Tag Archives: LHR

Air Malta to add five new routes for the summer 2018 season

Malta - airmalta.com (Air Malta 2nd) Airbus A319-111 9H-AEL (msn 2332) LHR (SPA). Image: 926424.

Air Malta will start operating a twice weekly scheduled service to the city of Malaga every Monday and Friday from March 26, 2018. This is the first time that the Maltese airline is introducing scheduled services to the city and through this route, Air Malta will be resuming its services to Spain.

The flight schedule will operate as follows:

Monday

KM590

Dep.

Malta

19:35

Arr.

Malaga

22:30

KM591

Dep.

Malaga

23:30

Arr.

Malta

02:15

 

 

Friday

KM590

Dep.

Malta

05:25

Arr.

Malaga

08:20

KM591

Dep.

Malaga

09:10

Arr.

Malta

11:55

 

 

Air Malta will also be operating twice-weekly summer service to Lisbon (effective March 25, 2018), and weekly service to St. Petersburg (March 30, 2018) and Stockholm (Arlanda) (May 1, 2018) and three weekly flights to Venice (March 26, 2018).

Copyright Photo: Malta – airmalta.com (Air Malta 2nd) Airbus A319-111 9H-AEL (msn 2332) LHR (SPA). Image: 926424.

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Ex-Virgin Atlantic G-VWOW is now with Virgin Orbit as N744VG “Cosmic Girl”

Ex-Virgin Atlantic G-VWOW

Virgin Orbit is the newest member of the Virgin Group:

“We are the newest member of the Virgin family, and we are thrilled to be here! Our team is hard at work launching the smallsat revolution. Right now, our engineering-driven team are integrating rockets, filling up our launch manifest, preparing for our initial orbital flights, and yes, finding time here and there to build out a full website. While we get that last one finished up, here’s a bit more about our technology, our mission, and our team.”

Virgin Orbit continues;

WE ARE IN THE FINAL STAGES OF TESTING AND PREPARATION FOR LAUNCHERONE, A TWO-STAGE, EXPENDABLE, LOX/RP-1 ROCKET THAT LAUNCHES FROM OUR MOBILE AIR LAUNCH PAD, A DEDICATED 747-400 CARRIER AIRCRAFT, CALLED COSMIC GIRL.

Cosmic Girl will carry LauncherOne to an altitude of approximately 35,000 feet before release for its rocket-powered flight to orbit. Starting each mission with an airplane rather than a traditional groundbased launch pad offers performance benefits in terms of payload capacity, but more importantly, air-launch offers an unparalleled level of flexibility.

LauncherOne will operate from a variety of locations independently of traditional launch ranges—which are often congested with traffic—and will have the ability to operate through or around weather conditions and other impediments that delay traditional launches.

Once released from the carrier aircraft, the LauncherOne rocket fires up its single main stage engine, a 73,500 lbf, LOX/RP-1 rocket engine called the “NewtonThree.” Typically, this engine will fire for approximately three minutes. After stage separation, the single upper stage engine, a 5,000 lbf LOX/RP-1 rocket engine called the “NewtonFour” will carry the satellite(s) into orbit. Typically, the second stage will execute multiple burns totaling nearly six minutes.

At the end of this sequence, LauncherOne will deploy our customers’ satellite (or satellites) into their desired orbit. Both stages of LauncherOne will be safely deorbited, while the carrier aircraft will return to a predetermined airport, where it can be quickly prepared for its next flight.

LauncherOne is capable of delivering 300 kilograms to a 500 kilometer Sun-Synchronous Orbit.

  • TO LEARN ABOUT THE VEHICLE’S CAPACITY TO OTHER ORBITS OR OTHER TECHNICAL STATS, CHECK OUT OUR SERVICE GUIDE.

We have built LauncherOne from a blend of classic, proven techniques and tailored high-tech investments. Both the NewtonThree and the NewtonFour are highly reliable liquid rocket engines designed, tested, and built by Virgin Orbit. We are at the forefront of hybrid manufacturing, automated flight safety systems, composite structures, and ultra-responsive launch operations—cutting edge developments that allow us to offer unparalleled service to the small satellite market.

Videos:

Top Copyright Photo: Virgin Orbit Boeing 747-41R N744VG (msn 32745) (Virgin Atlantic colors) LGB (Michael B. Ing). Image: 939465.

Virgin Atlantic:

Bottom Copy Photo: Virgin Atlantic Airways Boeing 747-41R G-VWOW (msn 32745) LHR (Keith Burton). Image: 911204.

Virgin Atlantic Airways Boeing 747-41R G-VWOW (msn 32745) LHR (Keith Burton). Image: 911204.

 

British Airways to welcome the 25th Dreamliner

British Airways Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner G-ZBJF (msn 38613) LHR (SPA). Image: 924483.

British Airways is set to mark a milestone aircraft delivery on Friday (September 29), as it welcomes the 25th Dreamliner into its fleet.

The Boeing 787-8 aircraft will be making its maiden voyage to the airline’s Heathrow home with the flight number BA8625. It will depart Boeing’s Seattle factory on Thursday September 28 at 6.05pm local time and will land at Heathrow at 11.15am local time the following day.

The three cabin aircraft, with the registration G-ZBJI, will be the ninth 787-8 to join the airline’s fleet. British Airways also has 16 787-9s.  Two further 787-9 aircraft and three 787-8 aircraft will be delivered in 2018, followed by 12 787-10s to arrive between 2020 and 2023.

Captain Stephen Riley, British Airways’ director of flight operations, will be taking delivery of the aircraft, he said: “It is a great privilege to be the Captain flying to Heathrow in our newest aircraft. Some two-and-a-half years of work goes into the delivery of a new aircraft so it’s an exciting moment when we finally fly it home to join the fleet.

“The Dreamliners are fantastic aircraft both to fly as a pilot and to enjoy as a customer. They are incredibly technologically advanced and the most fuel efficient long-haul aircraft. They’ve also been designed with travellers’ comfort in mind, which means customers arrive at their destination feeling great.”

To find out more information about what goes on behind the scenes of a delivery flight, watch an interview with Captain Stephen Riley ahead of his trip to Seattle to collect the 787 aircraft.

Video:

The 787s are the most technologically advanced aircraft in British Airways’ fleet. The aircraft consists of a carbon fibre fuselage, which allows the pressure to be maintained at a lower level in the cabin. The internal cabin altitude is the equivalent of 6,000ft, which is 2,000ft lower than on other aircraft. This leads to greater humidity, reducing the drying effect of the cabin air, so customers arrive feeling more refreshed.

One of the most unique features on the Dreamliner is its wings, with a span of 197 feet (60 meters) the curvature allows the aircraft to climb better and increases fuel efficiency. The Dreamliner can also reach a maximum speed of 954 kilometres per hour with a range of 15,200 kilometres, allowing the airline to fly to destinations further afield such as Santiago in Chile and Mumbai in India.

The windows in the 787 are thirty per cent bigger than any other aircraft. It means customers can maintain eye level with the horizon, which lessens motion sickness. It is also around 40 per cent quieter than other aircraft, giving customers the ideal environment to get some shuteye.

British Airways took delivery of its first Dreamliner, a 787-8, in July 2013.The aircraft is made up of three cabins World Traveller, World Traveller Plus and Club World. Two years later, in 2015, the airline took delivery of the next generation of the Boeings Dreamliner, a 787-9. This aircraft is 20 foot longer than the 787-8, allowing room for the airline to add a First cabin on board with an evolution of its First class seat.

Visit British Airways’ 360 degree interactive tour of its Dreamliner here.

Top Copyright Photo: British Airways Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner G-ZBJF (msn 38613) LHR (SPA). Image: 924483.

United announces the last Boeing 747 revenue flight

United Airlines Boeing 747-422 N128UA (msn 30023) NRT (Michael B. Ing). Image: 923735.

United Airlines made this announcement:

In celebration of United Airlines retiring the Boeing 747 from its fleet, United flight 747, on Tuesday, November 7, 2017 from San Francisco to Honolulu will be the airline’s farewell flight to the 747 fleet.

This journey will serve as the ultimate throwback for customers, employees and invited guests as it recreates the first 747 flight operated by United in 1970. From a 1970s-inspired menu to retro uniforms for flight attendants to inflight entertainment befitting of that first flight, passengers will help send the Queen of the Skies off in true style. The original United 747 aircraft that first made this journey from San Francisco to Honolulu was named the “Friend Ship,” the same name bestowed on this farewell flight.

Seats on this special, one-way trip, United flight 747, are available for purchase now at united.com or through the United app. The seats in the upper deck will not be sold, giving all guests the opportunity to spend time in this iconic space.

Customers seated in United Polaris first class and United Polaris business class will be entered into a drawing that will take place at the gate prior to boarding for an opportunity to occupy one of a select number of seats in the upper deck during the flight.

The journey will begin with a gate celebration at 9 a.m. local time at San Francisco International Airport, featuring a Boeing 747 gallery, remarks from United employees and executives, as well as refreshments. The flight will depart San Francisco International Airport at 11 a.m. local time, landing at Honolulu International Airport at 2:45 p.m. local time. Upon landing in Honolulu, local employees will welcome the aircraft with final festivities to close out the historic day. Customers and fans of the Queen of the Skies are encouraged to use the #UA747Farewell hashtag in social media posts.

United and the Boeing 747 through the Years

April 13, 1966: Boeing announces it will build a 490-passenger 747 transport. Construction is set to begin in June on a new plant in Everett, Washington.

January 3, 1967: The first production workers for the 747 program arrive in Everett. The 50,000 who would produce the world’s largest civilian airplane were known as The Incredibles, and they earned the label by bringing the Jumbo Jet dream to reality in only 16 months.

September 30, 1968: The first Boeing 747-100, City of Everett, is rolled out at their Washington plant, painted with the insignias of the 27 airlines that had already ordered the aircraft including United.

February 9, 1969: The Boeing 747-100 makes its first flight.

January 21, 1970: The Boeing 747 makes its first commercial flight from New York to London for Pan American World Airways.

June 26, 1970: Continental Airlines becomes one of the first carriers to put the Boeing 747 into U.S. domestic service, flying from Chicago to Los Angeles and onward to Honolulu.

June 26, 1970: United Airlines receives its first Boeing 747-100 complete with a christening ceremony fit for a luxury liner.

July 23, 1970: United makes its first Boeing 747 commercial flight, with a trip from San Francisco to Honolulu.

United Airlines Boeing 747-122 N4710U (msn 19755) JFK (Bruce Drum). Image: 101357.

Above Copyright Photo: United Airlines Boeing 747-122 N4710U (msn 19755) JFK (Bruce Drum). Image: 101357.

Airline Color Scheme - Introduced 1972 (4 Star Friendship)

Above Copyright Photo: United Airlines Boeing 747-122 N4728U (msn 19925) “747 Friend Ship” LAX (Bruce Drum). Image: 103100.

 

January 1977: A modified Boeing 747-100 is delivered to NASA to serve as a carrier vehicle for the Space Shuttle.

April 22, 1985: United announces its plan to acquire Pan Am’s Pacific routes, as well as 11 Boeing 747SP planes. The 747SPs feature a 48-foot-shorter body and fly higher, faster, and farther than standard 747 models.

United Airlines Boeing 747SP-21 N149UA (msn 21649) MIA (Bruce Drum). Image: 101362.

Above Copyright: United Airlines Boeing 747SP-21 N149UA (msn 21649) MIA (Bruce Drum). Image: 101362.

January 29-30, 1988: Friendship One, a Boeing 747SP owned by United Airlines, sets the around-the-world air speed record of 36 hours, 54 minutes, and 15 seconds. This special flight raises $500,000 for children’s charities through the Friendship Foundation. Tickets cost a minimum of $5,000, and special guest passengers included astronaut Neil Armstrong, famed test pilots Bob Hoover and Lieutenant General Laurence C. Craigie, and Moya Lear, the widow of Lear Jet founder Bill Lear.

June, 1989: United Airlines receives their first Boeing 747-400 which provides increased range.

United Airlines Boeing 747-422 N117UA (msn 28810) LHR (Antony J. Best). Image: 920997.

Above Copyright Photo: United Airlines Boeing 747-422 N117UA (msn 28810) LHR (Antony J. Best). Image: 920997.

August 23, 1990: The first of two modified Boeing 747-200Bs is delivered to the Air Force for presidential transport. Better known as Air Force One, these planes still serve the president today, having replaced the Boeing 707-320Bs that had served as the presidential aircraft for almost 30 years.

September 1996: A 747SP previously flown by United is transformed into NASA’s SOFIA, or Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, which carries a 17-ton, 8-foot-wide infrared telescope mounted behind an enormous sliding door.

United Airlines Boeing 747-422 N179UA (msn 25158) SFO (Mark Durbin). Image: 901763.

Above Copyright Photo: United Airlines Boeing 747-422 N179UA (msn 25158) SFO (Mark Durbin). Image: 901763.

June 28, 2014: Boeing delivers the 1,500th 747 to come off the production line. The 747 aircraft is the world’s first wide-body airplane in history to reach the 1,500 production units milestone.

January 11, 2017: United announces that it will retire the Boeing 747-400 fleet in the last quarter of 2017.

July 28, 2017: United schedules a special domestic flight from Chicago O’Hare to San Francisco to allow more people to say farewell to the Queen of the Skies.

October 29, 2017: United flies its last international 747 flight from Seoul to San Francisco.

November 7, 2017: United celebrates the retirement of the Boeing 747 with a fitting full-circle moment. A special retro event sees the aircraft flying from San Francisco to Honolulu—a nod to its first-ever flight back in 1970.

Top Copyright Photo: United Airlines Boeing 747-422 N128UA (msn 30023) NRT (Michael B. Ing). Image: 923735.

United Airlines (historic liveries):

United Airlines (current livery – Boeing):

Endangered Species List:

Kuwait Airways retires the last Airbus A340-300

Kuwait Airways Airbus A340-313 9K-AND (msn 104) LHR (SPA). Image: 925234.

Kuwait Airways (Kuwait City) quietly operated its last Airbus A340-300 revenue flight on July 31, 2017. Flight KU 156, with the pictured 9K-AND, departed Istabul (Ataturk) at 03:30 am and arrived at 06:44 am local time at the Kuwait City base according to Flightaware.

Kuwait operated four of the type, with the first, 9K-ANA, delivered on March 29, 1995. The new type was assigned to the New York and Manila routes via multi stops.

Copyright Photo: Kuwait Airways Airbus A340-313 9K-AND (msn 104) LHR (SPA). Image: 925234.

American begins a strategic relationship with China Southern Airlines

China Southern Airlines Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner B-2733 (msn 34927) LHR (Antony J. Best). Image: 921994.

American Airlines on March 28, 2017announced it has committed to make a $200 million (US) equity investment in China Southern Airlines, creating a strong foundation for a long-term relationship between two of the world’s biggest carriers. China Southern is the largest airline in China and is the ideal carrier for American, the largest airline in the world, to build a relationship within this critically important market.

 

China Southern’s primary hub is located in Guangzhou (CAN) with the majority of its transpacific flights positioned there, while American flies to Beijing (PEK) and Shanghai (PVG) from its hubs in Chicago (ORD), Dallas Fort Worth (DFW) and Los Angeles (LAX). The carriers are planning to give travelers not only the amenities, features and the products that they want at different price points, but also a bigger network that serves the markets to which they want to travel.

Later this year, the two carriers expect to begin codeshare and interline agreements that will give customers access to many more destinations in China, as well as North and South America. American customers will be able to access nearly 40 destinations beyond Beijing and more than 30 destinations beyond Shanghai. China Southern customers will gain access to almost 80 destinations beyond LAX, San Francisco (SFO), and New York’s Kennedy Airport (JFK) in North and South America. The expected codeshare routes are anticipated to include the ability to earn and redeem AAdvantage® Miles, through-bag checking and the ability to book travel on a single ticket. The planned routes operating under the interline agreement are anticipated to include through-bag checking to the traveler’s final destination.

American currently offers daily service from DFW to Hong Kong (HKG), PEK and PVG; LAX to HKG and PVG; and ORD to PEK and PVG. All flights to PEK and PVG are operated on the airline’s state-of-the-art Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner (below), while its HKG flights are operated using its flagship Boeing 777-300. American also has Chinese-speaking flight attendants and offers fully lie-flat seats in first and business class cabins on all of its transpacific flights between China and the U.S.

American Airlines Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner N807AA (msn 40625) LAX (Michael B. Ing). Image: 933327.

Above Copyright Photo: American Airlines Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner N807AA (msn 40625) LAX (Michael B. Ing). Image: 933327.

American Airlines aircraft slide show:

Top Copright Photo: China Southern Airlines Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner B-2733 (msn 34927) LHR (Antony J. Best). Image: 921994.

China Southern Airlines aircraft slide show:

United Airlines moves up the retirement date of its last Boeing 747

United Airlines Boeing 747-422 N177UA (msn 24384) LHR (Keith Burton). Image: 910644.

United Airlines today (January 11) issued this statement to its employees:

“There’s something very special about a Boeing 747. It’s the one aircraft that even casual travelers can easily identify. And we know that the experience of traveling on one, or flying one, is unforgettable.

As deeply connected as we all are to this iconic aircraft, the time has come to retire our 747 fleet from scheduled service. Last March, we announced that this would occur by the end of 2018; now we plan to operate our last 747 flight in the fourth quarter of this year.

It’s a bittersweet milestone — this jumbo jet with its unmistakable silhouette once represented the state-of-the-art in air travel. Today, there are more fuel-efficient, cost-effective and reliable widebody aircraft that provide an updated inflight experience for our customers traveling on long-haul flights.

For these reasons, we’re saying farewell to the Queen of the Skies, which has been part of our fleet since we first flew the aircraft between California and Hawaii in 1970.

We’ll be working with all of you who fly or work on the 747s to ensure a smooth transition to other fleets. Our forward-looking fleet plan will cover 747 replacements and anticipated growth opportunities. And of course, we’ll honor the 747 with an unforgettable retirement celebration — we’ll keep you posted with more details on her final flight in the months ahead.

Thank you for all that you are doing. I am so proud and excited about the great future we’re building together as we create the best airline in the world.

Sincerely,

Scott Kirby – President, United Airlines

Copyright Photo: United Airlines Boeing 747-422 N177UA (msn 24384) LHR (Keith Burton). Image: 910644.

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