Category Archives: LATAM Airlines (Chile)

LATAM Airlines Group files plan of reorganization

LATAM Airlines Group S.A. and its affiliates in BrazilChileColombiaEcuadorPeru, and the United States today announced the filing of a Plan of Reorganization, which reflects the path forward for the group to exit Chapter 11 in compliance with both U.S. and Chilean law.

The Plan is accompanied by a Restructuring Support Agreement (the “RSA”) with the Parent Ad Hoc Group, which is the largest unsecured creditor group in these Chapter 11 cases, and certain of LATAM’s shareholders. The RSA documents the agreement between LATAM, the aforementioned holders of more than 70% of parent unsecured claims and holders of approximately 48% of 2024 and 2026 U.S. Notes, and certain shareholders holding more than 50% of common equity, subject to the execution of definitive documentation by the parties and the obtaining of corporate approvals by those shareholders. As they have throughout the process, all of the companies in the group are continuing to operate as travel conditions and demand permit.

Plan Overview

The Plan proposes the infusion of $8.19 billion into the group through a mix of new equity, convertible notes, and debt, which will enable the group to exit Chapter 11 with appropriate capitalization to effectuate its business plan. Upon emergence, LATAM is expected to have total debt of approximately $7.26 billion1 and liquidity of approximately $2.67 billion. The group has determined that this is a conservative debt load and appropriate liquidity in a period of continued uncertainty for global aviation and will better position the group going forward.

Specifically, the Plan outlines that:

  • Upon confirmation of the Plan, the group intends to launch an $800 million common equity rights offering, open to all shareholders of LATAM in accordance with their preemptive rights under applicable Chilean law, and fully backstopped by the parties participating in the RSA, subject to the execution of definitive documentation and, with respect to the backstopping shareholders, receipt of corporate approvals;
  • Three distinct classes of convertible notes will be issued by LATAM, all of which will be preemptively offered to shareholders of LATAM. To the extent not subscribed by LATAM’s shareholders during the respective preemptive rights period:
    • Convertible Notes Class A will be provided to certain general unsecured creditors of LATAM parent in settlement (dación en pago) of their allowed claims under the Plan;
    • Convertible Notes Class B will be subscribed and purchased by the above referenced shareholders; and
    • Convertible Notes Class C will be provided to certain general unsecured creditors in exchange for a combination of new money to LATAM and the settlement of their claims, subject to certain limitations and holdbacks by backstopping parties.
  • The convertible notes belonging to the Convertible Classes B and C will therefore be provided, totally or partially, in consideration of a new money contribution for the aggregate amount of approximately $4.64 billion fully backstopped by the parties to the RSA, subject to receipt by the backstopping shareholders of corporate approvals;
  • LATAM will raise a $500 million new revolving credit facility and approximately $2.25 billion in total new money debt financing, consisting of either a new term loan or new bonds; and
  • The group also used and intends to use the Chapter 11 process to refinance or amend the group’s pre-petition leases, revolving credit facility, and spare engine facility.

LATAM Airlines Group and Delta Air Lines expand codeshare agreement

LATAM Airlines Group and Delta Air Lines announced the expansion of their codeshare agreements today, which will allow their customers to access more than 20 international routes between the United States and South America, along with connections to domestic and intra-continental destinations. It will also allow LATAM Airlines Group to add eight new international routes operated by Delta between South America and the U.S., and 11 domestic destinations in the U.S. from Atlanta. Delta will add 12 international routes operated by LATAM Airlines Group between South America and the U.S., connecting from Miami, Orlando, New York (JFK) and Los Angeles (LAX); as well as seven interregional routes in South America, and four new domestic destinations in Chile.

This announcement will benefit customers with more connections between both regions: more than 40 destinations in South America, including domestic routes in Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru; routes within South America, between South America and the U.S.; and more than 70 domestic routes within the U.S. Additionally, Delta Air Lines and LATAM will complement their existing codeshare network in the coming months with new routes to Delta destinations in the U.S., and between the U.S. and Canada.

The agreement between LATAM and Delta currently allows LATAM Pass® and SkyMiles® members to accumulate miles/points in their respective frequent flyer programs, including priority boarding, extra baggage check-in, and VIP lounge access for select categories. Customers will be able to easily connect between Delta and LATAM flights at airports where the airlines have relocated to the same terminal. This includes Terminal 4 at John F. Kennedy International Airport (New York), Terminal 3 at Guarulhos Airport in São Paulo and soon Terminal 2 at Arturo Merino Benitez International Airport in Santiago, Chile.

New Codeshare Routes Between LATAM Airlines Group and Delta*

Between the U.S. and South America

Cities

Operated by

Atlanta – São Paulo/Guarulhos

Delta

New York/JFK – São Paulo/Guarulhos

Delta / LATAM

Miami – São Paulo/Guarulhos 

LATAM

Orlando – São Paulo/Guarulhos

LATAM

Atlanta – Rio de Janeiro/Galeão**

Delta

Atlanta – Bogotá

Delta

Miami – Bogotá – Santiago

LATAM

New York/JFK – Bogotá

Delta

Atlanta – Lima

Delta

Los Angeles – Lima

LATAM

Miami – Lima

LATAM

New York /JFK– Lima

LATAM

Orlando – Lima

LATAM

Atlanta – Santiago

Delta

Los Ángeles – Santiago

LATAM

Miami – Santiago

LATAM

New York /JFK – Santiago

LATAM

Atlanta – Quito

Delta

Connecting U.S. Domestic Routes

Atlanta- Austin

Delta

Atlanta – Boston

Delta

Atlanta – Baltimore

Delta

Atlanta – Charlotte

Delta

Atlanta – Washington

Delta

Atlanta – Denver

Delta

Atlanta – Dallas

Delta

Atlanta – New York /JFK

Delta

Atlanta – Fort Lauderdale

Delta

Atlanta – Honolulu

Delta

Atlanta – Houston

Delta

Connecting Regional Routes in South America Operated by LATAM Airlines Group

Santiago – Bogotá

Santiago – Lima

Santiago – Montevideo 

Santiago – Rio de Janeiro

Santiago – São Paulo/Guarulhos

São Paulo/Guarulhos – Montevideo

Connecting Chile Domestic Routes Operated by LATAM Airlines Group

Santiago – Antofagasta

Santiago – Concepción 

Santiago – Puerto Montt 

Santiago – Punta Arenas 

 

*Codeshare flights are available for booking travel beginning Nov. 18.

*The Atlanta – Rio de Janeiro route will resume on Feb. 22, 2022.

LATAM reports revenue was up 47.8% in the third quarter but reported a net loss of $691.9 million

LATAM Airlines (Chile) Airbus A321-211 WL CC-BEO (msn 7298) PMC (Robbie Shaw). Image: 955835.

LATAM Group issued this statement:

Alongside the publication of its results for the third quarter of the year, the LATAM group reported that it noted a continued improvement in its revenues during the period, reaching US$1,314 million, which represents an increase of 47.8% compared to the second quarter of 2021 and 156.1% compared to the third quarter of 2020. Despite this improved performance, total revenues for the third quarter are 50.7% below 2019 as a result of the ongoing effects of the pandemic.

Cargo revenues recorded an increase of 43.6% compared to 2019, reaching US$361.4 million.

Roberto Alvo, CEO of LATAM Airlines Group, said that “our operation continues to recover, which translates to a substantial revenue improvement during the third quarter. We are already seeing the fruits of our efficiency initiatives, which will allow us to position ourselves as a highly competitive group once our Chapter 11 process is finalized.”

Regarding the operations, the LATAM group showed significant advances in the third quarter, reaching 49.7% of 2019 levels of capacity (measured in ASK), driven by a strong recovery in its domestic operations, and a capacity increase of 75% compared to the second quarter of 2021. The group expects to end the year operating more than 65% of consolidated capacity (measured in ASK) versus 2019 levels.

Total costs amounted to US$1,793 million in the period, representing a decrease of 25.2% compared to the third quarter of 2019. The group’s unit cost (cost per ASK, excluding fuel) decreased 18.3% versus the second quarter of this year, despite higher maintenance costs and a slower recovery of international operation. This result is a reflection of the efficiencies achieved by the group during the last months, which will translate into savings of more than US$900 million annually.

Operating loss in the third quarter of the year totaled US$479.2 million, while the net loss was US$691.9 million, impacted by the effects of maintenance costs, restructuring expenses and other non-recurring expenses.

Sustainability 

During the third quarter, LATAM continued to make progress in the creation of regional alliances within the context of the Solidarity Airplane program, making its connectivity, infrastructure, experience, capacity and speed available to foundations and organizations free of charge. Partnerships include Peru’s Food Bank, Operation Smile, ANIQUEM and ALINEN in Peru; SOLCA – HOPE, INDOT, Red Cross and Operation Smile in Ecuador; and Operation Smile, América Solidaria and the National Institute of Health, Panthera Colombia and the Schooner Bight Ethnic Association in Colombia, among others. It should be noted that Solidarity Airplane also has alliances in Brazil and Chile.

Since the beginning of the pandemic, the group has transported more than 160 million COVID-19 vaccines for free within Brazil, Chile, Ecuador and Peru as part of the same program.

Also, related to the climate change pillar of LATAM’s sustainability strategy, the group recently announced the CO2BIO project, an alliance that represents the first conservation project in the Orinoquia region of Colombia by the Cataruben Foundation, leveraged by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and with the participation of Panthera Colombia. CO2BIO includes the conservation of forest, wetland and grassland and the development of sustainable productive activities, and is the group’s first iconic ecosystem conservation project to contribute to the goal of carbon neutrality by 2050.

Top Copyright Photo: LATAM Airlines (Chile) Airbus A321-211 WL CC-BEO (msn 7298) PMC (Robbie Shaw). Image: 955835.

LATAM Airlines (Chile) aircraft slide show:

LATAM Airlines (Chile) aircraft photo gallery:

LATAM Group receives offers for bankruptcy reorganization exit financing

LATAM Airlines Group S.A. and certain of its debtor affiliates in Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, the United States and Peru (collectively, “LATAM”) released its five-year business plan along with advances regarding its exit financing process today. This milestone marks one of the final stages before the presentation of its plan of reorganization. LATAM forecasts recovering 2019 profitability by 2024, and a 78% operational result increase by 2026 when compared to pre-crisis.

As part of its exit financing process, LATAM has received several offers to date from its most significant claim holders and its majority shareholders, each of which provides more than US$ 5 billion of new funds, reaffirming the market’s confidence in LATAM.

LATAM Business Plan Highlights

The business plan includes a vision of the demand recovery, the fleet plan, and financial and operational projections through 2026, in addition to other information. In particular, the group forecasts a return to pre-pandemic capacity (measured in ASKs) by 2024 and a growth of 7% by 2026, compared to 2019, resulting from an estimated recovery of the domestic markets by 2022 and the international ones by 2024, in line with market consensus.

The recovery is supported by LATAM Airlines Brazil’s domestic market’s operational ramp-up to date, which reached a capacity (measured in ASKs) of 77% in August, compared to 2019, and is forecast to surpass 100% of 2019 levels in the beginning of 2022. The domestic markets of the affiliates in Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and  Chile have already reached 72% in August, while the international recovery of the group, both regional and long-haul continues to be affected by travel restrictions.

Total revenues are projected to increase 13% by 2026 with passenger revenues growing 8% and cargo revenues increasing  59% compared to 2019.

Cost reduction initiatives addressed during the Chapter 11 process, including leveraging LATAM’s digital transformation to improve efficiency, supplier renegotiations and fleet restructuring, amount to over US$900 million annually and have allowed LATAM to structurally change its cost base. Fleet costs alone note annual cash cost savings of over 40% compared to 2019. The group also expects improvements in its passenger CASK (cost per ASK) ex-fuel, which before the impact of inflation, is estimated to be 3.3 cents in 2024, with certain domestic operations even lower. Furthermore, LATAM has increased the variable portion of its cost structure from 65% in 2019 to 80% in 2021-2022, which will allow the group to better adapt to the nonlinear demand recovery path ahead.

LATAM projects an operating margin (EBIT) of 11.2% in 2026, the highest since 2010.

“Despite the dramatic crisis we have faced, we have taken full advantage of our restructuring, not only by becoming substantially more efficient, but also by cementing a better value proposition for customers, all of which has been reaffirmed by the significant interest we have received in providing exit financing” said LATAM Airlines Group SA, CEO Roberto Alvo. “We will emerge from this process as a highly competitive and sustainable group of airlines, with a very efficient cost structure, all the while maintaining the unparalleled network and connectivity that LATAM offers in all the markets it serves.”

Extension of Exclusivity Period Request

LATAM filed a motion seeking to extend the period of exclusivity to file a plan of reorganization through October 15, 2021, and to solicit acceptances of a plan through December 15, 2021.  The requested extensions will further LATAM’s development of a plan of reorganization that satisfies its exit capital and financing needs and assist in negotiations with the various stakeholders in its Chapter 11 proceedings.

Update on LATAM’s Chapter 11 Process

LATAM is currently negotiating with various stakeholders in order to agree on a plan of reorganization and exit financing to successfully emerge from Chapter 11 in compliance with all applicable laws.

Over the last few months, as part of the Chapter 11 process, LATAM has developed and made available certain material non-public information to stakeholders that are under non-disclosure agreements. Such information includes five-year projections and an initial estimate (high and low scenarios) of its total claims. This initial estimate amounts to approximately US$ 8 billion in the low scenario (US$14.2 billion including inter company claims) and US$ 9.9 billion in the high scenario (US$16 billion including inter company claims).

In accordance with the terms of these non-disclosure agreements and in furtherance of the process, LATAM has made certain disclosures today by the issuance of material facts in Chile and by the filing of Forms 6-K in the United States, which include LATAM’s financial projections, and other information regarding the Chapter 11 proceedings.

Also, in connection with these negotiations, LATAM provided an indicative proposed structure for its reorganization which sought approximately US $5 billion of equity financing and contemplated a consensual plan among stakeholders which required, among other things, the compromise by stakeholders of certain rights and compliance with both US Bankruptcy Code and Chilean law. In response to its request for proposals, LATAM has received certain non-binding exit capital/financing and restructuring proposals from its most significant claim holders and its majority shareholders. Each  proposal contemplates raising in excess of US$ 5 billion through the issuance of new debt and equity in LATAM Airlines Group S.A., which would be backstopped by the parties making the proposal. In addition, in each proposal, the proponents contemplate that if such proposal is approved and implemented, it would result in the substantial dilution of existing shares of LATAM Airlines Group S.A.

 

LATAM will continue to engage regarding the proposals with the proponents and other stakeholders, some of whom have agreed to remain under confidentiality agreements. LATAM is focused on ensuring that any exit strategy allows it to emerge with a robust capital structure, adequate liquidity, and the ability to successfully execute its business plan. Any plan will be implemented in compliance with the relevant requirements of the US Bankruptcy Code and Chilean law.

 

LATAM will keep its shareholders and the market informed regarding the progress in the Chapter 11 proceedings. Additionally, it contemplates summoning its shareholders to an extraordinary shareholders meeting when appropriate, subject to the progress of the negotiations with the various stakeholders which are currently ongoing.

LATAM projects an operation of 46% in July, the highest since the beginning of the pandemic

LATAM Group has issued this statement:

LATAM’s passenger operation for July 2021 is estimated to reach 46% (measured in available seat kilometers – ASK) compared to the same month in 2019, in a pre-pandemic context. This figure represents the largest operation projected since the beginning of the health crisis caused by SARS-CoV-2 and a significant increase from June’s operation of 36.9%. The challenge going forward, however, is the reactivation of markets like Chile and Ecuador, which register the lowest operational recovery of all of the countries in which the group operates. LATAM estimates approximately 880 domestic and international flights daily during July, connecting 116 destinations in 16 countries. Meanwhile, the Cargo division has scheduled 1,030 cargo freighter flights during the period, 20% more than in the same month of 2019. All of these projections are subject to the evolution of the pandemic, as well as travel restrictions in the countries where LATAM operates. During June 2021, passenger traffic (measured in revenue passenger-kilometers – RPK) was 32.1% compared to the same period of 2019, based on an operation measured in ASK (available seat-kilometers) of 36.9% compared to June 2019. Therefore, the load factor decreased 10.8 percentage points, reaching 72.2%. With regard to the cargo operations, the load factor was 62.8%, which corresponds to an increase of 7.7 percentage points compared to June 2019.

LATAM Group Operational Estimate – July 2021 (measured in ASK)

Brazil ● 48% projected operation (versus July 2019) ○ 75% domestic and 20% international ● Total July destinations: 44 domestic (equivalent to 418 daily flights on average) and 13 international. ○ Updates: ■ Domestic: 10 new routes: Río/Santos Dumont-Recife, Río/Santos Dumont-Maceió, Río/Santos Dumont-Natal, São Paulo/Congonhas-Fortaleza, São Paulo/Congonhas-Maceió, São Paulo/Congonhas-Natal, São Paulo/Congonhas-Recife, Fortaleza-Belém, Fortaleza-Manaus, Fortaleza-Teresina. ■ International: Restart routes São Paulo/Guarulhos-Paris and São Paulo/Guarulhos-Bogotá.

Chile ● 35% projected operation (versus July 2019) ○ 68% domestic and 21% international ● Total July destinations: 15 domestic (equivalent to 122 daily flights on average) and 14 international. ○ Updates: Restart route Santiago-New York (direct)

Colombia ● 76% projected operation (versus July 2019) ○ 98% domestic and 50% international ● Total July destinations: 15 domestic (equivalent to 136 daily flights on average) and 4 international. ○ Updates: ■ Domestic: New route Medellín-Cúcuta. ■ International: Restart route Bogotá-São Paulo/Guarulhos.

Ecuador ● 23% projected operation (versus July 2019) ○ 82% domestic and 7% international ● Total July destinations: 7 domestic (equivalent to 22 daily flights on average) and 2 international.

Peru ● 45% projected operation (versus July 2019) ○ 66% domestic and 38% international ● Total July destinations: 19 domestic (equivalent to 126 daily flights on average) and 17 international. ○ Updates: ■ Domestic: New route Arequipa-Cusco. ■ International: Restart Lima-Madrid and Lima-Orlando operations.

Cargo ● 75% projected operation (versus July 2019) ○ 63% domestic belly and 50% international belly* ○ 126% dedicated cargo * Belly: merchandise transported in the cargo hold (lower deck) of the aircraft

LATAM Group launches a pilot health passport from Lima and Santiago

The LATAM Group, through its subsidiaries in Chile and Peru, together with the International Air Transport Association (IATA) have come together to carry out the pilot of the IATA Travel Pass digital application, allowing passengers to organize and manage travel requirements complying with what is required by the authorities on international flights more efficiently and expeditiously.

IATA Travel Pass works based on the biometric information of the passenger’s passport, the results of laboratories in agreement and the joint information of the governments.

The pilot phase, which is voluntary for the passenger, is expected to take place between June 14 and July 2 on the following routes:

  • Lima-Miami
  • Lima-Santiago de Chile
  • Santiago de Chile-Lima
  • Santiago de Chile-Miami

Azul ends its codeshare agreement with LATAM, will pursue merger opportunities

"La Belle Azul" pink livery for breast cancer awareness

Azul issued this statement:

Azul, the largest airline in Brazil in terms of destinations and departures updates the market on its codeshare with LATAM and possible industry consolidation.

Azul believes that consolidation is an important part of the post-pandemic industry response and the Company is in a strong position to drive that consolidation.  The Company has hired advisors and is actively exploring industry consolidation opportunities in the region.

“The codeshare with LATAM was a unique solution in our pandemic response.  We also realized that industry consolidation would be important for the post-pandemic recovery and Azul would be a key part of any such activity.  At the end of the first quarter of 2021 we hired financial advisors and are actively exploring consolidation opportunities.  We believe the cancelation of the codeshare by LATAM is a reaction to that process,” says John Rodgerson, CEO of Azul.  “Azul is emerging from this crisis in a leadership position in terms of liquidity, network recovery and competitive advantages.  Our plans are unchanged and I am confident that we are in the best position to pursue strategic alternatives at this point in time,” says Rodgerson.

Azul will keep the market update of any developments.

Azul Route Map:

Top Copyright Photo: Azul Brasil (Azul Linhas Aereas Brasileiras) Airbus A330-941 F-WWYO (PR-ANV) (msn 1952) TLS (Eurospot). Image: 952080.

Azul aircraft slide show:

LATAM Group to expand its Boeing 767-300F freighters fleet by 2023

Delivered on November 9, 2017

LATAM Group announced the expansion of its freighter fleet growth under which it now plans to add 10 Boeing 767-300 Boeing Converted Freighters over the next three years. This will bring the fleet size to up to 21 freighters by 2023.  The first aircraft will be expected to begin operations in December 2021.

The Group’s freighter fleet growth plan initially included four firm conversion orders with Boeing and another four conversion options. Two months after the initial announcement, LATAM has exercised the four options, eight planes, and the conversion of two additional Boeing 767-300ERs. This means that the freighter fleet will be comprised of up to 21 aircraft by the end of 2023. Upon completion of the plan the Group will have almost doubled its freighter capacity as well as reduced the average fleet age from 17 to 14 years.

Growing from 11 to 21 freighter planes will enable the LATAM Group’s cargo subsidiaries to expand and reinforce their capacity to, from and within South America, and positioning the Group as the main freighter operator group in the region. The first eight airplanes have been allocated to markets that are critical for key customer segments.

“In general terms, the majority of the plan focuses on improving connectivity between North and South America. In particular, capacity from Colombia and Ecuador will be strengthened to support the flower export industry. Additional flights to support Chilean salmon exports as well as import traffic into the country will also be reinforced. Capacity to and from Brazil will also go up as we add routes from North America and Europe, boosting both the export and import markets”, said Kamal Hadad, LATAM Cargo’s Network and Alliances Director.

Hadad added that the freighter fleet flexibility will help LATAM assess a range of options. “For example, the two additional conversions could be used to refresh the current fleet or to begin new growth projects. The Group still has time to make the relevant decisions,” he concluded.

LATAM also announced that it will use some of the 767-300ERs that are awaiting conversion under a hybrid format to benefit customers in the short term. The seats will be completely removed from three planes for this purpose in order to have a payload of up to 46 tons per flight. Two of these planes are already operational. The third one is expected to be available in the second quarter of 2021.

Furthermore, LATAM is optimizing commonality across their fleet of 767-300 production and converted freighters to maximize capacity, including the ability to transport delicate goods.

Top Copyright Photo: LATAM Airlines Cargo (Chile) Boeing 767-316F ER WL N534LA (msn 32572) AMS (Ton Jochems). Image: 941889.

LATAM (Chile) aircraft slide show:

LATAM Group announces that it will be zero waste to landfill by 2027 and carbon neutral by 2050

LATAM Airlines (Chile) Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner CC-BGD (msn 35322) FRA (Marcelo F. De Biasi). Image: 939889.

LATAM Group made this announcement today:

Achieving carbon neutrality by 2050, zero waste to landfill by 2027 and protecting iconic ecosystems in South America, are some of the commitments that are part of the LATAM Group Sustainability Strategy, launched today.

“We are facing a critical moment in the history of humanity, with a serious climate crisis and a pandemic that has changed our society. Today, it is not enough to do the usual. As a group we have the responsibility to go further in the search for collective solutions. We want to be an actor that promotes the social, environmental and economic development of the region; therefore, we are assuming a commitment that seeks to contribute to the conservation of ecosystems and the well-being of the people of South America, making it a better place for all of them,” said Roberto Alvo, CEO of LATAM Airlines Group.

One of the most important announcements was the first stage of a collaboration with The Nature Conservancy (TNC), to plan conservation and reforestation actions in iconic ecosystems in the region. TNC is a global environmental organization that works based on science, creating solutions for the most urgent challenges of our planet, so that nature and people may prosper together.

“With more than 35 years of experience in Latin America, our scientific studies have shown that forest restoration and regeneration can efficiently contribute to the Nationally Determined Contributions’ (NDCs) goals. TNC believes that multisectorial collaboration accelerates the implementation of nature-based solutions to mitigate the impacts of climate change, protect biodiversity, and develop a more prosperous future for people in the region,” said Ian Thompson, Executive Director of The Nature Conservancy (TNC) Brazil.

A strategy for the next 30 years

The sustainability strategy for the next 30 years includes four pillars of work: environmental management, climate change, circular economy and shared value. The lines of action were designed collaboratively with experts and environmental organizations from across the region.

Regarding the climate change pillar, the group announced that it will work to reduce its emissions through the incorporation of sustainable fuels and new aviation technologies that are expected to be available beginning 2035. “The environment cannot wait 15 years to have the necessary technologies to reduce emissions. This is why we will work in parallel to promote these transformations and offset our emissions through nature-based solutions,” said Roberto Alvo, CEO of LATAM Airlines Group.

Through the development of a portfolio of conservation projects and other initiatives, LATAM Group will contribute to offset 50% of its domestic emissions by 2030, establishing a path to be carbon neutral by 2050. It will intervene in iconic ecosystems of South America, such as the Amazon, the Chaco, the Llanos of Orinoco, the Atlantic forest and El Cerrado, among others.

Additionally, LATAM Group will promote a program that will allow passengers, corporate and cargo customers the option of offsetting the CO2 emissions associated with their trips. In parallel, the group will offset the same amount of CO2 emissions as customers under the 1+1 program.

In circular economy, LATAM Group is committed to promoting a culture of elimination, reduction, reuse and recycling throughout the operation, in order to reach 2027 as a group that generates zero waste to landfill. To do this, single-use plastics will be eliminated before 2023 and the on-board recycling program will be expanded on all domestic routes of the LATAM Group, and all LATAM lounges will be made 100% sustainable. Similarly, the group will implement a uniform recycling program in all countries and a plan to replace materials on board with compostable, recyclable or certified items.

As part of the shared value pillar, the group will expand its capacity to transport cargo and people for health programs, natural disasters and environmental care. It should be remembered that since the beginning of the pandemic, thanks to the Solidarity Plane program, there has been the transportation of more than 29.4 million vaccines free of charge in its subsidiaries, more than 1,400 health professionals, over 490 tons of medical supplies and more than 1,500 organs and tissues in South America. At the same time, the program has confirmed 10 transports of stem cells for patients with blood cancer.

Lastly, in the case of environmental management, LATAM Group will implement a transparent and auditable system that will allow it to take into account environmental variables in all the group’s processes, which will have environmental certification (IEnvA) throughout its operation, a reference in the industry, and that is granted by the International Air Transport Association (IATA).

Top Copyright Photo: LATAM Airlines (Chile) Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner CC-BGD (msn 35322) FRA (Marcelo F. De Biasi). Image: 939889.

LATAM aircraft slide show (Chile):

LATAM to continue transporting COVID-19 vaccines at no cost within the countries where it operates throughout 2021

LATAM Cargo (Colombia) Boeing 767-316F ER WL N532LA (msn 30780) MIA (Brian McDonough). Image: 948957.

LATAM has issued this statement:

LATAM Airlines Group reported that it will continue to transport vaccines at no cost within the countries where it operates throughout 2021 through its Solidarity Plane program.

To date, the group has transported over 23.7 million vaccines against COVID-19 within South America, through more than 300 flights in the domestic markets of Brazil, Chile, Ecuador and Peru.

More than 50 towns have benefited from the doses, including those located in difficult access points including Easter Island in Chile, Galapagos in Ecuador, Iquitos in Peru. In Brazil, doses have been moved to all states, as a result of the country’s current health crisis.

After the arrival of the first shipments of vaccines to the region in December 2020, LATAM made the free transport of doses available to the authorities of the governments of the countries where it has domestic operations.

Since the beginning of the pandemic to date, Solidarity Plane has transported more than 480 tons of medical supplies, benefiting Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru. At the same time, more than 1.400 organs and tissues were mobilized within South America and the transfer of stem cells was carried out for ten people with blood cancer, who were able to receive a second chance at life. In passenger transport, more than 1.300 health professionals were able to travel to meet different needs related to Covid-19 in the countries that LATAM operates with domestic flights.

Through LATAM Cargo, the group has transported over 48 million vaccines to South America and within the countries in which it operates. LATAM Cargo is the first airline in the American continent, and the only one in the region, to obtain the CEIV Pharma (IATA) certification. This voluntary certificate internationally certifies that facilities, equipment, operations and personnel meet all applicable standards, regulations and guidelines expected by pharmaceutical manufacturers

Last week, LATAM announced plans to continue transporting vaccines at no cost within the countries where it operates throughout 2021.

Top Copyright Photo: LATAM Cargo (Colombia) Boeing 767-316F ER WL N532LA (msn 30780) MIA (Brian McDonough). Image: 948957.

LATAM Airlines aircraft slide show: