes early (below).

US Airways 767-200 at gate A18 PHL (JS)(LRW)

US Airways flight US 767 Capt Scott Lesh (JS)(LRW)

 

At the controls were PHL-based Captain Scott Lesh (above) and First Officer John Hyde (below).

US Airways 767-200 flight 767 Capt Scott Lesh and FO John Hyde in cockpit (JS)(LRW)

Above Photo: Jay Selman. Captain Scott Lesh and First Officer John Hyde in the cockpit of N252AU for the final day of revenue flights.

Flying “shotgun” in the flight deck jump seat was First Officer Jim Zazas (below). Jim and I go back a long way, and he is one of those guys we call an “Aviator” with a Capital A. He was in the second 767 class with Piedmont in 1987, and has been on the 757/767 ever since. In his spare time, he flies just about anything with a propeller, especially if it has the classification “Warbird.” From B-17 to P-51, Jim has probably flown it. His latest accomplishment was to get himself checked out in The Tinker Belle, the C-46 based in Monroe, NC. For Jim, this was a farewell to his favorite jet airliner.

US Airways FO Jim Zazas PHL (JS)(LRW)

Above Photo: Jay Selman. US Airways First Officer Jim Zazas.

I found it interesting that the flight was basically an extra section, added to the flight schedule approximately one month earlier, yet we departed PHL with every single seat filled. There were a significant number of aviation enthusiasts on board, but for the majority of the passengers, this was merely one more flight from Point A to Point B.

The flight was operated by N252AU, a 767-2B7 ER, msn 24765. 252 was originally delivered to USAir as N652US on May 25, 1990. It was the 308th production 767. From November 1993 until April of 1996, this aircraft was used on a wet lease program on behalf of British Airways, and flew in the British carrier’s colors during that time. Following the merger between US Airways and America West Airlines, the aircraft received its current registration.

<p><a href=”https://vimeo.com/119629568″>US Airways Boeing 767-200 N252AU departure from PHL on the last day</a> from <a href=”https://vimeo.com/user19954503″>Bruce Drum</a> on <a href=”https://vimeo.com”>Vimeo</a&gt;.</p>

Video: Jay Selman. The departure of N252AU from Philadelphia on the last day.

US Airways 767-200 N252AU arrival at CLT last day (JS)(LRW)

Our flight to Charlotte was uneventful, and following a well-deserved water cannon salute (above), we arrived at Gate D2 a little past 10:44 am. There, the company presented two cakes, decorated in blue and white, commemorating the retirement of the 767-200 (below).

US Airways 767-200 last flight cake (JS)(LRW)

 

US Airways 767-200 last flight US 767 CLT crew (best)(JS)(LRW)

Above Photo: Jay Selman. The crew of flight 767 poses with the two special cakes at the Charlotte turnaround.

During the nearly two-hour turnaround, I had a chance to chat with the lead Flight Attendant, Ellie Zalesky. Ellie told me that she began her career with Mohawk. “I’ve worked every airplane from the FH-227 to the A330, and the 767 was my favorite, hands down. I’m really going to miss her.” We had a chance to snap some souvenir photos prior to the final scheduled flight, and then it was time to head back to PHL.

US Airways 767-200 N252AU and crew on ramp CLT (best)(JS)(LRW)

Above Photo: The crew of flight US 767 poses with Boeing 767-2B7 ER N252AU on the ramp at Charlotte during the turnaround.

The return flight of US 767 pushed away from the gate in Charlotte at 12:27. It was markedly different from the first leg. The plane was less than 1/3 full, and this time, the majority of the passengers were hard-core enthusiasts and airline employees, much to the curiosity of the few “regular passengers” on board. There was a party atmosphere in flight, as we took time to enjoy the final flight of the 767-200. The flight attendants were surprised by the “enthusiast culture”, but quickly warmed to the occasion. Captain Lesh made a long announcement regarding the last flight of the 767-200, and its significance to US Airways, and commercial aviation.

US Airways 767-200 N262AU cabin (JS)(LRW)

Above Photo: Jay Selman. The cabin of N252AU.

I also had a chance to talk to another old friend, Bruce Clarke, who retired as a Captain on the 757/767. Of the 767, Bruce waxed poetic, “I don’t think that Boeing has ever built a sweeter airliner. She never put me into a situation that I could not easily get out of. With a service ceiling of 41,000 ft, we could get above a lot of weather…and other traffic.” (Shortly before he mentioned that, I looked out the window and noticed a CRJ900 cruising a few thousand feet below us). Clarke continues, “The CF6 engines put out plenty of power so even at max takeoff weight of 395,000 lbs, the 767-200 ER climbs effortlessly. The 767 has inboard and outboard ailerons, which gives her incredible agility. She is a very stable platform and cuts through turbulence like a knife through soft butter. I’ve flown the 707, 727. 737, 757, and 767, and the 767 was by far my favorite.” Clearly, everyone I spoke with who had flown or worked the 767 loves her.

US Airways welcome to Philadelphia (JS)(LRW)

Above Photo: Jay Selman. Back at PHL once again.

We arrived back at the gate in PHL at 13:46, about 20 minutes early. Most of us were in no rush to deplane. Instead, we lingered for just another few minutes, savoring what will probably, for most of us, be our last moments on a 767-200. After all, as US Airways removes its last 767 from the fleet, its merger partner, American Airlines, prepares to introduce the 787 into service.

The crew patiently stayed onboard to pose for final photos, answer final questions, and perhaps absorb those last few moments on the aircraft they love.

When Captain Lesh shut down the CF6s, N252AU had logged 100,813.48 hours, and amassed 18663 cycles, relatively few for today’s jet airliners. The airframe has plenty of life left in her, and, while nothing has been officially announced, there is an excellent chance that the 767 will be “re-purposed” in the near future.

As a postscript, a Boeing 757 scheduled to operate a round trip from Philadelphia to Charlotte later in the day developed a mechanical issue, and 252’s retirement was postponed for another few hours. The final round trip, however, was done with none of the hoopla reserved for flight US 767. As far as we were concerned, we were on THE retirement flight.

Piedmont (2nd) logo

 

As one more side note, when sister ships 249 and 250 were officially retired from the US Airways fleet, they represented the last airplanes that flew for Piedmont Airlines. As an original “Piedmonter”, this fact was as significant to me as the retirement of the 767-200.

Jay Selman with 252 (nose)(JS)(LRW)

Above Photo: What will be the fate of ship “252”?

US Airways aircraft slide show: AG Airline Slide Show

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US Airways operates its last Boeing 767 revenue flight

US Airways (Phoenix) as planned, operated its last Boeing 767-200 revenue flight and retired the type yesterday joining partner American Airlines (Dallas/Fort Worth) in retiring the aging type.

American previously retired their 767-200s on May 7, 2014 between Los Angeles and New York (JFK). American’s Boeing 767-223 ER N319AA (msn 22320) operated flight AA 30 from Los Angeles to New York (JFK) departing LAX on the evening of May 7 and arriving at JFK during the early morning of May 8. American introduced the 767-200 in November 1982.

US Airways yesterday (February 12) operated its last passenger flight for the Boeing 767.

Assistant Editor Jay Selman was on the historic flight and has published his special report on the last trip.

Read the full report: CLICK HERE

Piedmont Airlines (1st) took delivery of the first 767-200 ER, specifically 767-201 ER N603P (msn 23897), named “The Pride of Piedmont”, on May 21, 1987. The type entered service on June 15, 1987 on the Charlotte – London (Gatwick) route. The type migrated to USAir (later US Airways) with the merger.

Copyright Photo: Bruce Drum/AirlinersGallery.com. Boeing 767-2B7 ER N252AU (msn 24765) is pictured at Charlotte Douglas International Airport (CLT) and operated the last revenue flights.

US Airways aircraft slide show: AG Airline Slide Show

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SkyGreece Airlines to connect Toronto and Zagreb this summer

SkyGreece 767-300 (Nose)(SkyGreece)(LR)

SkyGreece Airlines (Athens) has announced it will start weekly seasonal operations between Toronto (Pearson) and Zagreb, Croatia on June 22, 2015 with its 274-seat Boeing 767-300 ERs. The flights will operate until October 15.

Images: SkyGreece Airlines.

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Video: Inside the cockpit of the last QANTAS Airways Boeing 767 flight

Video: QANTAS Airways. On December 27, QANTAS Airways said goodbye to the final Boeing 767 in the QANTAS fleet. The 767 has been in the QF fleet since July 1985 and has carried nearly 168 million passengers on over 927,000 flights. The video includes two QF 767 First Officers for filming of the final flight.

QANTAS Airways aircraft slide show:

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American Airlines’ pilots approve the new five-year contract

American Airlines (Dallas/Fort Worth) has announced its 15,000 pilots have ratified the new contract. The company issued this statement:

The Allied Pilots Association (APA), representing 15,000 pilots at American Airlines, announced its members have approved a new five-year contract which provides immediate pay raises of 23 percent and subsequent annual raises of three percent for the next five years.

American Airlines President Scott Kirby said, “Today’s results provide immediate and significant pay increases to our pilots, and represent another step forward in our integration. We are especially pleased that American is in a position to support pay increases that recognize the contributions of our pilots this early in our integration. We also acknowledge and applaud the hard work and leadership of APA President Capt. Keith Wilson, the APA national officers, the negotiating teams from the APA and the company, as well as members of the APA Board.”

Copyright Photo: Brian McDonough/AirlinersGallery.com. Boeing 767-323 ER N383AN (msn 26995) arrives in Miami.

American Airlines aircraft slide show (current livery):

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