Tag Archives: Boeing 787-8

JAL is coming back to Dallas/Fort Worth

JAL-Japan Airlines (Tokyo) will restore the Tokyo (Narita) – Dallas/Fort Worth route on November 30. The restored route will be operated with Boeing 787-8 Dreamliners four days a week.

JAL-Japan Airlines logo-1

American Airlines issued this statement welcoming back JAL to DFW:

American Airlines 2013 logo

American Airlines is pleased to welcome fellow oneworld alliance member and Pacific Joint Business partner Japan Airlines (JAL) to Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (DFW) with its return to service between Tokyo Narita (NRT) and DFW starting November 30, 2015. American will add its code to the route.

American currently operates twice-daily service from DFW to NRT with Boeing 777-200 aircraft. JAL will offer customers service four days per week with Boeing 787-8 aircraft fitted with the airline’s latest cabin interiors and seats in a three-class configuration and is considering scheduling daily service for spring 2016.

“On behalf of American’s 100,000 employees, we welcome our joint business partner, Japan Airlines, to our great hub in Dallas/Fort Worth,” said Andrew Nocella, American’s chief marketing officer. “American is making great strides to expand our presence in Asia, and this partnership represents a key component of that effort. This new service complements American’s existing service and brings more choice for our customers traveling between Asia and the U.S., providing more opportunities to connect Asia to South America. Japan Airlines is an honorable partner and a great friend to American.”

“We are pleased to announce the return of Dallas/Fort Worth to our international network, which becomes our eighth gateway in North America and our fourth U.S. service launch in just over three years,” said Yoshiharu Ueki, President of Japan Airlines. “By making full use of the efficiencies of the Dreamliner as well as capitalizing on our even stronger relationship with American Airlines, we are confident this resumed service will provide even more valuable links for commercial and cultural exchanges for our customers in both regions and beyond.”

“We are honored to welcome back Japan Airlines to Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport and are excited about the outstanding connectivity and customer service they will provide to passengers flying to Japan and throughout Asia,” said Sean Donohue, chief executive officer of DFW Airport. “With the addition of this new flight to Tokyo, coupled with partner American Airlines’ two daily flights, DFW Airport will further support our mission to connect the world to Dallas Fort Worth.”

 

American and JAL commenced their Pacific Joint Business partnership in April 2011, and have since greatly expanded customer benefits including better flight schedules, expanded codesharing, more coordinated services and greater access to a wider variety of fares.

JAL will offer a special bonus mile campaign for JAL Mileage Bank loyalty program members. For details, refer to the JAL website.

Copyright Photo: Fred Freketic/AirlinersGallery.com. Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner JA839J (msn 34853) taxies at New York’s JFK International Airport (JFK).

JAL aircraft slide show: AG Airline Slide Show

Facebook More Airline News (600)

Air Canada reports a record second quarter net profit

Air Canada (Montreal) reported record second quarter adjusted net income of $250 million (1) (all amounts are reported in Canadian dollars) or $0.85 per diluted share compared to adjusted net income of $139 million or $0.47 per diluted share in the second quarter of 2014, an improvement of $111 million or approximately 80 percent. EBITDAR(1) (earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, amortization and aircraft rent) amounted to $591 million compared to EBITDAR of $456 million in the same quarter in 2014, an increase of $135 million or approximately 30 per cent year-over-year. The airline recorded an EBITDAR margin of 17.3 per cent compared to an EBITDAR margin of 13.8 per cent in the second quarter of 2014, an improvement of 3.5 percentage points. On a GAAP basis, Air Canada reported record second quarter operating income of $323 million compared to operating income of $245 million, an improvement of $78 million or approximately 32 per cent from the second quarter of 2014. An operating margin of 9.5 per cent in the second quarter of 2015 reflected an improvement of 2.1 percentage points from the same quarter in 2014.

Air Canada logo-1

“We again expect to deliver record results in the third quarter, with EBITDAR margin expansion versus prior year higher than the 350 basis point expansion recorded in the second quarter. Demand continues to be robust moving into, historically, our most important quarter given the travel demands and patterns of our North American customers. Our capacity additions for the year, which are largely in our international markets, are important contributors to our increased profits and remain consistent with our plan established in a higher fuel price environment. Our plan is not dependant or conditional on fuel prices staying at the current levels; and the transformative changes we have made over the last several years provide us with the cost structure, fleet and flexibility to respond not only to increased competition in any of our key markets, but also to weaknesses in the Canadian dollar or a downturn in the economy. If we see demand weakening, we can adjust quickly. We are building a resilient airline for the long-term, a sustainably profitable company and global industry leader,” said Mr. Rovinescu.

Second Quarter Income Statement Highlights

In the second quarter of 2015, on capacity growth of 9.3 per cent, system passenger revenues of $3.082 billion increased $117 million or 3.9 per cent from the second quarter of 2014. Traffic growth of 8.7 per cent reflected traffic increases in all of Air Canada’s five geographic markets. A yield decline of 5.0 per cent, consistent with the anticipated yield impact stemming from the implementation of the airline’s strategic plan, reflected an increase in average stage length of 3.4 per cent, which had the effect of reducing system yield by 1.9 percentage points, a higher proportional growth of lower-yielding international-to-international passenger flows in support of the airline’s international expansion strategy, a higher proportion of seats into long-haul leisure markets, and a reduction in carrier surcharges relating to lower fuel prices, particularly where carrier surcharges are regulated. The favourable impact of a weaker Canadian dollar on foreign currency denominated passenger revenues increased passenger revenues by approximately $61 million in the second quarter of 2015. Passenger revenue per available seat mile (PRASM) decreased 5.5 per cent from the second quarter of 2014 on the lower yield and, to a much lesser extent, a passenger load factor decline of 0.5 percentage points.

In the second quarter of 2015, operating expenses of $3.091 billion increased $31 million or 1.0 per cent from the second quarter of 2014 on the capacity growth of 9.3 per cent. The increase in operating expenses reflected the impact of the weaker Canadian dollar and capacity-related cost increases largely offset by the impact of lower jet fuel prices. The second quarter of 2015 included impairment charges of $14 million and favourable tax-related provision adjustments of $23 million while the second quarter of 2014 included favourable tax-related provision adjustments of $41 million (the impairment charges and tax-related provision adjustments are excluded from adjusted net income and adjusted CASM results). The unfavourable impact of a weaker Canadian dollar on foreign currency denominated operating expenses (mainly U.S. dollars) in the second quarter of 2015, when compared to the second quarter of 2014, increased operating expenses by approximately $134 million (comprised of $73 million in aircraft fuel expense and an aggregate of $61 million in non-fuel operating expenses).

Air Canada’s cost per available seat mile (CASM) decreased 7.6 per cent from the second quarter of 2014. The airline’s adjusted CASM(1), which excludes fuel expense, the cost of ground packages at Air Canada Vacations® and unusual items (such as the impairment charges and the tax-related provision adjustments discussed above) increased 0.7 per cent from the second quarter of 2014, in line with the 0.25 to 1.25 per cent increase projected in Air Canada’s news release dated May 12, 2015. Had the Canadian-U.S. dollar exchange rate remained at 2014 levels, adjusted CASM would have decreased 1.8 per cent when compared to the second quarter of 2014.

Financial and Capital Management Highlights

At June 30, 2015, unrestricted liquidity (cash, short-term investments and undrawn lines of credit) amounted to $3.283 billion (June 30, 2014 – $2.954 billion).

Adjusted net debt amounted to $4.896 billion at June 30, 2015, a decrease of $236 million from December 31, 2014 as higher cash and short-term investments balances more than offset the increase in long-term debt and finance lease balances (including current portion). The airline’s adjusted net debt to EBITDAR ratio was 2.3 at June 30, 2015 versus a ratio of 3.1 at December 31, 2014.

In the second quarter of 2015, net cash flows from operating activities totaled $509 million, an improvement of $123 million from the second quarter of 2014. Free cash flow(1) amounted to $299 million, $335 million higher than the second quarter of 2014. This increase reflected a decrease in capital expenditures of $212 million and the higher cash flows from operating activities.

For the 12 months ended June 30, 2015, return on invested capital (ROIC(1)) was 16.2 per cent versus 11.0 per cent for the 12 months ended June 30, 2014.

Current Outlook

EBITDAR Margin

For the third quarter of 2015, Air Canada expects to deliver record results, with EBITDAR margin expansion versus prior year higher than the 350 basis point expansion recorded in the second quarter of 2015.

Capacity

Air Canada expects third quarter 2015 system ASM capacity, as measured by available seat miles (ASMs), to increase 9.5 to 10.5 per cent when compared to the third quarter of 2014, and to be comprised of an increase in the total number of seats dispatched (system) of 6.5 to 7.5 per cent and an increase in system average stage length (measured by ASMs divided by seats dispatched) of approximately 3.0 per cent when compared to the same quarter in 2014.

Air Canada continues to expect its full year 2015 system ASM capacity to increase by 9.0 to 10.0 per cent. For the full year 2015, Air Canada continues to expect an increase in the total number of seats dispatched (system) of 6.0 to 7.0 per cent and an increase in average stage length (system) of approximately 3.0 per cent when compared to the full year 2014. Approximately 55 per cent of the 2015 forecasted capacity increase will be through the continued lower-cost growth of Air Canada rouge® while approximately 38 per cent of the capacity growth will be targeted to international markets operated by the mainline carrier.

Air Canada now expects its full year 2015 domestic ASM capacity to increase by 3.0 to 4.0 per cent when compared to 2014 as opposed to the 3.5 to 4.5 per cent increase projected in Air Canada’s May 12, 2015 news release, primarily the result of minor schedule changes. The year-over-year growth in full year 2015 domestic ASM capacity is largely focused on the airline’s transcontinental services, reflecting, in large part, the positioning of certain Boeing 777 and 787 aircraft at Air Canada’s major hubs in Toronto and Vancouver. Furthermore, in 2015, an overlap of the aircraft brought into the fleet to replace the exiting Embraer 190 aircraft is expected to account for approximately 30 per cent of the projected domestic capacity growth in 2015. This overlap is designed to better match capacity with expected 2015 summer season demand. For the full year 2015, Air Canada now expects an increase in the total number of seats dispatched (domestic) of 2.0 to 3.0 per cent and an increase in average stage length (domestic) of approximately 1.0 per cent when compared to the full year 2014.

Adjusted CASM

For the third quarter of 2015, Air Canada expects adjusted CASM (which excludes fuel expense, the cost of ground packages at Air Canada Vacations and unusual items) to decrease by 0.5 to 1.5 per cent when compared to the third quarter of 2014.

For the full year 2015, Air Canada now expects adjusted CASM to decrease 1.0 to 2.0 per cent from the full year 2014 as opposed to the decrease of 1.5 to 2.5 per cent projected in Air Canada’s May 12, 2015 news release, reflecting, in large part, the impact of a weaker Canadian dollar on U.S. denominated operating expenses.

Major Assumptions

Air Canada’s outlook assumes relatively low Canadian GDP growth for 2015. Air Canada also expects that the Canadian dollar will trade, on average, at C$1.30 per U.S. dollar in the third quarter of 2015 and C$1.27 for the full year 2015 and that the price of jet fuel will average 62 cents per litre for the third quarter of 2015 and 64 cents per litre for the full year 2015.

For the full year 2015, Air Canada also expects:

  • Depreciation, amortization and impairment expense to increase by $125 million from the full year 2014 as opposed to the increase of $100 million projected in Air Canada’s May 12, 2015 news release. The increase in projected depreciation, amortization and impairment expense is largely driven by the impairment charges recorded in the second quarter of 2015.
  • Employee benefits expense to increase $30 million from the full year 2014 (as opposed to the increase of $50 million projected in Air Canada’s May 12, 2015 news release). The lower expected increase in employee benefits expense is primarily driven by benefit plan amendments relating to U.S. post-retirement health plans which reduced employee benefits expense by $19 million in the second quarter of 2015.
  • Aircraft maintenance expense to increase $90 million as opposed to the $120 million increase projected in Air Canada’s May 12, 2015 news release. The lower expected increase in aircraft maintenance expense is mainly driven by the timing of engine maintenance events when compared to 2014 and certain contract amendments.

(1) Non-GAAP Measures

Below is a description of certain non-GAAP measures used by Air Canada in order to provide readers with additional information on its financial and operating performance. Such measures are not recognized measures for financial statement presentation under Canadian GAAP and do not have standardized meanings and may not be comparable to similar measures presented by other public companies. Refer to Air Canada’s Second Quarter 2015 MD&A for reconciliation of non-GAAP financial measures.

Adjusted net income (loss) and adjusted net income (loss) per diluted share are used by Air Canada to assess the overall financial performance of its business without the effects of foreign exchange, net financing income (expense) relating to employee benefits, mark-to-market adjustments on fuel and other derivatives and unusual items as these items may distort the analysis of certain business trends and render comparative analysis to other airlines less meaningful. Air Canada also uses adjusted net income as a measure to determine return on invested capital.

EBITDAR is commonly used in the airline industry and is used by Air Canada to assess earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, amortization, impairment and aircraft rent as these costs can vary significantly among airlines due to differences in the way airlines finance their aircraft and other assets.

Adjusted CASM is used by Air Canada to assess the operating and cost performance of its ongoing airline business without the effects of fuel expense, the cost of ground packages at Air Canada Vacations and unusual items, as such expenses may distort the analysis of certain business trends and render comparative analysis to other airlines less meaningful.

Free cash flow is used by Air Canada as an indicator of the financial strength and performance of its business because it shows how much cash is available for such purposes as repaying debt, meeting ongoing financial obligations and reinvesting in Air Canada.

Return on invested capital (ROIC) is used by Air Canada to assess the efficiency with which it allocates its capital to generate returns. Return is based on adjusted net income (loss) (as referred to in the paragraph above), excluding interest expense and implicit interest on operating leases. Invested capital includes average year-over-year total assets, net of average year-over-year non-interest-bearing operating liabilities, and the value of capitalized operating leases (calculated by multiplying annualized aircraft rent by 7).

Notes:

(1)
Adjusted net income (loss) and adjusted net income (loss) per share – diluted are non-GAAP financial measures. Refer to section 16 “Non-GAAP Financial Measures” of Air Canada’s Second Quarter 2015 MD&A for additional information.
(2)
EBITDAR (earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, amortization, impairment and aircraft rent) is a non-GAAP financial measure. Refer to section 16 “Non-GAAP Financial Measures” of Air Canada’s Second Quarter 2015 MD&A for additional information.
(3)
Unrestricted liquidity refers to the sum of cash, cash equivalents, short-term investments and the amount of available credit under Air Canada’s revolving credit facilities. At June 30, 2015, unrestricted liquidity was comprised of cash and short-term investments of $3,021 million and undrawn lines of credit of $262 million. At June 30, 2014, unrestricted liquidity was comprised of cash and short-term investments of $2,615 million and undrawn lines of credit of $339 million.
(4)
Free cash flow (cash flows from operating activities less additions to property, equipment and intangible assets) is a non-GAAP financial measure. Refer to section 7.5 “Consolidated Cash Flow Movements” of Air Canada’s Second Quarter 2015 MD&A for additional information.
(5)
Adjusted net debt (total debt less cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments plus capitalized operating leases) is an additional GAAP financial measure. Refer to section 7.3 “Adjusted Net Debt” of Air Canada’s Second Quarter 2015 MD&A for additional information.
(6)
Return on invested capital (“ROIC”) is a non-GAAP financial measure. Refer to section 16 “Non-GAAP Financial Measures” of Air Canada’s Second Quarter 2015 MD&A for additional information.
(7)
Except for the reference to average number of FTE employees, operating statistics in this table include third party carriers (such as Jazz Aviation LP (“Jazz”) and Sky Regional Airlines Inc. (“Sky Regional”)) operating under capacity purchase agreements with Air Canada.
(8)
Adjusted CASM is a non-GAAP financial measure. Refer to section 16 “Non-GAAP Financial Measures” of Air Canada’s Second Quarter 2015 MD&A for additional information.
(9)
Reflects FTE employees at Air Canada. Excludes FTE employees at third party carriers (such as Jazz and Sky Regional) operating under capacity purchase agreements with Air Canada.
(10)
Average stage length is calculated by dividing the total number of available seat miles by the total number of seats dispatched.
(11)
Revenue passengers are counted on a flight number basis which is consistent with the IATA definition of revenue passengers carried.

Copyright Photo: Rob Rindt/AirlinersGallery.com. A beautiful portait of Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner C-GHPU (msn 35259) departing from Vancouver International Airport (YVR).

Air Canada aircraft slide show: AG Airline Slide Show

Facebook More Airline News (600)

LAN Airlines to introduce the Boeing 787 to Milan

LAN Airlines (Chile) (Santiago) will introduce the Boeing 787 Dreamliner on the Santiago – Sao Paulo (Guarulhos) – Milan (Malpensa) route on March 2, 2016 per Airline Route.

Copyright Photo: Michael B. Ing/AirlinersGallery.com. Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner CC-BBI (msn 38480) departs from Los Angeles International Airport.

LAN Airlines (Chile) aircraft slide show: AG Airline Slide Show

AG Visit our new look

Qatar Airways submits a “white paper” to the U.S. Government in support of “Open Skies”

Qatar Airways (Doha) today issued this statement concerning its on-going battle with the U.S. “Big Three” concerning alleged government subsidies and Open Skies:

Qatar Airways logo

Qatar Airways has yesterday submitted a ‘White Paper’ to the United States Government which fully refutes the subsidy allegations levelled against it by the Big 3 US carriers.

The detailed submission comprehensively addresses and answers all issues raised in the ‘Open Skies’ debate, which has put into question the longstanding US policy of allowing carriers to fly to and from the United States with minimal government interference.

The Big 3 – American Airlines, Delta Air Lines and United Airlines (and their unions) have been pressing the US Government to depart from its pro-Open Skies stance and impose unilateral limits on the services operated by Gulf airlines, even though the U.S. Open Skies policy was specifically designed by the US Government to ensure that US carriers were free to operate their extensive networks without foreign government restrictions on the level and routings of the services they offer.

The biggest US carriers have made ample use of their behind-country (Sixth Freedom) traffic rights, and have fought hard to preserve their own access to those rights, and to carry Fifth Freedom (third country) traffic as well. Given that these policies were created by and for US carriers, it is ironic that they are now describing the use of these traffic rights to be “unfair” when exercised by Gulf carriers.

In its report, Qatar Airways demonstrates that the many of the market changes complained of by the Big 3 are not the product of “unfair competition” (or anything remotely related to subsidy), but are instead the byproduct of important advances in aircraft technology and significant demographic changes. With ultra-long range Boeing 777 and Boeing 787 aircraft, passengers bound for the Middle East and India can now over-fly congested European hubs, and enjoy convenient one-stop services to their destinations, instead of making longer two-and three stop journeys. These technological changes have shortened travel times, and have brought families and businesses closer together.

Qatar Airways also demonstrated that although US carrier market share to the Indian subcontinent may have shifted over time, the market as a whole has grown, and US carriers are carrying more traffic in absolute terms.

Qatar Airways also disproved the claim that its services harm any US carrier, noting that it does not compete against any US carrier on any nonstop route, and serves cities that have never been served by US carriers, such as Cochin, Karachi and Amritsar. In fact, the services operated by Qatar Airways benefit US carriers. Qatar Airways works cooperatively with and feeds traffic to US carriers, including American Airlines (its code-sharing and oneworld alliance partner) and JetBlue Airways. The report also proves that the airline’s operations to the US market have significantly contributed to the economy in terms of jobs, cargo and overall passenger traffic (tourism and business travel growth), as well as providing benefits for non-aligned US passenger carriers, cargo carriers and airports.

In addition to benefiting American travellers, Qatar Airways has strongly supported the US aerospace industry. As of today, the airline has 162 aircraft flying to 150 destinations, of which over 40 per cent are Boeing jets worth over $19 billion USD.
Qatar Airways Group Chief Executive, Mr. Akbar Al Baker, commented: “Qatar Airways was a relatively unknown airline when it first launched a service to the United States in 2007.

“Since then, we have built up a significant brand presence on the routes that we operate to the United States. Our passengers have come to know us, not through size alone, but by the signature service and quality of the product on board – and also the breadth of our network.

“There has been significant demand for our services from the U.S. not just to the Middle East – but beyond – where no other carriers fly. This makes us a natural choice for consumers, and is a reflection of how globalised our world has become. People are travelling further than ever before and it is important that in an economy focused on open market principles, our wings remain open for business, rather than closed.”
Qatar Airways also demonstrated that its services are lawful and consistent with the US-Qatar Agreement, which in Article 11.2 says that “neither Party shall unilaterally limit the volume of traffic, frequency or regularity of service, or the aircraft type or types operated by the designated airlines of the other Party.” Despite this clear language, the Big 3 are urging the US Government to ignore its obligations by imposing a unilateral limit on Qatar Airways’ capacity.

Other US airlines have noted that foreign governments often try to block competition from strong US airlines by challenging “excess” capacity offered by US carriers, and cautioned the US Government against deviating from a free trade policy that has worked to the overwhelming benefit of US airlines.

As Qatar Airways GCEO Mr. Akbar Al Baker observed: “The US Government should reject calls to “freeze” the US-Qatar Open Skies Agreement, and recognize these allegations for what they are – a transparent attempt by the Big 3 to block air services that compete with their own.”

Qatar Airways also examined and rebutted each of the subsidy allegations made, noting that US carriers benefit from many of the same policies they have attacked. Indeed, the claims of subsidy advanced by the Big 3 include items of support that US carriers have themselves received for decades, and items that have never been viewed as a form of subsidy. In fact, many other airlines (including US airlines) have acknowledged publicly that they and the Big 3 have themselves been long-time beneficiaries of subsidies and favorable US policies and support.

While Qatar Airways is used to strong competition, it expressed concern about the efforts of the Big 3 to persuade the US Government to refer to rules that do not apply to aviation to resolve their complaints. The application of WTO trade principles, and US domestic trade laws to these complaints – rules that apply solely to trade in goods – would be completely unlawful.

Qatar Airways GCEO Mr. Akbar Al Baker added:

“It is puzzling to see the biggest US carriers describe Qatar Airways as a “threat,” given our small size and lack of direct competition with them. Their long-standing focus on other markets, and large (and growing) profits completely undercut this claim. The Open Skies model was developed by the American carriers and has demonstrated how an Open Skies paves the way for an open economy. We are concerned to see the Big 3 seek to change the rules of the game as soon as they see US consumers respond well to the services offered by a competitor. Qatar Airways is proud of its signature five-star service, brand identity, and the high standards we deliver to our passengers onboard.”

Photo: Qatar Airways.

Qatar Airways aircraft slide show: AG Airline Slide Show

AG Visit the new-look AG

 

 

Xiamen Air launches the Xiamen – Amsterdam route

Xiamen Airlines (Xiamen Air) (Xiamen) has launched its first route to Europe. The Chinese airline issued this statement:

Xiamen Air logo

On July 26, Xiamen Airlines officially launched the carrier’s very first intercontinental route, the Xiamen-Amsterdam route. The new route marks a key milestone in the airline’s implementation of its globalization strategy.

Xiamen Airlines will operate the new route, flight numbers MF811 and MF812, with a Boeing 787 Dreamliner featuring 4 seats in first class, 18 in business and 214 in economy. The flight departs Xiamen at 11:50 p.m. every Tuesday, Thursday and Sunday, and arrives at Amsterdam’s Schiphol at 5:45 a.m. the next day. The flight duration is 11 hours and 55 minutes. The return journey departs Amsterdam at 12:35 p.m. every Monday, Wednesday and Friday, and arrives in Xiamen at 5:30 a.m. the next day, with a flight duration of 10 hours and 55 minutes. The above are all local times, and were arranged to facilitate connections to other flights after passengers reach their destinations.

The new route complements KLM Royal Dutch Airlines’ existing Xiamen-Amsterdam route — also on a three-times-a-week schedule, signifying that, starting from July 26, there will be six direct flights between Xiamen and Amsterdam weekly.

Xiamen Airlines has upgraded both the air and ground services for the new intercontinental route, with a concerted effort on integrating Chinese cultural elements into its services. As an example, the new tableware for the first class and business class cabins are made of blanc de chine, and authentic highly-reputed lapsang souchong tea will be on offer in the two cabins.

Xiamen Airlines operates a fleet of 119 Boeing jets, which is the biggest all-Boeing fleet in China. The fleet now has 5 Boeing 787-8 Dreamliners, with the sixth to be delivered soon. As part of the expansion plans for further intercontinental routes originating from Fujian province, the airline has ordered 4 more advanced Boeing 787-9aircraft, forming a fleet of 10 Boeing 787s.

Chairman and general manager Che Shanglun explained that Xiamen Airlines will launch a direct Xiamen-Sydney route at the end of this year. Next year, the carrier plans to launch routes to North America, completing a route network covering Europe, America and Australia, and supporting China’s “One Belt, One Road” strategy by creating a “Silk Road in the Sky.”

Copyright Photo: Ton Jochems/AirlinersGallery.com. Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner B-2762 (msn 41542) taxies at Amsterdam.

Xiamen Air aircraft slide show: AG Airline Slide Show

AG You do not have to pay

 

LOT announces increased frequencies to North America and new destinations

LOT Polish Airlines (Warsaw) in the winter season of 2016/2017 will enhance its presence in the US by increasing frequencies from New York (JFK) and Chicago (O’Hare) to Warsaw. The Polish carrier has also announced several new long-haul destinations from its Warsaw hub to Bangkok, Seoul and Tokyo (Narita). LOT will also launch more than a dozen new European connections, thus expanding its hub and providing convenient connecting flights to passengers flying to such cities as Ljubljana, Zurich, Cluj-Napoca and Nice.

The airline continued:

Long-haul flights are the most important part of LOT’s strategy. The first new long-haul flight is scheduled for January 13, 2016 and will be to Tokyo–the first direct connection from Poland and New Europe (Central and Eastern Europe) to Japan. Bangkok and Seoul will start in autumn 2016. The Polish carrier will also enhance its presence in New York and Chicago by adding two additional frequencies to its winter schedule from each city.

“Opening new long-haul destinations is essential for our development, which is why we will launch them as quickly as possible,” said Sebastian Mikosz, CEO of LOT Polish Airlines.

“Even now, connections operated by the Dreamliner (above) are the most profitable part of our business.

LOT is the only airline that offers on a larger scale, convenient, regular flights from Poland and New Europe to New York, Chicago, Toronto and Beijing. Four current connections will be supplemented with three more, and later this year, LOT will announce two new long-haul destinations to operate in 2016. After opening these five new destinations next year, LOT will more than double its network of long-haul connections compared to today. We want our hub to develop along with us. Opening more than a dozen European connections guarantees even more convenient transfers for new passengers from Poland and the entire region. But the new connections are just the start. Next year we plan to enhance our presence in those destinations where we already operate. This means, for example, an increased frequency of flights from Chicago and New York in the winter season.”

In addition to the new long-haul flights, LOT will begin to fly to three new destinations in Europe in 2016: from Warsaw to Venice and Cluj-Napoca (January) and to Ljubljana (March). LOT will also return to routes that were suspended due to the Restructuring Plan. Thus LOT’s passengers will be able to fly directly from Warsaw to Barcelona (January) and to Athens, Nice, Zurich and Beirut (March). From January 2016, flights between Warsaw and Belgrade, Dusseldorf, Yerevan, Chisinau, Zagreb and between Gdansk and Krakow will be restored, many of which are the connections suspended since July this year, as part of the final pool of compensatory measures required by the European Commission.

LOT is able to operate the entire first phase of its network development using only existing aircraft.

Copyright Photo: Chris Sands/AirlinersGallery.com. Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner SP-LRC (msn 35940) departs from Calgary.

LOT Polish aircraft slide show: AG Airline Slide Show

AG Bottom Ad Bar

British Airways to resume Boeing 787-8 service on the London Heathrow – Calgary route, announces more 787-9 routes

British Airways (London) will resume daily Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner service on the London (Heathrow) – Calgary route now on December 5, 2015 per Airline Route. The Boeing 767-300 will be assigned to the route from October 25 until December 4.

In other news, BA has announced the new Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner will be assigned to the London (Heathrow) – Delhi route from October 25 according to Airline Route.

Additionally the new type will be assigned to the London (Heathrow) – Abu Dhabi – Muscat route starting on November 17.

The 787-9 will also now operate on the London (Heathrow) – Kuala Lumpur route starting December 21 and the new London (Heathrow) – Austin route starting February 22, 2016.

British Airways logo

Copyright Photo: SPA/AirlinersGallery.com. British Airways currently operates eight Boeing 787-8 Dreamliners. The first 787-9 Dreamliner will be registered as G-ZBKA (msn 38616). BA has 16 on order. Boeing 787-8 G-ZBJC (msn 38611) departs from London (Heathrow).

British Airways aircraft slide show: AG Airline Slide Show

AG No Registering