Category Archives: Lauda Air

Austrian Airlines/Tyrolean Airways retires the last Boeing 737 on April 2

Austrian Airlines (operated by Tyrolean Airways) (Vienna) retired its last Boeing 737 with the last flight being operated with Lauda Air (Vienna) Boeing 737-8Z9 OE-LNK (msn 28178). This also retires the Lauda brand although Lauda was officially merged into Austrian on July 1, 2012.

The company issued this statement:

The final Boeing 737 in the Tyrolean Airways fleet celebrated its departure on April 2. The aircraft, which bears the registration OE-LNK, is the last to bear the Lauda Air design. This means the fleet harmonization, during which eleven Boeing 737 aircraft have been replaced with seven Airbus A320 over the last seven months, is now complete. Tyrolean Airways now has a unified fleet on its medium-haul routes, consisting of 29 aircraft of the Airbus A320 fleet family. The company Lauda Air was merged with Austrian Airlines already last year. In the private travel segment, the power of the Austrian brand has been used to greater effect both nationally and internationally since the beginning of this year, with the launch of the ‘my Holiday’ product.

“This is an important milestone for our future competitiveness,” declared Austrian CEO Jaan Albrecht. “The fleet harmonization is an essential building block in the restructuring program of the Austrian Airlines Group.” Thanks to the unified fleet on medium-haul routes, Tyrolean Airways can enhance a number of essential synergies. Double costs for maintenance and spare parts are no longer necessary, for example, training for pilots can be standardised, and the aircraft can be deployed more productively in the network schedule. This all results in savings of around
17 million euros.

Airbus on medium-haul routes

There were a variety of different reasons for the decision to opt for Airbus on medium-haul during the fleet harmonization. The Austrian Airlines Group had twice as many Airbus A320 in its fleet as it did Boeing 737. This meant the phasing out of the Boeing 737 involved lower costs, because fewer pilots and technicians needed to be retrained.

In addition to this, the Austrian Airlines Group already had larger sub-fleets within the Airbus A320 fleet, which could be operated more efficiently than the Boeing 737 sub-fleets. As well as this, the Austrian Airlines Group can benefit more from synergies within the Lufthansa Group by using the A320 on its medium-haul routes.

Dates, facts and the history of the Boeing 737 in the Austrian Airlines Group The first Boeing 737-200, registration OE-ILE, took to the air for Lauda Air in the autumn on 1985. In the years that followed, Lauda Air incorporated a succession of Boeing 737 aircraft into its fleet, but each in different versions. After the takeover of Lauda Air, Austrian Airlines had a total of eleven Boeing 737 “Next Generation” and one Boeing 737-400 “Classic” in its fleet. The final Boeing 737-400 “Classic” was phased out of the fleet in 2004.
The Boeing 737 was mainly used to carry charter traffic at Lauda Air and Austrian. Since the spring of 2010, it has also been used on scheduled routes of Austrian Airlines. To make this possible, the Boeing 737 was repainted in the Austrian colors. Just one Boeing 737-800, bearing the registration OE-LNK, continued to fly under the Lauda Air colors, to enable the company to retain its AOC, or “Air Operator Certificate”.

The Boeing 737 “Next Generation” used at Lauda Air and Austrian Airlines flew over 300,000 flight hours in total between 1998 and 2013. The Boeing 737 was used for around 8 flight hours every day in the Austrian Airlines Group. That corresponds to 4.5 landings a day.

Before the fleet harmonization, the Austrian Airlines Group had seven Boeing 737-800s, two Boeing 737-600s and two Boeing 737-700s in its fleet.

Overview of the fleet of the Austrian Airlines Group :

The Austrian Airlines Group currently has 74 aircraft in its operative fleet (all except one operated by Tyrolean):

• Long-haul:

4 Boeing 777-200 (one operated by Austrian)
6 Boeing 767-300

• Short- and medium-haul:

6 Airbus A321
16 Airbus A320
7 Airbus A319
14 Fokker 100
9 Fokker 70
12 DHC-8-400

Copyright Photo: Andi Hiltl. Pictured at Zurich, Boeing 737-8Z9 WL OE-LNK (msn 28178) wore the Lauda colors until the end.

Austrian: AG Slide Show

Lauda: AG Slide Show

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Austrian Airlines moves all aircraft (except one) to Tyrolean Airways, Austrian Arrows name being retired

Austrian Airlines (Vienna) as of midnight July 1, 2012 moved all flight operations to lower-cost subsidiary Tyrolean Airways (Innsbruck), including all of the long-range flights. One former Lauda Air Boeing 777-2Z9 (OE-LPB) was kept on the Austrian certificate to maintain its official “airline” status.

The company issued this statement:

“As of July 1, 2012, there will be joint flight operations under the unified Austrian brand name.

The objective: achieving competitive framework conditions enabling profitable operations

All of the flight operations of the Austrian Airlines Group, which has a fleet of some 80 aircraft, are now bundled at its 100% subsidiary Tyrolean Airways. As of July 1, 2012 Tyrolean is also operating the long-distance fleet.

For customers, the so-called “operational transition” will not result in any essential changes. The “Austrian” brand will remain on all aircraft. The flight numbers will also bear the “OS” airline code, as was the case in the past. However, travel agencies and tickets will provide notification on the identity of the operator of the aircraft undertaking all medium and long-distance flights based on the supplementary annotations “VO” or “operated by Tyrolean”. The supplementary brand “arrows” found on Tyrolean Airway aircraft will successively be removed by the end of 2012.

What has happened in detail:

• Aircraft fleet: 22 airplanes of the A320 family, 7 Boeing 737s, 6 Boeing 767s and 3 Boeing 777s changed their operators within the Austrian Airlines Group on midnight of July 1, 2012. One Boeing 777, OE-LPB, will stay with Austrian Airlines. This is due to international traffic laws. The outplacement of the fleet of the seven Boeing 737 medium-range airplanes still on hand and the “in-placement” of the seven Airbus A320s forms part of the harmonization of the fleet of medium-range aircraft which is being continued.

• Organization: The organization of the entire flight operations is to be bundled in Tyrolean Airways. Austrian Airlines retains such key responsibilities as station management, the technical department, sales in Austria and abroad, as well as such management departments as network planning, personnel, finances and marketing. There will be no changes in ownership. “Tyrolean Airways Tiroler Luftfahrt GmbH” remains a 100% subsidiary of Austrian Airlines AG.

• Austrian Airlines retains its operation authorization, and remains the user of traffic rights. The flights will be performed under the OS flight numbers. However, they will be “operated by Tyrolean”. Austrian Airlines serves some 50 countries from Vienna. No further permits or licenses need to be secured in a large number of countries. This is due to the fact, amongst other reasons, because prevailing legal regulations, especially in the European Union, generally permit this. For countries outside Europe, the requisite approvals have been secured.

• Personnel: some 460 pilots and 1,500 flight attendants are changing their employer within the Group. They will be transferred from Austrian Airlines to Tyrolean Airways. 110 pilots and 214 flight attendants have, in the final analysis, left the company. As a whole, Austrian has 900 pilots and 2,000 flight attendants, including the Tyrolean employees.  The employees will not experience any changes in working environments and remuneration. Tyrolean currently has a work force of about 1,500 employees, which will increase to 3,500 employees as a consequence of the operational transition. The Austrian Airlines Group employs approximately 6,700 people.

• Flight plan: to compensate for the departure of the pilots, a series of temporary measures were implemented for the summer flight plan:

• Retraining: The removal of 4 Boeing 737 airplanes from the fleet leaves 31 Boeing 737 pilots available. They have already been trained to fly Airbus A320 airplanes. The cessation of part-time work at Tyrolean has freed 36 Tyrolean co-pilots for other duties. These pilots, who were trained to fly Fokkers, have already been retrained to handle Airbus aircraft.

• Leasing of airplanes: Austrian Airlines will temporarily lease five airplanes from Lufthansa, Augsburg Airways, Contact Air und Welcome Air (wet leases). Lufthansa will provide a 139-seat Boeing 737-300 to fly the OS routes between Vienna and Düsseldorf and between Vienna and Rome in July and August. Lufthansa will assume responsibility for Vienna-Dubai-Vienna in July by flying a 241-seat Airbus 340-300. In a further move, the Salzburg-Frankfurt route, which has been served by Austrian acting under a commission from Lufthansa, will be operated by Lufthansa itself using a Boeing 737-300 for the first two weeks in July. Contact Air will fly a Fokker 100 seating 100 passengers to two of the four daily OS routes between Vienna-Zurich-Vienna and Vienna-Varna-Vienna. This aircraft would have originally been flown as a “wet lease” under a commission of Austrian’s associate SWISS. Augsburg Airways, which is part of the Lufthansa Group, will temporarily assume responsibility for one of the four flights serving the route between Vienna-Munich-Vienna and for two of the total of three flights on the Vienna-Stockholm-Vienna route during the period July 15 – August 31. 2012. Welcome Air will use a further a 31-seat Dornier 328 to carry out flights between Vienna and Klagenfurt, Salzburg and Prague, in addition to the existing four of the five flights between Linz und Vienna. Passengers will receive Austrian’s on-board services. Austrian will make use of the longer on-ground times by having Austrian Technik conduct maintenance work.

• Freelancers: Some of those pilots that have made use of the privileged termination of employment will be provided with work on a temporary and case-by-case basis.

The reorganization is based on the operational transition is a key component of the EUR 220 million restructuring program presented in January 2012. The objective of the program is the modernization of the structures of Austrian Airlines, so as to bring and sustainably keep Austria’s largest domestic airline in the profit zone.”

Bottom line: Austrian Airlines (under orders from parent Lufthansa) needed to reduce its cost structure and this dramatic move will probably accomplish this goal.

Top Copyright Photo: Michael B. Ing. Sister-ship Boeing 777-2Z9 ER OE-LPC (msn 29313) is now being operated for Austrian Airlines by Tyrolean Airways.

Austrian Airlines: 

Austrian Arrows-Tyrolean Airways: 

Lauda Air: 

Bottom Copyright Photo: Gerd Beilfuss. Boeing 777-2Z9 OE-LPB (msn 28699) when it was with Lauda Air.

Lufthansa receives final approval for Austrian

Lufthansa (Frankfurt) yesterday (August 28) was given EU Commission approval to acquire the Austrian Airlines Group. Austrian Airlines (Vienna), Lauda Air and Tyrolean Airways (Austrian Arrows) will be integrated into the Lufthansa Group in September.

Press release:

konzern.lufthansa.com/en/html/presse/pressemeldungen/index.html?c=nachrichten/app/show/en/2009/08/957/HOM&s=0