Category Archives: Norwegian Air Shuttle

Norwegian offers customers CO2-offsetting and becomes first airline to sign UN climate action initiative

Norwegian has partnered with climate company CHOOOSE to make it easy for customers to offset their carbon footprint when buying a ticket with the airline. The initiative has been welcomed by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).

As of today, Norwegian is pleased to offer its customers climate compensation as a simple, integrated part of the booking process.

Geir Karlsen, Acting CEO of Norwegian said: “Norwegian has been named one of the world’s most environmentally friendly airlines and we are continuously working to reduce our emissions through new initiatives. We’re now putting a price on actual carbon emissions from flying, making it easy for all our customers to take climate action,”

“Even if commercial aviation technology continues to develop and Norwegian keeps reducing its environmental impact, emission-free flying is not possible today. Carbon offsetting is an important tool in managing today’s emissions, and we know that many of our customers would like to compensate for emissions associated with their journey,” he continued.

United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change: “We welcome this initiative”
Norwegian is the first airline to sign the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) pledge, committing to become climate neutral by 2050:
Putting a price on carbon in this way also helps driving more action and more ambition at all levels of society, including in business. We welcome this initiative by Norwegian to help their customers compensate their emissions when they travel. Bringing people together is fundamental for global understanding, for the economy, for wellbeing, and for the planet. We welcome Norwegian to our Climate Neutral Now initiative,” says Niclas Svenningsen, Manager, Global Climate Action, UN Climate Change.


Climate offsetting clean energy projects

Norwegian developed the feature to be as informative, simple, and trustworthy as possible. When first selecting a flight, Norwegian informs customers how its flights’ emissions compares to industry average. The CO2 emissions calculation is based on the official methodology of the United Nations’ International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO), the International Council of Clean Transportation (ICCT) and Norwegian’s own flight emissions data. Next, customers are offered a simple option to offset their calculated carbon footprint directly in the checkout process. For customers that opt in, offsetting is then performed through carefully selected CO2-reducing clean energy projects in regions Norwegian flies to. The projects are certified by the United Nations and the Gold Standard, which sets the standard for climate and development interventions to quantify, certify and maximise their impact. The Gold Standard also includes contributions to other UN Sustainable Development Goals.
In addition to climate impact, all Gold Standard projects deliver verified benefits to the local communities where they operate – new jobs, clean energy, improved air, and more. If Norwegian Air passengers are passionate about climate justice, they can trust that their contribution goes far beyond offsetting emissions,” said Sarah Leugers, Director of Communications at Gold Standard.

A seamless solution

As the partner for its new solution, Norwegian has chosen the climate-tech company CHOOOSE. Based in Oslo, Norway, CHOOOSE has developed a solution that seamlessly integrates into the customer check-out process, making it easy for customers to connect with the best CO2-reducing projects around the world. In addition to Norwegian, CHOOOSE enables a wide range of partners to integrate climate action directly into their products and services, and now has customers in over 70 countries.

“CHOOOSE collaborates with those who challenge the status quo, demonstrate that they’re committed to reducing emissions, and take responsibility for the elephant in the room – some carbon footprints cannot be entirely avoided based on today’s technology,” said Andreas Slettvoll, CEO of CHOOOSE.

CHOOOSE has achieved a lot in a short time, and together we are offering a best-in-class solution for our customers. CHOOOSE operates in an area that is developing rapidly and absolutely necessary, and represents a new, refreshing approach to climate action,” said Karlsen.

Norwegian was voted the world’s most fuel-efficient airline on transatlantic routes in 2015 and 2018 by the International Council on Clean Transportation (ICCT) and since 2008, the airline has reduced its emissions by 30 percent per passenger kilometre thanks to new, fuel-efficient aircraft.

Norwegian Air UK aircraft phot gallery:

Norwegian sells Argentinian subsidiary to JetSmart

Norwegian Air Shuttle has signed an agreement for the sale of 100 percent of its Argentinian subsidiary Norwegian Air Argentina (NAA) to JetSMART Airlines.

“We’re taking necessary steps to return to profitability,” said acting CEO Geir Karlsen.

JetSMART will assume the NAA operation with immediate effect. To minimize the impact on passengers, JetSMART will continue to operate the NAA scheduled flights from Aeroparque airport. The parties expect that the integration process will take several months, and the Norwegian brand will be phased out in the domestic Argentinian network during this period.

Over the next six months, the three Boeing 737 currently operated by NAA will be replaced by JetSMART’s Airbus A320 aircraft. The three Boeing 737s will return to service for Norwegian in Europe.

“As Norwegian moves from growth to profitability, we are taking all the necessary actions required to ensure that Norwegian is well positioned going forward. Over the past few months we have made important changes to our route network to ensure long-term profitability. Attaining satisfactory profitability for a relatively small domestic operation has proved difficult to achieve, given the overall situation in the country. While most of NAA’s costs are denominated in dollars, revenue is obtained in pesos only, and the sharp depreciation of the peso against the dollar has created a significant gap between costs and revenue,” said acting CEO and CFO of Norwegian, Geir Karlsen.

Scheduled flights to be operated as plannedAll passengers who have purchased NAA flights will fly as planned.

NAA solely operates domestic flights within Argentina so the new agreement will not affect Norwegian’s long-haul flights between London and Buenos Aires. These are operated by the British subsidiary Norwegian Air UK.

Norwegian’s employees in NAA will, as per the agreement, be employed by JetSMART except for the company’s Argentina-based call center staff. They will continue as Norwegian employees providing customer services to JetSMART’s domestic Argentina operation and to our customers on our long-haul operation between Europe and South America.

“All our colleagues in Argentina deserve a word of recognition for their dedication and hard work. The past two years have proven eventful – not only have they built a fully-fledged airline from scratch, but they have also operated it to the highest professional standards. In doing so, they have earned for Norwegian the gratitude and respect of the Argentinian people,” said CEO of Norwegian Air Argentina, Ole Christian Melhus.

NAA received its Air Operator’s Certificate in January 2018 and started operations on 16th October that year.

The company currently operates a fleet of three Boeing 737-800s, with twenty daily flights across eight routes between Buenos Aires’ Aeroparque airport to Bariloche, Córdoba, Iguazú, Jujuy, Mendoza, Neuquén, Salta, and Ushuaia.

So far, NAA has carried 982,000 passengers.

Jacob Schram appointed new CEO of Norwegian, drops long-haul routes from Stockholm and Copenhagen

Norwegian’s Board of Directors has appointed Jacob Schram as CEO of Norwegian, starting January 1, 2020. Geir Karlsen will continue as CFO and Deputy CEO.

Jacob Schram (57) has 30 years of experience from large international companies. He has previously held managing roles in Circle K, Statoil Fuel & Retail (SFR), McDonalds and McKinsey. As CEO, he led the process of publicly listing SFR on the Norwegian Stock Exchange in 2010. When Couche-Tard acquired SFR in 2012, he held the position as Group President for Europe until he stepped down in 2018. Schram initiated and led the global rebranding to Circle K at more than 10 000 stores across Couche-Tard’s international network and service stations.

Schram is also the author of the book “The Essence of business”. During the last year he has worked with private investments, start-ups and presentations related to his book and the topic “Future mobility 2030”, in addition to holding the position as Senior Advisor at McKinsey. Schram has a Master’s degree in Economics from Copenhagen Business School. He is a Norwegian citizen.

“Norwegian has made aviation history and I am honored to take on the role as CEO. The airline industry is characterized by strong competition and unforeseen events, but it is also an industry that is important to people everywhere. I look forward to using my experience to build on the strong foundation laid down by Bjørn Kjos, Geir Karlsen and the rest of the talented and dedicated Norwegian team. Now, my main focus will be to bring the company back to profitability and fortify the company’s position as a strong international player within the aviation industry,” said newly appointed CEO of Norwegian, Jacob Schram.

In other news, Norwegian’s long-haul flights from Stockholm (Arlanda) and Copenhagen will be discontinued on March 29, 2020.

Norwegian aircraft photo gallery:

Norwegian’s new route to Bergen from Manchester takes off

Norwegian’s newest route to Scandinavian took off on October 28 with a new nonstop service from Manchester to Norway.

Passengers travelling out on Norwegian’s new service to Bergen were welcomed at check-in at Manchester Airport with an inaugural celebration to mark the new route.

The new twice-weekly seasonal service on a Monday and Friday from Manchester Airport to Bergen offers consumers more choice when travelling with Norwegian to Scandinavia.

In addition to the new service, Norwegian already operates three non-stop routes to Scandinavia from Manchester Airport with three weekly flights to Oslo, two weekly flights to Stavanger and two weekly flights to Stockholm. Along with the new route the airline will now offer nine weekly flights to Scandinavia from Manchester.

Norwegian began operating from Manchester Airport in 2011 and all flights are served by new 186 seat Boeing 737-800 aircraft, offering all passengers free gate-to-gate Wi-Fi and live TV.

Flight schedule – all times local

Monday – DY1345 departs Manchester 12.15 arrives Bergen 14.55

Monday – DY1344 departs Bergan 10.50 arrives Manchester 11.30

Friday – DY1345 departs Manchester 20.50 arrives Bergen 23.30

Friday – DY1344 departs Bergan 19.30 arrives Manchester 20.10

Norwegian reports its best ever quarterly result with a profit before tax of NOK 2.2 billion

Norwegian Air Shuttle has issued this financial report:

Norwegian’s third quarter results are characterised by improved profitability, higher unit revenue, lower unit cost and reduced growth, in line with the strategy. Profit before tax improved by 38 percent to NOK 2.2 billion compared to the same quarter last year.

Unit revenue and revenue per passenger kilometer (yield) both increased by 3 percent this quarter. Total revenue was NOK 14.4 billion, an increase of 8 percent from the same period last year, primarily driven by intercontinental growth. Norwegian carried approximately 10.5 million passengers; a reduction of 3 percent due to lower capacity. The load factor was 91.2 percent, up 0.7 percentage points.

Norwegian’s key priority is returning to profitability through a series of measures, including an optimised route- and base portfolio and an extensive cost-reduction program. The production growth (ASK) in the third quarter was 3 percent, down from the peak growth of 48 percent in the second quarter of 2018. The company’s internal cost reduction program, #Focus2019, continues with full force with an achieved cost reduction this quarter of NOK 827 million. The company expects to achieve a cost-reduction of NOK 2.3 billion for the year through #Focus2019.

“Norwegian’s third quarter results show that we are delivering on our strategy of moving from growth to profitability. We are delivering record-high earnings, record-high operating revenue and reduced unit cost, even when hit by operational issues outside of our control,” said Acting CEO and CFO of Norwegian, Geir Karlsen. “I would also like to commend everyone at Norwegian for contributing to delivering on our cost-reductions,” he added.

As Norwegian’s international foothold has continued to grow, the United States is now the largest market in terms of revenue, followed by Norway, Spain and the UK.

Since 2008, Norwegian has reduced the per passenger CO2 emissions by 30 percent. During the third quarter, Norwegian’s CO2 per passenger kilometre was 69 grams – unchanged from the same period previous year, due to the use of older wet-leased aircraft caused by the grounding of the 737 Max 8 fleet. The passenger climate impact will also be reduced going forward as more new aircraft enter the fleet. With an average age of only 3.8 years, Norwegian’s fleet is one of the most fuel efficient and modern in the world.

Norwegian and JetBlue announce intent for partnership

Norwegian and JetBlue have signed a Letter of Intent (LOI) for an interline agreement.

The partnership will allow customers to combine low fares in a convenient single booking for connecting flights between Europe and the Americas. Customers will have the possibility to book connecting flights on both airlines’ websites by combining the best of the complementary and expansive networks. The partnership is planned to launch in early Summer 2020 and bookable in early 2020.

The partnership will connect more than 60 U.S. and nearly 40 Caribbean and Latin American cities to Norwegian’s network via New York-JFK, Boston and Fort Lauderdale airports. Norwegian currently offers more than 20 nonstop routes to Europe from these three airports. Customers will also be able to check in their luggage to their final destination.

Flights will be bookable during the first half of 2020 through both airlines’ websites and travel agents using the GDS booking system.

Norwegian offers close to 50 nonstop transatlantic routes from the United States and more than 550 routes overall with access to most European destinations via connections within Norwegian’s network at any time of the year.

Photo: Norwegian.

Norwegian discontinues its transAtlantic Boeing 737 MAX routes

Norwegian.com (Norwegian Air Sweden) Boeing 737-8 MAX 8 SE-RTE (msn 42838) BFI (Joe G. Walker). Image: 947301.

Norwegian has made this announcement:

Norwegian will discontinue its transAtlantic routes originally operated by the Boeing 737 MAX aircraft this September. The decision follows months of substitute aircraft and wetlease operations covering the airline’s routes due to the global grounding of the 737 MAX aircraft. There are no changes to the 46 nonstop routes operated by the Dreamliner from the United States to Europe.

“Since March, we have tirelessly sought to minimize the impact on our customers by hiring, so called wetleasing, replacement aircraft to operate services between North America and Ireland. However, as the return to service date for the 737 MAX remains uncertain, this solution is unsustainable,” said Matthew Robert Wood, Senior Vice President Commercial Long-Haul and New Markets, Norwegian.

In March, Norwegian managed to implement a back-up plan within 24 hours of the Boeing 737 MAX grounding, accommodating all customers booked on the airline’s 737 MAX routes from both New York Stewart International Airport and Providence, as well as launch the new route from Hamilton/Toronto, Canada, to Dublin.

Nonstop services to Cork and Shannon ended in March with the grounding of the 737 MAX aircraft and passengers were rerouted to Dublin flights out of both Providence and Stewart. The service to Dublin from the two U.S. cities and, also Hamilton, Canada, continued, but will now end with the last flight from the U.S. – both Providence and Stewart – on September 14, arriving in Dublin on September 15. The last flight from Hamilton, Canada, will depart September 13. Norwegian will no longer operate any substitute aircraft for the 737 MAX.

This will not affect the airline’s other long-haul services, operated by its Boeing 787 Dreamliner fleet. Norwegian currently operates 46 routes from the U.S. to Europe this summer season, more than any other European airline.

Norwegian would like to thank the partners that made it possible to launch its transatlantic MAX operations back in 2017, specifically the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, New York Stewart International Airport, Providence’s T.F. Green Airport and Tourism Ireland, as well as the John C. Munro Hamilton International Airport.

Top Copyright Photo: Norwegian.com (Norwegian Air Sweden) Boeing 737-8 MAX 8 SE-RTE (msn 42838) BFI (Joe G. Walker). Image: 947301.