Tag Archives: Qatar Airways

Delta: Gulf carriers concede huge subsidies

Delta Air Lines (Atlanta) is striking back with a new rebuttal in the on-going dispute over alleged government subsidies between the U.S. “Big Three” (American, Delta and United) and the Gulf “Big Three” (Emirates, Etihad and Qatar). Here is Delta’s new statement:

Delta logo

Gulf carriers have effectively conceded they have received tens of billions of dollars in subsidies and other benefits from their governments. That’s just part of what the Partnership for Open & Fair Skies revealed Monday in its 400-page response to the U.S. Department of Transportation that disproves statements to the contrary by Emirates, Etihad Airways and Qatar Airways, and demonstrates real harm to U.S. carriers and jobs.

The Wall Street Journal reported Monday, “The Abu Dhabi government last year injected $2.5 billion into Etihad Airways … in violation of air treaties with the U.S. government. The previously undisclosed cash injection is detailed in state-owned Etihad’s financial statements, which were made public on Monday by the Partnership.”

The article quoted Jill Zuckman, chief spokesperson for the Partnership for Open & Fair Skies that represents Delta, American, United and several labor groups, including the Air Line Pilots Association.

“Etihad’s own financials prove that it is not a commercially viable enterprise and owes its continued existence to massive government subsidies from the United Arab Emirates,” Zuckman said.

The Street on Tuesday also cited the Partnership’s filing when it reported on harm Gulf carriers are causing U.S. airlines and their partners.

“In four U.S. gateway cities – Boston, Dallas, Seattle and Washington, D.C. – the combined decline in the year after Emirates began service to its Dubai hub ranged between 8 and 21 percent,” the article stated.

Zuckman again was quoted: “Not only have the Gulf carriers failed to meaningfully stimulate new traffic, but the data clearly show losses — that entry by a Gulf carrier into a U.S. gateway city is followed by an actual decline in U.S. carrier bookings. The subsidized Gulf carriers are distorting the global marketplace, harming the U.S. airline industry and threatening American jobs and airline service to communities across the U.S.”

Open and Fair Skies logo

Click to view the Partnership’s complete rebuttal filing.

In a Q&A with Politico this week, Delta CEO Richard Anderson explained how long-standing U.S. trade policy is relevant to this issue:

Normally when you have a bilateral trade relationship, whether it’s for aviation or steel or agricultural products, two countries enter into a bilateral trade negotiation so that both of them can stimulate the marketplace and enjoy access and enjoy the opportunity in kind of a roughly equal way, both parties. Their economies end up improving.

In this case, it’s been almost all a predominant share shift away from U.S. carriers onto the United Arab Emirates and Qatar traveling over Dubai, Abu Dhabi and Qatar to the Far East, to India and the Southeast.

Do you think it would be a whole lot better if we let foreign countries dump their agricultural products in here? Grocery prices would be lower, right? And why don’t we let steel companies? Why do we take any action? … And if we let steel in, General Motors’ and Ford’s car prices will go down.

That’s not been our trade policy. What our trade policy has been is to try to find that reasonable middle ground to make sure you don’t have any outliers in terms of dumping [because of] government-subsidized capacity. That’s why I think there’s a reasonable accommodation here with our government.

In January the Partnership issued a report illustrating that the three Gulf carriers have received more than $42 billion in subsidies and other benefits over the past decade from their home governments in violation of bilateral Open Skies policies.

The departments of Transportation and Commerce opened an official docket to collect public comment on the issue in June, to which thousands of submissions were made by the Aug. 3 deadline, including those by Gulf carriers that attempted to rebut, but did not disprove, massive government subsidies and other benefits.

Over the past several months an array of stakeholders including airline employees, mayors, governors, prominent aviation economists, business leaders, and members of Congress have weighed in, calling for the U.S. government to quickly open consultations with the United Arab Emirates and Qatar to ensure Open Skies agreements are being adhered to so all airlines can compete on a level playing field.

Qatar Airways submits a “white paper” to the U.S. Government in support of “Open Skies”

Qatar Airways (Doha) today issued this statement concerning its on-going battle with the U.S. “Big Three” concerning alleged government subsidies and Open Skies:

Qatar Airways logo

Qatar Airways has yesterday submitted a ‘White Paper’ to the United States Government which fully refutes the subsidy allegations levelled against it by the Big 3 US carriers.

The detailed submission comprehensively addresses and answers all issues raised in the ‘Open Skies’ debate, which has put into question the longstanding US policy of allowing carriers to fly to and from the United States with minimal government interference.

The Big 3 – American Airlines, Delta Air Lines and United Airlines (and their unions) have been pressing the US Government to depart from its pro-Open Skies stance and impose unilateral limits on the services operated by Gulf airlines, even though the U.S. Open Skies policy was specifically designed by the US Government to ensure that US carriers were free to operate their extensive networks without foreign government restrictions on the level and routings of the services they offer.

The biggest US carriers have made ample use of their behind-country (Sixth Freedom) traffic rights, and have fought hard to preserve their own access to those rights, and to carry Fifth Freedom (third country) traffic as well. Given that these policies were created by and for US carriers, it is ironic that they are now describing the use of these traffic rights to be “unfair” when exercised by Gulf carriers.

In its report, Qatar Airways demonstrates that the many of the market changes complained of by the Big 3 are not the product of “unfair competition” (or anything remotely related to subsidy), but are instead the byproduct of important advances in aircraft technology and significant demographic changes. With ultra-long range Boeing 777 and Boeing 787 aircraft, passengers bound for the Middle East and India can now over-fly congested European hubs, and enjoy convenient one-stop services to their destinations, instead of making longer two-and three stop journeys. These technological changes have shortened travel times, and have brought families and businesses closer together.

Qatar Airways also demonstrated that although US carrier market share to the Indian subcontinent may have shifted over time, the market as a whole has grown, and US carriers are carrying more traffic in absolute terms.

Qatar Airways also disproved the claim that its services harm any US carrier, noting that it does not compete against any US carrier on any nonstop route, and serves cities that have never been served by US carriers, such as Cochin, Karachi and Amritsar. In fact, the services operated by Qatar Airways benefit US carriers. Qatar Airways works cooperatively with and feeds traffic to US carriers, including American Airlines (its code-sharing and oneworld alliance partner) and JetBlue Airways. The report also proves that the airline’s operations to the US market have significantly contributed to the economy in terms of jobs, cargo and overall passenger traffic (tourism and business travel growth), as well as providing benefits for non-aligned US passenger carriers, cargo carriers and airports.

In addition to benefiting American travellers, Qatar Airways has strongly supported the US aerospace industry. As of today, the airline has 162 aircraft flying to 150 destinations, of which over 40 per cent are Boeing jets worth over $19 billion USD.
Qatar Airways Group Chief Executive, Mr. Akbar Al Baker, commented: “Qatar Airways was a relatively unknown airline when it first launched a service to the United States in 2007.

“Since then, we have built up a significant brand presence on the routes that we operate to the United States. Our passengers have come to know us, not through size alone, but by the signature service and quality of the product on board – and also the breadth of our network.

“There has been significant demand for our services from the U.S. not just to the Middle East – but beyond – where no other carriers fly. This makes us a natural choice for consumers, and is a reflection of how globalised our world has become. People are travelling further than ever before and it is important that in an economy focused on open market principles, our wings remain open for business, rather than closed.”
Qatar Airways also demonstrated that its services are lawful and consistent with the US-Qatar Agreement, which in Article 11.2 says that “neither Party shall unilaterally limit the volume of traffic, frequency or regularity of service, or the aircraft type or types operated by the designated airlines of the other Party.” Despite this clear language, the Big 3 are urging the US Government to ignore its obligations by imposing a unilateral limit on Qatar Airways’ capacity.

Other US airlines have noted that foreign governments often try to block competition from strong US airlines by challenging “excess” capacity offered by US carriers, and cautioned the US Government against deviating from a free trade policy that has worked to the overwhelming benefit of US airlines.

As Qatar Airways GCEO Mr. Akbar Al Baker observed: “The US Government should reject calls to “freeze” the US-Qatar Open Skies Agreement, and recognize these allegations for what they are – a transparent attempt by the Big 3 to block air services that compete with their own.”

Qatar Airways also examined and rebutted each of the subsidy allegations made, noting that US carriers benefit from many of the same policies they have attacked. Indeed, the claims of subsidy advanced by the Big 3 include items of support that US carriers have themselves received for decades, and items that have never been viewed as a form of subsidy. In fact, many other airlines (including US airlines) have acknowledged publicly that they and the Big 3 have themselves been long-time beneficiaries of subsidies and favorable US policies and support.

While Qatar Airways is used to strong competition, it expressed concern about the efforts of the Big 3 to persuade the US Government to refer to rules that do not apply to aviation to resolve their complaints. The application of WTO trade principles, and US domestic trade laws to these complaints – rules that apply solely to trade in goods – would be completely unlawful.

Qatar Airways GCEO Mr. Akbar Al Baker added:

“It is puzzling to see the biggest US carriers describe Qatar Airways as a “threat,” given our small size and lack of direct competition with them. Their long-standing focus on other markets, and large (and growing) profits completely undercut this claim. The Open Skies model was developed by the American carriers and has demonstrated how an Open Skies paves the way for an open economy. We are concerned to see the Big 3 seek to change the rules of the game as soon as they see US consumers respond well to the services offered by a competitor. Qatar Airways is proud of its signature five-star service, brand identity, and the high standards we deliver to our passengers onboard.”

Photo: Qatar Airways.

Qatar Airways aircraft slide show: AG Airline Slide Show

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Planely Speaking: Growing in the Gulf

Assistant Editor Aaron Newman

Assistant Editor Aaron Newman

Assistant Editor Aaron Newman

Growing the Gulf

By Aaron Newman.

A decade ago Emirates, Qatar Airways and Etihad Airways were irrelevant. But these three airlines have become increasingly dominate on the lucrative international long-haul market, causing angst for western legacy airlines and their respective governments. For example, Lufthansa claims its Frankfurt hub has lost nearly a third of its market share on routes between Europe and Asia since 2005, with more than 3 million people now flying annually from Germany to other destinations via Persian Gulf hubs (economist.com).

Growth of Gulf Airlines 1

This global turf war is only going to intensify as the gulf carriers continue expanding at breakneck speed. With hundreds of aircraft deliveries forthcoming (see graph below), Etihad, Emirates and Qatar Airways are destined to initiate new routes, utilizing a large order book of new aircraft scheduled. The major news outlets and our WorldAirlineNews.com have done a great job summarizing the discord between the gulf airlines and their global legacy counterparts. I’m going to use this opportunity to tackle a different question…where will these three airlines expand to next?

Gulf Airlines Fleet Size

In May, Doha based Qatar Airways (below) made headlines, announcing it will begin flying to Atlanta, Boston and Los Angeles in 2016. Qatar Airways also said it will increase service to New York, adding a second daily flight.

Copyright Photo: Antony J. Best/AirlinersGallery.com. Qatar Airways is the launch customer for the new Airbus A350-900. Airbus added Qatar titles to this test Airbus A350-941 F-WZNW (msn 004) pictured at Farnborough.

 

In late March, Emirates surprised the industry, announcing new daily service from Orlando (MCO) to Dubai beginning Sept. 2015.

 

Copyright Photo: Antony J. Best/AirlinersGallery.com. Etihad Airways Airbus A380-861 A6-APA (msn 166) departs from London (Heathrow).

And Etihad Airways (above), just finished a six city expansion in the beginning half of 2015 to; Algiers, Edinburgh, Entebbe, Hong Kong, Kolkata and Madrid. Looking at the charts above, it’s easy to see that additional future growth is inevitable. Adding frequencies, upgauging aircraft and expanding to new cities such as the ones listed below is bound to happen given these airlines current trajectories.

Mexico City, Mexico (MEX)

With a population of nearly 22 million people and one of the most important financial centers in Latin America, I foresee a gulf carrier announcing new service shortly before their new international airport is set to open in 2018. Given the distance from the Persian Gulf, this route may need a European stopover city to make this and other Latin America cities work in the future.

Vancouver, Canada (YVR)

A major gateway for pan-pacific trade, Vancouver offers the international diversity and business climate that the gulf carriers are attracted to. Emirates expressed interest in serving Vancouver in years past, those talks quickly diminished after Air Canada expressed concern. If discussions between the Canadian government and gulf carriers were to reignite, Vancouver would be a high priority for any gulf airline.

Sapporo, Japan (CTS)

Japan’s fourth largest city and the largest city on the northern island of Hokkaido; Sapporo’s airport has largely been underserved by airlines outside of the major East Asian hubs (Seoul, Tokyo, Hong Kong and Beijing). Alternatively, Fukuoka (FUK) would also be a viable option for a gulf carrier looking to add routes in Japan.

Stuttgart, Germany (STR)

Emirates has been working hard to make this route a reality, however, the German government is currently limiting the number of routes from gulf carriers into Germany in an effort to protect national carrier, Lufthansa. If the German government ever reconsiders, this will give Stuttgart a much needed long-haul route heading east. Berlin is a potential growth target as well, but I do not see this as a possibility until the completion of the delayed Brandenburg airport—currently scheduled for 2018.

Helsinki, Finland (HEL)

Finland’s largest city and capital, Helsinki offers the large population and thriving economy to make this route work. Competition from state-owned Finnair and the fast growing Norwegian Air Shuttle may be a deterrent to this route. I foresee Qatar Airways being the first airline to launch this route given the mutual Oneworld membership with Finnair.

London Stansted, UK (STN)

A stronghold for the UK’s low-cost airlines, Stansted’s owners and operators, Manchester Airports Group strongly desire to diversify by adding a full-service airline. About 6.7 million people live within a 1-hour drive of Stansted and 12 million within 2 hours. With slot restrictions at Heathrow and Gatwick, could this be a viable option to add frequencies into the London metro area?

Xi’an, China (XIY)

Xi’an’s pillar industries; equipment manufacturing, software development, aerospace technology, and high tech R&D are driving a blossoming economy in Xi’an. This route prediction may be a bit premature, however, gulf carriers will continue to tap into China’s growing middle class and flying to secondary Chinese cities. Chongqing, Wuhan, Xiamen, Kunming, and Qingdao should all be considered as future options.

Detroit, MI (DTW)

Detroit’s automotive industry supplies a large amount of lucrative business travel between Asia and the United States, Detroit also has about 400,000 residents of Middle East origin, the highest total for any U.S. city, with many from Lebanon, Iraq and Yemen. However, this route would be in direct competition with Delta and Skyteam members Air France and KLM. Has this competition kept these three airlines from stepping in?

Bamako, Mali (BKO)

Bamako’s annual growth rate is hovering around 4.5%, which makes it the sixth-fastest-growing city in the world, and the fastest on the African continent. African cities like Bamako have become important for gulf carriers because of their location between the continent and Asia, which are developing commercial links. While few Africa-Asia routes generate enough traffic for direct flights, Persian Gulf carriers can funnel small numbers of people from many places through the airlines’ hubs.

My list above is purely speculation from an industry enthusiast, but I’d also like to hear your thoughts below in the comments section. Where do you see or where do you want to see these airlines expanding to in the future and why?

Qatar Airways announces the seventh flight to London Heathrow

Qatar Airways (Doha) continues to expand. Starting on October 25, the fast-growing Gulf carrier is increasing the weekly frequencies on the Doha – London (Heathrow) route from 42 weekly flight to 46 weekly flights, meaning it will operate seven flights a day on key days of the week. This includes double-daily Airbus A380 (above) operations on the route.

Qatar Airways logo

In other news, on July 1 Qatar Airways launched its second new destination of the year, touching down in the Spice Island of Zanzibar. Zanzibar is the airline’s third route in Tanzania, following Dar-es-Salaam and Kilimanjaro.

Qatar Airways will initially operate five weekly flights to Zanzibar via Kilimanjaro, and commencing October 1, 2015, the airline will offer an additional two weekly flights making it a daily operation. Out of the daily flights from October, passengers will be able to fly nonstop to Zanzibar three-times-a-week and on a linked flight via Kilimanjaro four-times-a-week.

Qatar Airways is operating an Airbus A320 in a two-class configuration on the Zanzibar-Doha route, with 12 seats in Business Class and up to 132 seats in Economy.

Additionally the flag carrier has announced network frequency increases to multiple destinations across its global network.

The national airline is adding frequencies to its popular routes – Dubai (UAE), Jeddah (Saudi Arabia), Peshawar (Pakistan), Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia), Belgrade (Serbia), Sofia (Bulgaria), Asmara (Eritrea), Djibouti (Djibouti), Najaf (Iraq), Luxor (Egypt), Salalah (Oman) and Zanzibar (Tanzania) all of which are launching over the coming months.

From July 16, Qatar Airways will increase its frequency on the Doha – Dubai route with one additional daily flight, taking its capacity up to 15 services a day to Dubai International Airport (DXB), which also takes the total frequency to DXB and DWC to 19 flights a day. Dubai has the highest frequency in the airline’s route network and this popular Gulf destination is currently served 126 times a week.

Flights to destinations in the Middle East has also increased with an additional daily flight during Ramadan to Jeddah in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; from June 18, services to Jeddah have risen from double-daily flights to triple-daily flights.

The third daily flight to Jeddah is being operated with an all-premium First Class service. The Airbus A319 aircraft fitted with an all First Class, single aisle, 2–2 seating configuration with 40 seats.

Qatar Airways will also be strengthening its commitment to Pakistan. After the recent announcement to launch flights to three new destinations (Sialkot, Faisalabad and Multan), the airline is expanding further in Pakistan with Peshawar moving from three weekly flights to daily flights effective from October 1.

The popular Far East destination of Kuala Lumpur, which is currently served 21 times-a-week, will have three additional flights from July 2 to August 29, helping to supplement busy travel demands during this summer season.

The Sofia-Belgrade linked route, which is currently served with five flights a week, will see an increase to daily flights when it adds two more flights commencing July 2.

Starting from July 1, Qatar Airways will initially operate five weekly flights to Zanzibar via Kilimanjaro, and commencing October 1, the airline will offer an additional two weekly flights making it a daily operation to Zanzibar. Out of the daily flights from October, passengers will be able to fly non-stop to Zanzibar three-times-a-week and on a linked flight via Kilimanjaro four-times-a-week.

Expansion in Africa includes one additional weekly flight to both Asmara and Djibouti from July 1 and July 3 respectively. Service to Luxor in Egypt will increase with one more weekly flight effective from November 1, 2015 to March 20, 2016.

Najaf in Iraq will be operated with two additional weekly flights from July 15 taking its frequency to 10 weekly flights. From September 18, four additional weekly flights will be launched to Najaf making it a double-daily operation.

In addition, Qatar Airways will operate three more weekly flights to popular tourist destination Salalah from October 6.

The airline now serves 147 worldwide destinations with 161 aircraft.

Copyright Photo: SPA/AirlinersGallery.com. Qatar Airways’ Airbus A380-861 A7-APA (msn 137) climbs majestically away from the runway at London’s Heathrow Airport.

Qatar Airways aircraft slide show: AG Airline Slide Show

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Qatar Airways orders 10 Boeing 777-8Xs and four 777F freighters

Qatar 777X (Boeing)(LR)

Boeing (Chicago, Seattle and Charleston) and Qatar Airways (Doha) announced an order for 10 additional 777-8Xs and four 777 Freighters (below), valued at $4.8 billion at list prices, on the opening day of Paris Air Show 2015.

Qatar Airways logo

The 777X builds on the passenger-preferred and market-leading 777, as well as offering more market coverage and revenue capability than the competition. The 777X will include new engines, an all-new composite wing and will leverage technologies from the 787 Dreamliner.

The 777X family includes the 777-8X and the 777-9X, both designed to respond to market needs and customer preferences.

Boeing logo (medium)

According to Boeing, “the 777-9X will be 12 percent more fuel efficient than the competition, necessary in today’s competitive environment. The 777-8X is 5 percent more efficient than its competitor at all ranges while providing for new network opportunities. Design of the 777X is underway and production is set to begin in 2017, with first delivery targeted for 2020. With this order, the 777X has accumulated 320 orders and commitments from six customers worldwide.”

Copyright Photo below: AG Airline Slide Show

Qatar Airways aircraft slide show: TMK Photography/AirlinersGallery.com. Boeing 777-FDZ A7-BFB (msn 36100) is pictured at Toronto (Pearson).

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It is that time of the year again: The 2015 Paris Air Show at Le Bourget Airport is here

Paris Air Show 2015 logo

Yes, it’s that time of year again. The International Paris Air Show returns. 106 years old and 50 shows on, number 51 is here and it promises to be another great show.

For those who don’t know, the Paris Air Show is a bi-annual event, with the Farnborough Air Show filling in the gap year, in which aircraft manufacturers from around the world, both civil and military, showcase their latest and greatest models to potential buyers and the viewing public; that is the ones that can afford to go. But don’t worry, if you can’t attend, World Airline News will be giving you day to day coverage of the new aircraft orders that are due to come in next week.

Here is a preview of what is to come.

Airbus logo (large)
We’ll start with the “home team”. Airbus comes to the show with a line up of commercial aircraft. With its A319, A320, A380 and A350-900 XWB all being on the static display, the Toulouse-based manufacturer will also fly its long-haul aircraft, surprisingly all in the grey and burgundy livery of Qatar Airways (below).

Above Copyright Photo: Bernhard Ross/AirlinersGallery.com. Qatar Airways Airbus A350-941 A7-ALA (msn 006) is seen at Frankfurt, its first destination from Doha.

The A319 and A320 aircraft are not part of Airbus’ official roster, with both showcasing Qatar’s all business class cabin and the A320 displaying the Doha-based airline’s newly upgraded cabins including its 180-degree lie flat-beds, new 15.4 inch smart monitors and touch-screen remote control handsets as well as power, USB ports and connectivity for smart devices in Business Class.

Last time around, Airbus secured $68.7 billion worth of business for a total of 466 aircraft, which shows the resilience of the commercial aviation industry. The deals comprise Memorandum of Understanding agreements (MOUs) for 225 aircraft worth $29.4 billion and firm purchase orders for 241 aircraft worth $39.3 billion. The previous time around, the A350 was a brand new airliner and only made a cameo visit, flying briefly over Le Bourget Airport as a treat to the public. This time it’s goes into next week with three of new type in service with Qatar Airways and others soon to be delivered to Vietnam Airlines, Finnair and TAM respectively.

Video above: Airbus. Before the show, Airbus is featuring the first Airbus A330 delivery to Tunisair. More videos are expected next week.

For the A380, it may be “make or break” time. With orders for the Super Jumbo slowing down (none in the past year) and also with the delaying and deferring of delivery dates by some customers, Airbus will be hoping to attract new orders for their double-decker giant or more from their established customers. Airbus is reported to be looking at a revamp of the aircraft towards the end of this year. Could an A380neo or sharklet equipped variant be in the cards for next week? Seems a bit desperate in my opinion. The aircraft isn’t 10 years old yet. It took the rest of Airbus’ in service aircraft 27 years (A320) and 24 years (A330 – expected neo introduction) to introduce a major upgrade to its DNA. Either the A380 takes off again or it doesn’t (pun intended).

Airbus will also be looking to get some firm orders for it’s newest project, the A330neo. Since being launched at the Farnborough Air Show last year the new wide-body only has seven customers in Avolon, AirAsia X, Delta Air Lines, CIT Group, ALC, Hawaiian Airlines and TransAsia Airways. Other guaranteed orders will be for the Airbus’ A320 and A320neo types, with the latter due to have its first delivery by October of this year with Qatar Airways.

Boeing logo (medium)

Above Copyright Photo: Royal S. King/AirlinersGallery.com. Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner VN-A861 (msn 35151) arrives back at Paine Field near Everett, Washington in Vietnam Airlines colors after a test flight.

The other side of the aviation coin, U.S. manufacturer Boeing comes to the show with three of it’s aircraft: The Boeing 777-300 ER (in China Airlines livery) and both variants of the 787 Dreamliner. The 787-9 makes it’s Paris debut in the colors of Vietnam Airlines (above), with the aircraft set to join the carrier soon after it leaves the show.

China Airlines 777-300 N5017Q (B-18002)(95)(Ldg) LBG (Boeing)(LRW)

Photo Above: Boeing. Boeing 777-36N ER N5017Q (msn 43980) lands at Le Bourget Airport today. It will eventually become B-18002 for China Airlines.

As previously reported, the aircraft manufacturer released this stunning practice video (above).

The other two aircraft will be in the livery of China Airlines and guess whose colors the other is wearing? If you didn’t guess Qatar Airways, you need to keep up with the latest trends. Qatar Airways is really stealing the show this time around.

Boeing recently released figures predicting a demand for 38,050 new airplanes over the next 20 years, an increase of 3.5 percent from last year’s forecast. As we previously reported, Boeing released its annual Current Market Outlook (CMO) on June 11, estimating the total value of those new airplanes at $5.6 trillion.

Do the manufacturers stack up potential orders and MOUs prior to the show to release them during the show? The “numbers game” is important to the manufacturers.

Last time around in Paris, Boeing fell to second place with firm and provisional orders for 442 aircraft valued at more than $66 billion, narrowly behind Airbus. That was the year Boeing launched the 787-10 and 777X projects and will be hoping to rack up huge orders for their new long-haulers; with the stretched Dreamliner only having seven customers in ALC, Singapore Airlines, United Airlines, International Airlines Group/British Airways, Etihad Airways, ANA-All Nippon Airways and GECAS.

Qatar 777X (Boeing)(LR)

Image above: Boeing. Qatar Airways also has placed an order for the new 777X.

The 777X is doing just as well with only six customers in Lufthansa, Etihad, Emirates, Cathay Pacific, Qatar Airways and ANA.

Boeing’s narrow-bodies are another miss for the show but you can guarantee an order for the 737NG and 737 MAX will be flying in (again, pun intended) and most likely carrying Boeing’s orders.

Another big miss for the show is the Boeing 747-8. The type is in the same situation as the A380, with orders slowing down and production most likely set to slow down once more from the current 1.5 aircraft per month. It’s quite surprising the manufacturer isn’t trying to advertise their “Sky Queen” to the best of their ability.

Bombardier logo
The eye catchers of the show are, without a doubt, Bombardier. Trying to steal Qatar Airways’ thunder by bringing along their CRJ1000 variant for the third show running, the Q400 NextGen and both of it’s CSeries family: the CS100 and the CS300, are both making their Farnborough debuts and are being included in the flying display.

Video above: Bombardier. The first CS100 in Swiss livery heads to Paris.

The first delivery of the CSeries Family will be to Swiss International Air Lines. The first copy is due to happen next year, and the CS100 will pay a visit to Zurich shortly after the show as a sample of what’s to come for the Lufthansa subsidiary. The CS300 will also visit Bombardier’s Belfast facility on June 19 where Bombardier’s employees and partners eagerly await the arrival of the first CS300 aircraft. It will mark the first time the CSeries aircraft and its Belfast-produced wing will fly on site. Last time around, Le Bourget Airport wasn’t a happy hunting ground for the Canadians, with the CSeries failing to capture a single aircraft order, the CRJ only capturing one order from Arik Air, and the Q400 only securing orders from Alaska Airlines (Horizon Air) and Arik Air. Bombardier will hope for a major improvement  and for this year to be more like Farnborough of last year, where a total of 74 orders were captured.

Video above: The Bombardier CS300 ferries to Le Bourget Airport.

Video above: The Q400 in Falcon Aviation livery heads to Paris.

Video above: The CRJ manufacturing at the Montreal Mirabel plant.

The rest of the major players: ATR, Embraer and Sukhoi, will display one aircraft each. With the Brazilians displaying their ERJ 135, the French-Italians showing off their ATR 72-600 in the colors of Air New Zealand Link, and the Russians exhibiting the Superjet 100 in the colors of Interjet, marking the second anniversary of the first aircraft being delivered to the airline.

ATR logo

For ATR it’s more of the same, marketing their ATR 42 and 72 products. Le Bourget 2013 went down as the best show in ATR’s history, with the turboprop manufacturer announcing orders for 173 planes, including 83 firm orders, with the total value of the contracts exceeding $4.1billion; creating a new record for them. Unless they’re planning a shock reveal of the ATR 42/72-700/800/900, it will be business as usual.

Video above: The building of Lion Group’s 50th ATR 72-600.

Embraer logo-1

For Embraer they will hope 2015 is just as good for them as Paris 2013 was. Two years ago, the E-Jets E2 was officially launched and they were the standout performers of the show, taking Day 1 by storm with the E2 dominating the orders when they announced the sale of over 300 customers, with the majority belonging to SkyWest Airlines and ILFC, and the rest going to unnamed customers around the world. For them, it is a case of gaining more orders for the E2 and maybe current generation of E-Jets.

 

Video above: Embraer. Embraer E2 – The Power of 2.

Sukhoi displayed this Superjet 100 at the Paris Air Show.  Copyright Photo: Gerd Beilfuss.

Sukhoi displayed this Superjet 100 at the previous Paris Air Show. Copyright Photo: Gerd Beilfuss.

Sukhoi logo

For Sukhoi, it’s the same situation. 2013 only got the SuperJet one order from Ilyushin Finance, with two of those aircraft going to VLM at some point next year. They will hope to go one better than the big zero they got last year at Farnborough.

The non-flying aircraft of the show: the Irkut MC-21 and the COMAC C919, may bring in a few orders at the show but only time will tell.

The Financial Times told us not to expect much from this year’s aviation event; but don’t let that deter you from keeping up to date on proceedings at Le Bourget Airport. We’ll be watching in anticipation and ready to update you on anything and everything. Nous vous verrons la semaine prochaine.

Assistant Editor Oliver Wilcock reporting from Manchester.

Video below: Boeing. Boeing is celebrating its historic relationship with the United Kingdom prior to the show:

 

Qatar Airways to take the Miami route to daily as it celebrates the first anniversary

Qatar Airways (Doha) today celebrates the first anniversary of the Doha – Miami route. The new route has been a success for the carrier. The airline will take the route to daily service on November 18. The company issued this statement:

Qatar Airways logo

Today, Qatar Airways, a proud member of the oneworld alliance, celebrates one year of nonstop service between Miami International Airport and Hamad International Airport in Doha. Due to a successful first year and an increase in passenger demand, Qatar Airways will increase from five flights per week to daily flights along this route, beginning November 18, 2015.

Qatar Airways is the only carrier to offer a nonstop flight between Miami and the Middle East, connecting South Florida to over 140 destinations around the world via its state-of-the-art hub in Doha.

“Miami and Doha share a vibrant love of art, fashion and music,” said Vice President of the Americas, Gunter Saurwein. “With a kinship for travel, both cities have so much to contribute to one another. The immense demand along this route has exceeded our expectations and we are very pleased to offer daily flights this fall.”

Both Doha and Miami are essential components of the worldwide aviation network. Through Doha’s centralized location and modern services at Hamad International Airport, travelers from Miami can reach cities such as Bangkok, Colombo, Jakarta, and Mumbai in an impressive 20 hours or less through a quick transfer in Doha. Similarly, travelers can connect seamlessly to key destinations in both North and South America from Miami.

Qatar Airways’ Miami to Doha route is operated with a Boeing 777-300 ER in a two-class configuration of 42 seats in Business Class and 293 seats in Economy Class.

While increasing flights in Miami, Qatar Airways also recently announced plans to launch service to new destinations across the United States. The airline plans to commence daily, nonstop flights between Doha and Los Angeles on January 1, Boston on March 16 and Atlanta on July 1 in 2016.

Qatar Airways has seen rapid growth in just 18 years of operation, to the point where today it is flying a modern fleet of over 150 aircraft to 146 key business and leisure destinations across Europe, the Middle East, Africa, Asia Pacific, North America and South America.

Copyright Photo: SPA/AirlinersGallery.com. Boeing 777-3DZ ER A7-BAC (msn 3610) climbs away from Heathrow Airport in London.

Qatar Airways aircraft slide show: AG Airline Slide Show