Tag Archives: Boeing 787

JAL is coming back to Dallas/Fort Worth

JAL-Japan Airlines (Tokyo) will restore the Tokyo (Narita) – Dallas/Fort Worth route on November 30. The restored route will be operated with Boeing 787-8 Dreamliners four days a week.

JAL-Japan Airlines logo-1

American Airlines issued this statement welcoming back JAL to DFW:

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American Airlines is pleased to welcome fellow oneworld alliance member and Pacific Joint Business partner Japan Airlines (JAL) to Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (DFW) with its return to service between Tokyo Narita (NRT) and DFW starting November 30, 2015. American will add its code to the route.

American currently operates twice-daily service from DFW to NRT with Boeing 777-200 aircraft. JAL will offer customers service four days per week with Boeing 787-8 aircraft fitted with the airline’s latest cabin interiors and seats in a three-class configuration and is considering scheduling daily service for spring 2016.

“On behalf of American’s 100,000 employees, we welcome our joint business partner, Japan Airlines, to our great hub in Dallas/Fort Worth,” said Andrew Nocella, American’s chief marketing officer. “American is making great strides to expand our presence in Asia, and this partnership represents a key component of that effort. This new service complements American’s existing service and brings more choice for our customers traveling between Asia and the U.S., providing more opportunities to connect Asia to South America. Japan Airlines is an honorable partner and a great friend to American.”

“We are pleased to announce the return of Dallas/Fort Worth to our international network, which becomes our eighth gateway in North America and our fourth U.S. service launch in just over three years,” said Yoshiharu Ueki, President of Japan Airlines. “By making full use of the efficiencies of the Dreamliner as well as capitalizing on our even stronger relationship with American Airlines, we are confident this resumed service will provide even more valuable links for commercial and cultural exchanges for our customers in both regions and beyond.”

“We are honored to welcome back Japan Airlines to Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport and are excited about the outstanding connectivity and customer service they will provide to passengers flying to Japan and throughout Asia,” said Sean Donohue, chief executive officer of DFW Airport. “With the addition of this new flight to Tokyo, coupled with partner American Airlines’ two daily flights, DFW Airport will further support our mission to connect the world to Dallas Fort Worth.”

 

American and JAL commenced their Pacific Joint Business partnership in April 2011, and have since greatly expanded customer benefits including better flight schedules, expanded codesharing, more coordinated services and greater access to a wider variety of fares.

JAL will offer a special bonus mile campaign for JAL Mileage Bank loyalty program members. For details, refer to the JAL website.

Copyright Photo: Fred Freketic/AirlinersGallery.com. Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner JA839J (msn 34853) taxies at New York’s JFK International Airport (JFK).

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British Airways announces a new Boeing 787-9 route to San Jose, California

British Airways (London) has announced that it will begin service between Mineta San Jose International Airport and London Heathrow Airport from May 4, 2016. This marks the first regularly scheduled nonstop service to the UK for the city of San Jose. British Airways will operate the newest aircraft in its fleet, a Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner, featuring the airline’s newly designed First cabin.

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San Jose will be the fourth Californian city from which British Airways flies, following Los Angeles, San Francisco and San Diego. Earlier this year British Airways introduced its super jumbo Airbus A380 onto San Francisco, providing customers with comfort, space and enhanced wellbeing for their trip to London.

 

Flight BA279 will touch down in San Jose for the first time at 6:05 pm in the evening of May 4, 2016 and BA278 will depart San Jose at 8:00 pm the same evening, arriving into London Heathrow Terminal 5 at 2:05 pm the next day.

 

The airline’s 787-9 Dreamliner will accommodate eight customers in the new First cabin, 42 seats in Club World, 39 in World Traveller Plus and 127 in World Traveller. Lower pressurization means less dry cabin air, leaving customers feeling more refreshed with less jet lag while the aircraft’s smooth ride technology reduces the effect of turbulence. Soothing mood lighting in every cabin gradually adjusts to reflect the time of day and the large windows feature electronic dimming switches.

The 787-9, the first of which is due to be delivered to British Airways in September, is 20 feet longer that its 787-8 predecessor, so as well as offering World Traveller (economy), World Traveller Plus (premium economy) and Club World (business class), there’s also room for a new First class cabin – a first for the airline’s 787 fleet.

Copyright Photo: AirlinersGallery.com.

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Norwegian to add two additional Boeing 787-9 Dreamliners, 787 fleet going to 19

Norwegian Air Shuttle (Norwegian Long Haul) (Oslo) has entered into an agreement for the delivery of two new 344-seat Boeing 787-9 Dreamliners. This agreement means the Norwegian carrier will have a total of 19 Dreamliners in its long-haul fleet by 2018.

According to the carrier:

“Norwegian continues to build up long-haul fleet for further international growth and has entered into agreements to lease two long-haul Boeing 787-9 Dreamliners. The new aircraft are planned to enter service in the summer of 2017. Norwegian has currently eight Boeing 787-8 Dreamliners in the fleet and now another 11 Dreamliner 787-9s on order. This means that the company will have a fleet of 19 long-haul aircraft of which four will be delivered in 2016, five in 2017 and two in 2018.

 

The aircraft are leased by the Norwegian wholly owned subsidiary Arctic Aviation Assets.

Copyright Photo: SM Fitzwilliams Collection.

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KLM modifies its Boeing 787 order

KLM 787-9 (14)(Flt)(KLM)(LRW)

KLM Royal Dutch Airlines (Amsterdam) has changed its order for six Boeing 787-9s to the larger 787-10.

According to the carrier, this is not an additional order. The aircraft are expected as of 2020.

Image: KLM.

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QANTAS to introduce the Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner in 2017 with the first of eight aircraft

QANTAS 787-9 (07)(Flt)(QANTAS)(LRW)

QANTAS Airways (Sydney) will enter a new era of global opportunities, fuel efficiency and passenger comfort when the Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner joins the QANTAS International fleet from 2017.

QANTAS logo (large)

The national carrier will acquire eight Boeing 787-9s to gradually replace five of its older Boeing 747-400s on QANTAS International routes and open up a range of potential new city pairs. Four Boeing 787-9s will arrive in financial year 2018 and four will arrive in financial year 2019. This will leave the QANTAS Group with its six youngest reconfigured Boeing 747-400s.

Announcing the decision after a rigorous assessment process, QANTAS confirmed it had met the strict conditions for re-investment in a new long haul fleet type:

  • A return to strong profitability for Qantas International in financial year 2015, with the business reporting underlying Earnings Before Interest and Tax of $267 million – a turnaround of $764 million compared with financial year 2014 – and Return On Invested Capital above its cost of capital.
  • Net debt reduction of $1.1 billion since financial year 2013.
  • A competitive business case, including a new agreement with Qantas’ long-haul
    pilots. This agreement incorporates a 30 per cent productivity increase.

QANTAS will retain 15 further options and 30 purchase rights for additional Boeing 787s, with significant flexibility over the timing of delivery should they be exercised.

QANTAS will work with its team of internal experts and external designers to develop worldleading cabin interiors for the new Dreamliner. This will add to the aircraft’s unique features, including improved cabin pressure, larger windows and technology to reduce turbulence.

QANTAS Boeing 787-9 Fact Sheet: CLICK HERE

Top Image: QANTAS.

Image Below: QANTAS. The Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner flight deck.

QANTAS 787-9 Flight Deck (QANTAS)(LRW)

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Air Canada reports a record second quarter net profit

Air Canada (Montreal) reported record second quarter adjusted net income of $250 million (1) (all amounts are reported in Canadian dollars) or $0.85 per diluted share compared to adjusted net income of $139 million or $0.47 per diluted share in the second quarter of 2014, an improvement of $111 million or approximately 80 percent. EBITDAR(1) (earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, amortization and aircraft rent) amounted to $591 million compared to EBITDAR of $456 million in the same quarter in 2014, an increase of $135 million or approximately 30 per cent year-over-year. The airline recorded an EBITDAR margin of 17.3 per cent compared to an EBITDAR margin of 13.8 per cent in the second quarter of 2014, an improvement of 3.5 percentage points. On a GAAP basis, Air Canada reported record second quarter operating income of $323 million compared to operating income of $245 million, an improvement of $78 million or approximately 32 per cent from the second quarter of 2014. An operating margin of 9.5 per cent in the second quarter of 2015 reflected an improvement of 2.1 percentage points from the same quarter in 2014.

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“We again expect to deliver record results in the third quarter, with EBITDAR margin expansion versus prior year higher than the 350 basis point expansion recorded in the second quarter. Demand continues to be robust moving into, historically, our most important quarter given the travel demands and patterns of our North American customers. Our capacity additions for the year, which are largely in our international markets, are important contributors to our increased profits and remain consistent with our plan established in a higher fuel price environment. Our plan is not dependant or conditional on fuel prices staying at the current levels; and the transformative changes we have made over the last several years provide us with the cost structure, fleet and flexibility to respond not only to increased competition in any of our key markets, but also to weaknesses in the Canadian dollar or a downturn in the economy. If we see demand weakening, we can adjust quickly. We are building a resilient airline for the long-term, a sustainably profitable company and global industry leader,” said Mr. Rovinescu.

Second Quarter Income Statement Highlights

In the second quarter of 2015, on capacity growth of 9.3 per cent, system passenger revenues of $3.082 billion increased $117 million or 3.9 per cent from the second quarter of 2014. Traffic growth of 8.7 per cent reflected traffic increases in all of Air Canada’s five geographic markets. A yield decline of 5.0 per cent, consistent with the anticipated yield impact stemming from the implementation of the airline’s strategic plan, reflected an increase in average stage length of 3.4 per cent, which had the effect of reducing system yield by 1.9 percentage points, a higher proportional growth of lower-yielding international-to-international passenger flows in support of the airline’s international expansion strategy, a higher proportion of seats into long-haul leisure markets, and a reduction in carrier surcharges relating to lower fuel prices, particularly where carrier surcharges are regulated. The favourable impact of a weaker Canadian dollar on foreign currency denominated passenger revenues increased passenger revenues by approximately $61 million in the second quarter of 2015. Passenger revenue per available seat mile (PRASM) decreased 5.5 per cent from the second quarter of 2014 on the lower yield and, to a much lesser extent, a passenger load factor decline of 0.5 percentage points.

In the second quarter of 2015, operating expenses of $3.091 billion increased $31 million or 1.0 per cent from the second quarter of 2014 on the capacity growth of 9.3 per cent. The increase in operating expenses reflected the impact of the weaker Canadian dollar and capacity-related cost increases largely offset by the impact of lower jet fuel prices. The second quarter of 2015 included impairment charges of $14 million and favourable tax-related provision adjustments of $23 million while the second quarter of 2014 included favourable tax-related provision adjustments of $41 million (the impairment charges and tax-related provision adjustments are excluded from adjusted net income and adjusted CASM results). The unfavourable impact of a weaker Canadian dollar on foreign currency denominated operating expenses (mainly U.S. dollars) in the second quarter of 2015, when compared to the second quarter of 2014, increased operating expenses by approximately $134 million (comprised of $73 million in aircraft fuel expense and an aggregate of $61 million in non-fuel operating expenses).

Air Canada’s cost per available seat mile (CASM) decreased 7.6 per cent from the second quarter of 2014. The airline’s adjusted CASM(1), which excludes fuel expense, the cost of ground packages at Air Canada Vacations® and unusual items (such as the impairment charges and the tax-related provision adjustments discussed above) increased 0.7 per cent from the second quarter of 2014, in line with the 0.25 to 1.25 per cent increase projected in Air Canada’s news release dated May 12, 2015. Had the Canadian-U.S. dollar exchange rate remained at 2014 levels, adjusted CASM would have decreased 1.8 per cent when compared to the second quarter of 2014.

Financial and Capital Management Highlights

At June 30, 2015, unrestricted liquidity (cash, short-term investments and undrawn lines of credit) amounted to $3.283 billion (June 30, 2014 – $2.954 billion).

Adjusted net debt amounted to $4.896 billion at June 30, 2015, a decrease of $236 million from December 31, 2014 as higher cash and short-term investments balances more than offset the increase in long-term debt and finance lease balances (including current portion). The airline’s adjusted net debt to EBITDAR ratio was 2.3 at June 30, 2015 versus a ratio of 3.1 at December 31, 2014.

In the second quarter of 2015, net cash flows from operating activities totaled $509 million, an improvement of $123 million from the second quarter of 2014. Free cash flow(1) amounted to $299 million, $335 million higher than the second quarter of 2014. This increase reflected a decrease in capital expenditures of $212 million and the higher cash flows from operating activities.

For the 12 months ended June 30, 2015, return on invested capital (ROIC(1)) was 16.2 per cent versus 11.0 per cent for the 12 months ended June 30, 2014.

Current Outlook

EBITDAR Margin

For the third quarter of 2015, Air Canada expects to deliver record results, with EBITDAR margin expansion versus prior year higher than the 350 basis point expansion recorded in the second quarter of 2015.

Capacity

Air Canada expects third quarter 2015 system ASM capacity, as measured by available seat miles (ASMs), to increase 9.5 to 10.5 per cent when compared to the third quarter of 2014, and to be comprised of an increase in the total number of seats dispatched (system) of 6.5 to 7.5 per cent and an increase in system average stage length (measured by ASMs divided by seats dispatched) of approximately 3.0 per cent when compared to the same quarter in 2014.

Air Canada continues to expect its full year 2015 system ASM capacity to increase by 9.0 to 10.0 per cent. For the full year 2015, Air Canada continues to expect an increase in the total number of seats dispatched (system) of 6.0 to 7.0 per cent and an increase in average stage length (system) of approximately 3.0 per cent when compared to the full year 2014. Approximately 55 per cent of the 2015 forecasted capacity increase will be through the continued lower-cost growth of Air Canada rouge® while approximately 38 per cent of the capacity growth will be targeted to international markets operated by the mainline carrier.

Air Canada now expects its full year 2015 domestic ASM capacity to increase by 3.0 to 4.0 per cent when compared to 2014 as opposed to the 3.5 to 4.5 per cent increase projected in Air Canada’s May 12, 2015 news release, primarily the result of minor schedule changes. The year-over-year growth in full year 2015 domestic ASM capacity is largely focused on the airline’s transcontinental services, reflecting, in large part, the positioning of certain Boeing 777 and 787 aircraft at Air Canada’s major hubs in Toronto and Vancouver. Furthermore, in 2015, an overlap of the aircraft brought into the fleet to replace the exiting Embraer 190 aircraft is expected to account for approximately 30 per cent of the projected domestic capacity growth in 2015. This overlap is designed to better match capacity with expected 2015 summer season demand. For the full year 2015, Air Canada now expects an increase in the total number of seats dispatched (domestic) of 2.0 to 3.0 per cent and an increase in average stage length (domestic) of approximately 1.0 per cent when compared to the full year 2014.

Adjusted CASM

For the third quarter of 2015, Air Canada expects adjusted CASM (which excludes fuel expense, the cost of ground packages at Air Canada Vacations and unusual items) to decrease by 0.5 to 1.5 per cent when compared to the third quarter of 2014.

For the full year 2015, Air Canada now expects adjusted CASM to decrease 1.0 to 2.0 per cent from the full year 2014 as opposed to the decrease of 1.5 to 2.5 per cent projected in Air Canada’s May 12, 2015 news release, reflecting, in large part, the impact of a weaker Canadian dollar on U.S. denominated operating expenses.

Major Assumptions

Air Canada’s outlook assumes relatively low Canadian GDP growth for 2015. Air Canada also expects that the Canadian dollar will trade, on average, at C$1.30 per U.S. dollar in the third quarter of 2015 and C$1.27 for the full year 2015 and that the price of jet fuel will average 62 cents per litre for the third quarter of 2015 and 64 cents per litre for the full year 2015.

For the full year 2015, Air Canada also expects:

  • Depreciation, amortization and impairment expense to increase by $125 million from the full year 2014 as opposed to the increase of $100 million projected in Air Canada’s May 12, 2015 news release. The increase in projected depreciation, amortization and impairment expense is largely driven by the impairment charges recorded in the second quarter of 2015.
  • Employee benefits expense to increase $30 million from the full year 2014 (as opposed to the increase of $50 million projected in Air Canada’s May 12, 2015 news release). The lower expected increase in employee benefits expense is primarily driven by benefit plan amendments relating to U.S. post-retirement health plans which reduced employee benefits expense by $19 million in the second quarter of 2015.
  • Aircraft maintenance expense to increase $90 million as opposed to the $120 million increase projected in Air Canada’s May 12, 2015 news release. The lower expected increase in aircraft maintenance expense is mainly driven by the timing of engine maintenance events when compared to 2014 and certain contract amendments.

(1) Non-GAAP Measures

Below is a description of certain non-GAAP measures used by Air Canada in order to provide readers with additional information on its financial and operating performance. Such measures are not recognized measures for financial statement presentation under Canadian GAAP and do not have standardized meanings and may not be comparable to similar measures presented by other public companies. Refer to Air Canada’s Second Quarter 2015 MD&A for reconciliation of non-GAAP financial measures.

Adjusted net income (loss) and adjusted net income (loss) per diluted share are used by Air Canada to assess the overall financial performance of its business without the effects of foreign exchange, net financing income (expense) relating to employee benefits, mark-to-market adjustments on fuel and other derivatives and unusual items as these items may distort the analysis of certain business trends and render comparative analysis to other airlines less meaningful. Air Canada also uses adjusted net income as a measure to determine return on invested capital.

EBITDAR is commonly used in the airline industry and is used by Air Canada to assess earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, amortization, impairment and aircraft rent as these costs can vary significantly among airlines due to differences in the way airlines finance their aircraft and other assets.

Adjusted CASM is used by Air Canada to assess the operating and cost performance of its ongoing airline business without the effects of fuel expense, the cost of ground packages at Air Canada Vacations and unusual items, as such expenses may distort the analysis of certain business trends and render comparative analysis to other airlines less meaningful.

Free cash flow is used by Air Canada as an indicator of the financial strength and performance of its business because it shows how much cash is available for such purposes as repaying debt, meeting ongoing financial obligations and reinvesting in Air Canada.

Return on invested capital (ROIC) is used by Air Canada to assess the efficiency with which it allocates its capital to generate returns. Return is based on adjusted net income (loss) (as referred to in the paragraph above), excluding interest expense and implicit interest on operating leases. Invested capital includes average year-over-year total assets, net of average year-over-year non-interest-bearing operating liabilities, and the value of capitalized operating leases (calculated by multiplying annualized aircraft rent by 7).

Notes:

(1)
Adjusted net income (loss) and adjusted net income (loss) per share – diluted are non-GAAP financial measures. Refer to section 16 “Non-GAAP Financial Measures” of Air Canada’s Second Quarter 2015 MD&A for additional information.
(2)
EBITDAR (earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, amortization, impairment and aircraft rent) is a non-GAAP financial measure. Refer to section 16 “Non-GAAP Financial Measures” of Air Canada’s Second Quarter 2015 MD&A for additional information.
(3)
Unrestricted liquidity refers to the sum of cash, cash equivalents, short-term investments and the amount of available credit under Air Canada’s revolving credit facilities. At June 30, 2015, unrestricted liquidity was comprised of cash and short-term investments of $3,021 million and undrawn lines of credit of $262 million. At June 30, 2014, unrestricted liquidity was comprised of cash and short-term investments of $2,615 million and undrawn lines of credit of $339 million.
(4)
Free cash flow (cash flows from operating activities less additions to property, equipment and intangible assets) is a non-GAAP financial measure. Refer to section 7.5 “Consolidated Cash Flow Movements” of Air Canada’s Second Quarter 2015 MD&A for additional information.
(5)
Adjusted net debt (total debt less cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments plus capitalized operating leases) is an additional GAAP financial measure. Refer to section 7.3 “Adjusted Net Debt” of Air Canada’s Second Quarter 2015 MD&A for additional information.
(6)
Return on invested capital (“ROIC”) is a non-GAAP financial measure. Refer to section 16 “Non-GAAP Financial Measures” of Air Canada’s Second Quarter 2015 MD&A for additional information.
(7)
Except for the reference to average number of FTE employees, operating statistics in this table include third party carriers (such as Jazz Aviation LP (“Jazz”) and Sky Regional Airlines Inc. (“Sky Regional”)) operating under capacity purchase agreements with Air Canada.
(8)
Adjusted CASM is a non-GAAP financial measure. Refer to section 16 “Non-GAAP Financial Measures” of Air Canada’s Second Quarter 2015 MD&A for additional information.
(9)
Reflects FTE employees at Air Canada. Excludes FTE employees at third party carriers (such as Jazz and Sky Regional) operating under capacity purchase agreements with Air Canada.
(10)
Average stage length is calculated by dividing the total number of available seat miles by the total number of seats dispatched.
(11)
Revenue passengers are counted on a flight number basis which is consistent with the IATA definition of revenue passengers carried.

Copyright Photo: Rob Rindt/AirlinersGallery.com. A beautiful portait of Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner C-GHPU (msn 35259) departing from Vancouver International Airport (YVR).

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El Al to order and lease up to 15 Boeing 787 Dreamliners

El Al Israel Airlines (Tel Aviv) intends to become a new Boeing 787 operator.

El Al logo (LRW)

Boeing has issued this statement:

Boeing logo (medium)

Boeing is pleased that El Al Israel Airlines has announced its intent to purchase and lease up to 15 787 Dreamliners, with purchase rights for 13 additional airplanes. When finalized, the order will be posted to the Boeing Orders & Deliveries website.

Copyright Photo: Brandon Farris/AirlinersGallery.com.

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