Category Archives: Norwegian Air Shuttle

Norwegian’s new route to Bergen from Manchester takes off

Norwegian’s newest route to Scandinavian took off on October 28 with a new nonstop service from Manchester to Norway.

Passengers travelling out on Norwegian’s new service to Bergen were welcomed at check-in at Manchester Airport with an inaugural celebration to mark the new route.

The new twice-weekly seasonal service on a Monday and Friday from Manchester Airport to Bergen offers consumers more choice when travelling with Norwegian to Scandinavia.

In addition to the new service, Norwegian already operates three non-stop routes to Scandinavia from Manchester Airport with three weekly flights to Oslo, two weekly flights to Stavanger and two weekly flights to Stockholm. Along with the new route the airline will now offer nine weekly flights to Scandinavia from Manchester.

Norwegian began operating from Manchester Airport in 2011 and all flights are served by new 186 seat Boeing 737-800 aircraft, offering all passengers free gate-to-gate Wi-Fi and live TV.

Flight schedule – all times local

Monday – DY1345 departs Manchester 12.15 arrives Bergen 14.55

Monday – DY1344 departs Bergan 10.50 arrives Manchester 11.30

Friday – DY1345 departs Manchester 20.50 arrives Bergen 23.30

Friday – DY1344 departs Bergan 19.30 arrives Manchester 20.10

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Norwegian reports its best ever quarterly result with a profit before tax of NOK 2.2 billion

Norwegian Air Shuttle has issued this financial report:

Norwegian’s third quarter results are characterised by improved profitability, higher unit revenue, lower unit cost and reduced growth, in line with the strategy. Profit before tax improved by 38 percent to NOK 2.2 billion compared to the same quarter last year.

Unit revenue and revenue per passenger kilometer (yield) both increased by 3 percent this quarter. Total revenue was NOK 14.4 billion, an increase of 8 percent from the same period last year, primarily driven by intercontinental growth. Norwegian carried approximately 10.5 million passengers; a reduction of 3 percent due to lower capacity. The load factor was 91.2 percent, up 0.7 percentage points.

Norwegian’s key priority is returning to profitability through a series of measures, including an optimised route- and base portfolio and an extensive cost-reduction program. The production growth (ASK) in the third quarter was 3 percent, down from the peak growth of 48 percent in the second quarter of 2018. The company’s internal cost reduction program, #Focus2019, continues with full force with an achieved cost reduction this quarter of NOK 827 million. The company expects to achieve a cost-reduction of NOK 2.3 billion for the year through #Focus2019.

“Norwegian’s third quarter results show that we are delivering on our strategy of moving from growth to profitability. We are delivering record-high earnings, record-high operating revenue and reduced unit cost, even when hit by operational issues outside of our control,” said Acting CEO and CFO of Norwegian, Geir Karlsen. “I would also like to commend everyone at Norwegian for contributing to delivering on our cost-reductions,” he added.

As Norwegian’s international foothold has continued to grow, the United States is now the largest market in terms of revenue, followed by Norway, Spain and the UK.

Since 2008, Norwegian has reduced the per passenger CO2 emissions by 30 percent. During the third quarter, Norwegian’s CO2 per passenger kilometre was 69 grams – unchanged from the same period previous year, due to the use of older wet-leased aircraft caused by the grounding of the 737 Max 8 fleet. The passenger climate impact will also be reduced going forward as more new aircraft enter the fleet. With an average age of only 3.8 years, Norwegian’s fleet is one of the most fuel efficient and modern in the world.

Norwegian and JetBlue announce intent for partnership

Norwegian and JetBlue have signed a Letter of Intent (LOI) for an interline agreement.

The partnership will allow customers to combine low fares in a convenient single booking for connecting flights between Europe and the Americas. Customers will have the possibility to book connecting flights on both airlines’ websites by combining the best of the complementary and expansive networks. The partnership is planned to launch in early Summer 2020 and bookable in early 2020.

The partnership will connect more than 60 U.S. and nearly 40 Caribbean and Latin American cities to Norwegian’s network via New York-JFK, Boston and Fort Lauderdale airports. Norwegian currently offers more than 20 nonstop routes to Europe from these three airports. Customers will also be able to check in their luggage to their final destination.

Flights will be bookable during the first half of 2020 through both airlines’ websites and travel agents using the GDS booking system.

Norwegian offers close to 50 nonstop transatlantic routes from the United States and more than 550 routes overall with access to most European destinations via connections within Norwegian’s network at any time of the year.

Photo: Norwegian.

Norwegian discontinues its transAtlantic Boeing 737 MAX routes

Norwegian.com (Norwegian Air Sweden) Boeing 737-8 MAX 8 SE-RTE (msn 42838) BFI (Joe G. Walker). Image: 947301.

Norwegian has made this announcement:

Norwegian will discontinue its transAtlantic routes originally operated by the Boeing 737 MAX aircraft this September. The decision follows months of substitute aircraft and wetlease operations covering the airline’s routes due to the global grounding of the 737 MAX aircraft. There are no changes to the 46 nonstop routes operated by the Dreamliner from the United States to Europe.

“Since March, we have tirelessly sought to minimize the impact on our customers by hiring, so called wetleasing, replacement aircraft to operate services between North America and Ireland. However, as the return to service date for the 737 MAX remains uncertain, this solution is unsustainable,” said Matthew Robert Wood, Senior Vice President Commercial Long-Haul and New Markets, Norwegian.

In March, Norwegian managed to implement a back-up plan within 24 hours of the Boeing 737 MAX grounding, accommodating all customers booked on the airline’s 737 MAX routes from both New York Stewart International Airport and Providence, as well as launch the new route from Hamilton/Toronto, Canada, to Dublin.

Nonstop services to Cork and Shannon ended in March with the grounding of the 737 MAX aircraft and passengers were rerouted to Dublin flights out of both Providence and Stewart. The service to Dublin from the two U.S. cities and, also Hamilton, Canada, continued, but will now end with the last flight from the U.S. – both Providence and Stewart – on September 14, arriving in Dublin on September 15. The last flight from Hamilton, Canada, will depart September 13. Norwegian will no longer operate any substitute aircraft for the 737 MAX.

This will not affect the airline’s other long-haul services, operated by its Boeing 787 Dreamliner fleet. Norwegian currently operates 46 routes from the U.S. to Europe this summer season, more than any other European airline.

Norwegian would like to thank the partners that made it possible to launch its transatlantic MAX operations back in 2017, specifically the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, New York Stewart International Airport, Providence’s T.F. Green Airport and Tourism Ireland, as well as the John C. Munro Hamilton International Airport.

Top Copyright Photo: Norwegian.com (Norwegian Air Sweden) Boeing 737-8 MAX 8 SE-RTE (msn 42838) BFI (Joe G. Walker). Image: 947301.

 

Norwegian’s financial turnaround moves in the right direction: Increased revenue and reduced cost

Norwegian Air Shuttle (Norwegian.com) (Norwegian Long Haul) Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner LN-LNR (msn 38784) (Freddie Mercury, British Rock Legend) LAX (Michael B. Ing). Image: 946965.

Norwegian has made this announcement:

Norwegian’s second quarter results are characterized by reduced growth and improved profitability, in line with the company’s strategy. Despite the reduced production growth and grounding of the Boeing 737 MAX aircraft, the underlying operating result before ownership costs more than doubled from the same quarter in 2018.

The underlying operating result before ownership costs was more than 2.3 billion Norwegian kroner (NOK), the highest ever in a second quarter and NOK 1.2 billion higher than last year.The unit revenue (RASK) increased by 13 percent, and the revenue per passenger per kilometer (yield) increased by 11 percent. For the second quarter, the total revenue was more than NOK 12 billion, an increase of 19 percent from the same period last year, primarily driven by intercontinental growth. Almost 10 million passengers flew with Norwegian this quarter, on par with the same quarter in 2018. The load factor was 88 percent, up 1.2 percentage points from last year.

Norwegian’s key priority is returning to profitability through a series of measures, including an optimized route portfolio and an extensive cost-reduction program. The production growth (ASK) in the second quarter was six percent, down from the peak growth of 48 percent in the second quarter of 2018. The company’s internal cost reduction program #Focus2019 continues with full effect and achieved cost reductions this quarter were NOK 554 million, consequently reaching the goal of NOK 1 billion so far in 2019.

“Norwegian’s Q2 results show that we are delivering on our strategy of moving from growth to profitability. Despite operational issues outside of our control, like the grounding of our 737 MAX fleet, we are delivering the highest second quarter operating revenue in the history of Norwegian. I am also pleased with the booking figures for the coming months, especially on long-haul,” said CEO of Norwegian, Bjørn Kjos.

During the second quarter, Norwegian has introduced four Boeing 787-9 Dreamliners to its fleet. With an average age of only 3.8 years, Norwegian’s fleet is one of the most fuel efficient and most modern in the world.

MAX update
In March, Norwegian temporarily suspended operation of 18 Boeing MAX 8 aircraft. The company has combined flights, booked customers to other departures within Norwegian’s own network, consequently reducing the impact on passengers. The company will continue to limit passenger disruptions by also offering flights with wetlease companies whenever necessary.

The 737 MAX grounding has affected both demand, operating expenses and production negatively. Norwegian expects the negative impact on the 2019 results to be approximately NOK 700 million.

In other news, CEO Bjorn Kjos (above) has stepped down.

The airline made this announcement:

After 17 years as the CEO of Norwegian Air Shuttle, Bjørn Kjos will leave the position and continue in a new role as an advisor to the Chairman, with effect from July 11th. Until Norwegian appoints a new CEO, CFO Geir Karlsen will act as interim CEO, while Chairman Niels Smedegaard will take on a more active role in the management.

“I am very pleased Bjørn will remain at the company as an advisor to the Board and the Chair. As Norwegian moves from growth to profitability, it will be an advantage for the company to benefit from Bjørn’s extensive network, in-depth knowledge of and experience with global aviation. We have already started the process of recruiting a permanent new CEO,” said Niels Smedegaard, Chairman of the Board of Directors at Norwegian.

“I am confident that the Board of Directors will find the best qualified successor to lead the next chapters of the Norwegian story together with the top management team. Leaving the exciting future tasks to a new CEO and taking on a new challenge as an advisor, is a set-up I am very happy with. I look forward to spending more time working on specific strategic projects that are crucial to the future success of Norwegian,” said Bjørn Kjos.

Bjørn Kjos is one of the founders of Norwegian Air Shuttle. During his tenure as CEO, the company has developed from a small domestic operation with 130 employees and four aircraft to a global and award-winning low-cost airline with more than 11,000 employees and 162 aircraft.

“Bjørn has played an unprecedented role in Norwegian’s success. His vision of offering affordable fares for all, combined with his enthusiasm and innovating spirit, has revolutionized the way people travel for pleasure and for business, not least between the continents. Bjørn is definitely one of the most influential European entrepreneurs of our time,” Smedegaard said.

Following a demanding period of financial and operational challenges, fueled by significant investments, Norwegian changed its strategy from growth to profitability in 2018. Going forward, the company will harvest from its rapid global growth and investments. Running a profitable business and boosting company value to the benefit of shareholders, customers and employees will be key for the CEO going forward.

“We have to ensure that Norwegian is well prepared and positioned to handle volatile markets and unexpected events. It is crucial that we continue to deliver on our cost reduction initiatives and that we constantly ensure that we have a route portfolio that yields profit. It is also important that the new CEO develops an organization that embraces continued improvement and operational excellence,” Smedegaard added.

Top Copyright Photo (all others by the airline): Norwegian Air Shuttle (Norwegian.com) (Norwegian Long Haul) Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner LN-LNR (msn 38784) (Freddie Mercury, British Rock Legend) LAX (Michael B. Ing). Image: 946965.

Norwegian aircraft slide show:

Norwegian delays deliveries, reports increased revenues and reduced costs in the first quarter

"Freddie Mercury, British Rock Legend"

Norwegian Air has come to an agreement with both Airbus and Boeing to reschedule the delivery of its aircraft to reduce its capital spending.

Norwegian has also reported its first quarter results. The quarter was characterised by reduced costs, increased revenue and significantly improved on-time performance. The net loss was NOK 1,489 million ($171.7 million), while the company’s unit cost excluding fuel decreased by 8 percent during the same period. The total revenue was NOK 8 billion, up 14 percent.

The airline continued;

Norwegian’s key priority is returning to profitability through a series of measures, including an extensive cost-reduction program, an optimized route portfolio and sale of aircraft. The company’s internal cost reduction program #Focus2019 has been implemented, achieved cost reductions were NOK 467 million this quarter. The company has also strengthened its balance sheet through a fully underwritten rights issue of NOK 3 billion, which secures a stronger financial position. The company is well positioned to continue to attract new customers, not least in the long-haul market, where the development is stronger than in the short-haul market.

For the first quarter, the total revenue was NOK 8 billion, an increase of 14 percent from the same period last year, primarily driven by intercontinental growth and increased traffic in the Nordics. More than 8 million passengers flew with Norwegian this quarter, a growth of 9 percent. The load factor was 81 percent. The company’s unit cost excluding fuel, decreased by 8 per cent compared to the first quarter in 2018. The punctuality increased significantly this quarter, from 73 to 81.3 percent. The regularity was unchanged at 98.7 percent.

“I’m pleased with the positive developments this quarter, despite the 737 MAX issues. We have taken a series of initiatives to improve profitability by reducing costs and increasing revenue. We are optimising our base structure and route network to streamline the operation as well as divesting aircraft, postponing aircraft deliveries and not least implementing our internal cost reduction program, which will boost our financials. I am also pleased that booking figures and overall demand for the coming months look promising,” said CEO of Norwegian, Bjørn Kjos.

Productive meetings with Boeing

In March, Norwegian temporarily suspended operation of 18 Boeing MAX 8 aircraft. The company combined flights and booked customers to other departures within Norwegian’s own network, consequently reducing the impact on passengers. The company will continue to limit passenger disruptions by also offering flights with wetlease companies whenever necessary. The number one goal is to operate its schedule according to plan.

“Our dedicated colleagues at Norwegian have been working day and night to find solutions for our customers. They will continue to do their utmost to ensure that all flights continue to depart as planned, regardless of how long the MAX stays out of service,” Kjos continued.

“We have had some productive meetings with Boeing where we have discussed how we can maneuver through the difficulties the MAX situation is causing Norwegian,” Kjos added.

Top Copyright Photo (all others by the airline): Norwegian Air Shuttle (Norwegian.com) (Norwegian Long Haul) Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner LN-LNR (msn 38784) (Freddie Mercury, British Rock Legend) AMS (Ton Jochems). Image: 946289.

Norwegian aircraft slide show: