Two permanent homes are found for the last two BA Boeing 747-400s to be retired

British Airways made this announcement:

British Airways’ Queens of the Skies will continue to inspire aviation enthusiasts across the UK for years to come, after permanent homes have been found for its remaining retro-liveried Boeing 747 aircraft – the last to leave the British Airways fleet.


Picture by: Stuart Bailey

The aircraft, registrations G-BNLY and G-BYGC, are this month due to depart from British Airways’ engineering base in Cardiff, where they will be waved off by the British Airways engineers who for many years have proudly maintained the 747 fleet. The pair were among several aircraft painted in heritage liveries to mark the airline’s centenary last year.


Photo Chris Bellew /Fennell Photography Copyright 2019

Adorned in the iconic Landor livery, used between 1984 and 1997, G-BNLY has been given a new lease of life as a permanent exhibit at Dunsfold Aerodrome in Surrey. It will join its sister 747, G-CIVW, which was retired in late October and features the current Chatham Dockyard livery.

G-BYGC, painted in the BOAC ‘Gold Speedbird’ livery used between 1963 and 1974, will make the short journey from Cardiff Airport to the Bro Tathan business park in the Vale of Glamorgan. It will be maintained as a heritage piece by aviation specialists eCube Solutions to showcase the pre-eminent contribution British Airways’ 747 fleet made to UK aviation.

G-BNLY and G-BYGC are the last two British Airways 747s to be retired, with G-BYGC being the final 747 to leave the British Airways fleet. The Negus-liveried 747, registration G-CIVB, was one of the last two 747s to depart Heathrow Airport in October and has also been found a permanent home at Cotswold Airport in Gloucestershire.

British Airways announced in July it was retiring its fleet of 31 747-400 aircraft that as a result of the devasting impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the airline and the aviation sector.

British Airways aircraft photo gallery:

American to put two Boeing 737-8s back into service on non-commercial flights

American Airlines today (December 1) is planning to put two Boeing 737-8 MAX 8s (N308RD and N314RH) back into service from its Tulsa maintenance base.

N308RD is scheduled to operate flight AA 9750 from Tulsa (TUL) to the Dallas/Fort Worth (DFW) hub today, as an operational readiness flight for employees and crew training. Other flights will follow.

N314RH will also enter service today as flight AA 9785 between TUL and DFW.

Previously the airline announced the public reintroduction of the grounded type on December 29 between Miami (MIA) and New York La Guardia (LGA).

On November 18, 2020 the airline made this announcement:

Dear colleagues,

The past eight months have tested our industry and our airline. But throughout it all, our team has risen to the occasion with safety as our number one priority. From rethinking the way we support our customers to putting in place state-of-the-art cleaning procedures, you have proved time and again that no matter the challenge before us, we’ll get through it together with an unwavering focus on doing right by our customers and each other.

That focus has also guided us through the recertification of the Boeing 737 MAX. Today, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) cleared the 737 MAX to fly again following its grounding in March 2019. Throughout the 20-month recertification process, we worked closely with the FAA and Boeing, in addition to our union leaders and their safety teams, and are grateful for everyone’s diligence.

We’re particularly proud of the American team. The company, and the Allied Pilots Association (APA), APA’s Ad Hoc Return to Service Committee and the Association of Professional Flight Attendants have worked in lockstep with the mutual goal of safely returning the 737 MAX safely back to service for American. Many of our Boeing 737 pilots played an integral role in the recertification process based on their expertise. Our pilots are the best in the business, so it’s no surprise that regulators around the world, including the FAA, and Boeing relied on their experience.

If our pilots, along with the APA, FAA and our safety teams are confident the aircraft is safe, we are confident in its return to service. We’ve implemented rigorous processes to ensure that every plane in the air is safe and our pilots, flight attendants, team members and customers are confident in the return of the 737 MAX. This includes investing in extensive training and plans to fly the aircraft before it returns to commercial use. Our approximately 2,600 Boeing 737 pilots will complete the FAA-mandated and approved training, which includes computer-based training, classroom briefings and dedicated return to service training in a 737 MAX simulator.

Our aircraft will be ready thanks to the comprehensive storage program our Tech Ops team has managed. Throughout the past 20 months, the team has kept these aircraft in excellent condition with regular care and maintenance. In anticipation of the return to service, the team will complete the maintenance requirements included in the Airworthiness Directive, including updating the software. In addition to the FAA’s oversight of every 737 MAX aircraft, our FAA-licensed aviation maintenance technicians will inspect and sign off on every airplane, just as they do for every one of our other aircraft. Every aircraft will then complete an Operational Readiness flight to ensure it is ready for passenger service.

We know that restoring our customers’ confidence in this aircraft will come with time and importantly, transparency and flexibility. If a customer doesn’t want to fly on the 737 MAX, they won’t have to. Our customers will be able to easily identify whether they are traveling on one even if schedules change. If a customer prefers to not fly on this aircraft, we’ll provide flexibility to ensure they can be easily re-accommodated.

In terms of next steps, we are taking a phased approach to return the aircraft to service. We will begin with non-commercial flights in early December before the official return to service date to demonstrate that the 737 MAX is as safe as every plane we fly at American. On‌ December 29, 2020 we will resume scheduled service with two flights a day — or one round trip from MIA to LGA — through‌ Jan.‌ 4. After that, we expect to gradually phase more 737 MAX aircraft into revenue service throughout January, with up to 36 departures from our Miami hub depending on the day of the week. Ahead of our commercial flights, interested team members will also have the opportunity to fly on the 737 MAX. We’ll share more on those plans and provide additional information to support you soon.

In the meantime, thank you to everyone who has worked on the recertification efforts over this nearly two-year journey and to those who will see us through the next few weeks as we prepare for commercial service. As is always the case, safety is at the forefront of every decision we make. It’s with this unequivocal standard that we look forward to returning the 737 MAX to service.

American Airlines Boeing 737-8 MAX 8 N310RF (msn 44451) FLL (Andy Cripps). Image: 945357.

Above Copyright Photo: American Airlines Boeing 737-8 MAX 8 N310RF (msn 44451) FLL (Andy Cripps). Image: 945357.

American Airlines aircraft slide show:

AirBridgeCargo Airlines flies its first COVID-19 vaccine transportation from Beijing

AirBridgeCargo made this announcement:

A total of 6,000 doses of vaccines, weighing almost 400 kg, were safely packed into CRĒDO™ XTREME passive temperature-controlled shipping container, stacked and loaded into standard AKE container and delivered under 2-8C temperature regime. As expected, the vaccines will be part of the clinical trials the manufacturer conducts in various countries across the globe.

After months of preparations, we are actually stepping into the COVID-19 vaccine transportation phase to deliver these sophisticated pharmaceutical products the whole world relies on as a source which will help all of us to get back to normal. Thanks to the dedication and commitment of our APAC and Global Healthcare Team the first transportation went smoothly and we are ready to leverage the stable flows”.

Together with other carriers within Volga-Dnepr Group ABC, which has successfully reconfirmed its CEIV IATA certification last year, has been strengthening its capabilities in the healthcare sector and vaccine transportations, including through regular shipments of other vaccines, as well as vaccine-related shipments (equipment, vials, injections, etc) which are essential for vaccine production. The company has also aligned regular communications with all the stakeholders to exchange experience and best practice, learn from peers and guarantee safe and efficient transportation of vaccines across the globe.

AirBridgeCargo aircraft photo gallery:

Chile becomes the first Latin American country to trial digital health pass for American Airlines

American Airlines has made this announcement:

American Airlines and the government of Chile are partnering to offer customers access to VeriFLY, a new mobile app designed to help travelers understand coronavirus (COVID-19) documentation requirements and enable them to securely store and display their test results digitally. In addition, the airline is the first to provide customers traveling to South America with a convenient at-home testing option through LetsGetChecked. Travelers to the U.S. Virgin Islands will also be able to take advantage of the at-home testing option in December.

Since American announced its preflight COVID-19 testing program in October, the airline has continued to expand customer access to its at-home testing partner, LetsGetChecked, now available for all of the carrier’s flights to Belize, Grenada, St. Lucia and the Hawaiian Islands.

“As we continue to reopen travel throughout Latin America and the Caribbean, we have been looking for ways to simplify our customers’ travel experience. Our preflight testing program and our recently launched mobile app trial are essential tools that will help our customers return to the skies,” said Juan Carlos Liscano, Vice President of Operations for Miami, the Caribbean and Latin America. “American is the leading U.S. airline in the region and we are committed to helping restart travel and tourism in the countries we serve.”

Mobile app trial expansion

American recently announced a partnership with a new mobile wellness wallet solution, VeriFLY, from the identity assurance leader Daon. The app is designed to help travelers easily understand COVID-19 requirements for their destination and streamline airport check-in through digital verification to ensure customers have completed those requirements.

Beginning Dec. 7, customers traveling between Miami International Airport (MIA) and Santiago, Chile (SCL) will have the opportunity to test the new solution at no cost by creating a secure profile and confirming details for their trip. The app can be utilized on both ends of the travel journey for seamless verification. The app was initially available for customers traveling to Jamaica.

LetsGetChecked available for Chile and US Virgin Islands

American is also expanding its partnership with LetsGetChecked to give more customers access to at-home PCR testing with observation by a medical professional via virtual visit.

Customers traveling to Chile will have access to preflight COVID-19 testing on flights beginning Dec. 7. Testing must be complete within 72 hours of departure.

For travel beginning Dec. 9, customers traveling from the U.S. to the U.S. Virgin Islands will have access to the testing program on the following flights. Testing must be complete within five days of departure.

  • Flights to Cyril E. King Airport (STT) in St. Thomas from American’s hubs in Charlotte (CLT), Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW), Miami (MIA), Chicago (ORD) and Philadelphia (PHL).
  • Flights to Henry E. Rohlsen Airport (STX) in St. Croix from CLT and MIA.

American Airlines in Chile

American resumed passenger flights to Chile Aug. 5 and is currently operating daily service between MIA and SCL. To keep commerce and essential goods moving during the pandemic, the carrier operated cargo-only flights between MIA and SCL from June through October and continues to transport cargo on its passenger flights. To date, the airline has moved more than 1.7 million kilos of cargo to Chile, including pharmaceuticals and critical medical supplies.

American Airlines in US Virgin Islands

During the pandemic, American has continued operating service to the U.S. Virgin Islands – both St. Thomas (STT) and St. Croix (STX) – and is currently flying more than 50 weekly flights to STT from its hubs in CLT, DFW, MIA, ORD and PHL, as well as more than 20 weekly flights to STX from CLT and MIA.

Hageland Aviation Services is acquired, Rambler Air is launched

Ascent Global Logistics (the owner of USA Jet Airlines) has announced the acquisition of Alaska-based Hageland Aviation Services, LLC (Ravn Connect) and the launch of Rambler Air, LLC, a new air service provider focused on safe, reliable travel within Alaska. Rambler will serve commuter flights as well as passenger and cargo charters. Service is expected to launch in early 2021 with eight Piper Chieftain Navajos and two Beechcraft 1900Ds. Rambler Air will be headquartered in Anchorage at Lake Hood.

“Rambler Air will provide a much-needed service to Alaskan communities and businesses,” said Tom Stenglein, President and CEO of Ascent Global Logistics. “We enter Alaska with more than four decades of running USA Jet, a 121 and 135 certified airline, in the lower 48 states. We look forward to bringing our track record of safety, operational excellence and reliable service to Alaska.”

Rambler Air is an expansion of Ascent’s Arctic On-Demand service launched earlier this year. Arctic On-Demand is an Alaska-focused air charter brokerage for both cargo and passengers. Covering even the most remote Alaskan locations, Arctic On-Demand delivers pricing visibility across a network of asset-based air cargo and passenger carriers.

Alaska’s economy relies on air services more than any state in the lower 48, making it perfect for Ascent’s proprietary air charter bid-board technology, which powers Arctic On-Demand,” said Chris Jamroz, Executive Chairman of Ascent. “Now supported by our launch of Rambler Air and our acquisition of Hageland Aviation, Ascent will have one of the most comprehensive and customer-focused air offerings in Alaska. This is the first acquisition for Ascent as a stand-alone company, and we hope to make many more like this.”

“With the impact of COVID-19, potential capacity in Alaska air service is down 45 percent. Rambler Air will be a critical part of the solution in meeting future demand of the Alaskan market,” said Rebecca Clark, Managing Director for Arctic On-Demand.

“We are planning on creating up to 45 professional aviation jobs in Alaska,” said newly-appointed Director of Operations of Rambler Air, Luke Hickerson. “We have assembled a team of Alaska’s best in aviation with a passion for serving the unique transportation needs of our state. This is a market we are investing in for the long haul.”

Preparing for a Vaccine: American cargo operations conducting trial flights from Miami to South America

American Airlines made this announcement:

The American Airlines Cargo team is preparing for its critical role in transporting the coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccine once approved. In mid-November, American’s cargo operation began conducting trial flights, in conjunction with pharmaceutical and cargo partners, from Miami to South America on its Boeing 777-200 aircraft. The trial flights stimulate the conditions required for the COVID-19 vaccine to stress test the thermal packaging and operational handling process that will ultimately ensure it remains stable as it moves across the globe.

While the situation will be unique, the task is not new to American — the airline’s cargo operation has been shipping life-saving medicine for more than eight decades. Since the beginning of the pandemic, American has been transporting hundreds of thousands of pounds of personal protective equipment (PPE), medical equipment, COVID-19 test kits and pharmaceuticals to help battle the coronavirus. As a recognized expert in cold chain logistics, American has been involved in transporting components for Phase III COVID-19 vaccine trials, including quickly and safely carrying test vaccines and specimens to research facilities around the world.

“A COVID vaccine is essential for everyone’s health and well-being and for our nation’s recovery.” said American Airlines Cargo President Jessica Tyler. “The American Airlines team is working collaboratively with cargo, pharmaceutical and federal partners so we are ready to safely and quickly transport an approved vaccine. Despite the significant challenges the airline industry is facing, we’re working night and day to put our greatest strengths to use during this time of need — our network, our aircraft and our incredible team.”

Many vaccines, including the COVID-19 vaccine, need special handling to keep a consistently cold temperature throughout their journey. American has an established network of facilities and team members who specialize in temperature-critical shipments and are familiar with handling the variety of requirements that different pharmaceuticals may need.

This level of expert care has earned American the International Air Transport Association’s prestigious Center of Excellence for Independent Validators in Pharmaceutical Logistics (CEIV Pharma) certification. The CEIV certification is given to air carriers and players in the air cargo supply chain that have established the tools, procedures and staffing to ensure life sciences products are properly handled and arrive at their destination with full efficacy.

Vaccine shipments can be sent in “active containers” with built-in temperature controls that regulate and monitor shipments during transport, or “passive containers” that are cooled with cold packs or dry ice in an enclosed system designed to keep the product cold for the life of its journey.

American’s global network of temperature-controlled facilities provide a variety of climate types for short-term pharmaceutical storage and expert handling while the vaccines are in the airline’s care. From the time a shipment arrives at the airline’s facility, it is tracked throughout its journey on the ground and from American’s Cargo Control Center, located within the airline’s Integrated Operations Control in Fort Worth.

In 2019, Cargo operations began an overhaul of IT infrastructure to ensure better tracking and management of shipments and enable enhanced proactive monitoring capabilities to troubleshoot for potential issues before they occur. Between these technology enhancements and American’s experts on the ground, all cargo shipped on American flights, including sensitive life sciences products, is closely tracked.

The preparations taking place are part of American’s ongoing commitment to its customers to do all it can to keep the world’s goods moving in a difficult year. The commercial aviation industry, like many, has been hit hard by the pandemic. According to Airlines for America, airline passenger volumes are down 50% and U.S. carriers have one-third of their fleet idled due to weak demand. In response, the airline launched cargo-only flying in March to help continue to move food, medical supplies and other essential goods.

Photo Below: A Boeing 777-200 aircraft with containers ready to be loaded in the cargo compartment at Miami International Airport. American’s cargo operation has recently used this type of aircraft and cargo containers for its trial flights from Miami to South America in preparation for transporting the COVID-19 vaccine once approved.

A Boeing 777-200 aircraft with containers ready to be loaded in the cargo compartment at Miami International Airport. American’s cargo operation has recently used this type of aircraft and cargo containers for its trial flights from Miami to South America in preparation for transporting the COVID-19 vaccine once approved.

A Boeing 777-200 aircraft with containers ready to be loaded in the cargo compartment at Miami International Airport. American’s cargo operation has recently used this type of aircraft and cargo containers for its trial flights from Miami to South America in preparation for transporting the COVID-19 vaccine once approved.

QANTAS to outsource around 2,000 ground handling jobs at 10 airports

QANTAS Airways has made this announcement:

QANTAS has notified around 2,000 employees that it will move to outsource ground handling operations at 10 airports across Australia as it works to recover from the COVID crisis.

In August, the airline announced its reasons for needing to restructure its ground handling operations, which includes baggage handling and aircraft cleaning, and commenced a review of external bids from specialist ground handlers and in-house bids from employees and their representatives.

The bids were required to meet the following objectives:

  • Reducing the overall cost of ground handling operations (as QANTAS anticipated it could save approximately $100 million annually, based on pre-COVID levels of flying, through the use of third-party providers)
  • Avoiding large spending on ground handling equipment such as aircraft tugs and baggage loaders ($80 million over five years)
  • Better matching our ground handling services, and their cost, with fluctuating levels of demand.

The Transport Workers Union (TWU) submitted a bid on behalf of employees in accordance with terms in the enterprise agreement. Teams from some individual airports submitted local proposals. Unfortunately, none of these bids met the objectives.

QANTAS granted three separate extensions to the original deadline for the bid following requests by the TWU, doubling the total period to 12 weeks.

Their resulting national bid was, by their own admission, ‘theoretical’ with no roadmap of how projected cost savings would be achieved. For instance, the proposal resulted in 1 million surplus labour hours – or around 900 roles – but no details on how to deal with that surplus.  It also did not meet the objectives relating to capital expenditure on ground services equipment nor matching the ground handling services (and their cost) to fluctuating levels of demand.

While proposals from employees at various ports did include detailed plans that would save around $18 million, there remained a significant gap compared to what was offered by third party providers.

A number of external bidders, some of whom already provide these services at 55 airports across Australia, were able to meet all of the objectives, including reducing annual costs by approximately $103 million. The preferred bidders are being notified today and, subject to consultation and finalising contract terms, transition is intended to occur in the first quarter of 2021.

As required under its enterprise agreement, QANTAS will now consult with its ground handling employees and their representatives on the next steps. Affected employees will be entitled to a redundancy package and given support to transition to new jobs outside the business. It’s expected that there will be a range of opportunities for some impacted team members with suppliers in the sector as travel demand gradually recovers.

Jetstar has already transitioned its ground handling operations at six airports to external suppliers – a decision that was announced at the same time QANTAS announced its review process.

In August, we also announced a separate proposal to outsource crew bus services in-and-around Sydney Airport, potentially affecting around 50 employees. This review process is ongoing with a decision expected before the end of the year.

This announcement follows a $2.7 billion statutory loss for the Group in FY20 due to COVID-19 and associated border restrictions. Further significant losses are projected in FY21 due to a drop of revenue in excess of $10 billion. Since the beginning of the pandemic, the QANTAS Group has taken on in excess of $1.5 billion in additional debt.

This announcement unfortunately brings job losses across the Group as a result of the COVID crisis and associated border closures to around 8,500 of its 29,000 pre-COVID workforce.

Comments from Qantas Domestic and International CEO Andrew David:

“This is another tough day for QANTAS, particularly for our ground handling teams and their families. We thank every one of them for their professionalism and contribution over the years supporting our customers and operations.

“Unfortunately, COVID has turned aviation upside down. Airlines around the world are having to make dramatic decisions in order to survive and the damage will take years to repair.

“While there has been some good news recently with domestic borders, international travel isn’t expected to return to pre-COVID levels until at least 2024. We have a massive job ahead of us to repay debt and we know our competitors are aggressively cutting costs to emerge leaner.

“The TWU’s in-house bid claimed that significant savings could be made but it failed to outline sufficient practical detail on how this might be achieved, despite us requesting this information multiple times throughout the process. Even with the involvement of a large accounting firm, the bid falls well short of what the specialist external providers were able to come up with.

“We have used these specialist ground handlers at many Australian airports for decades and they’ve proven they can deliver a safe and reliable service more efficiently than it’s currently done in-house. This isn’t a reflection on our people but it is a reflection of economies of scale and the urgent need we have because of COVID to unlock these efficiencies.”

 

QANTAS RESPONSE TO THE TRANSPORT WORKERS UNION’S CLAIMS

 

UNION CLAIM – These specialist ground handlers are unsafe.

FACT – This is not true and ignores the fact they have been safely supporting Qantas’ operations (as well as other airlines) at airports around the country, in some cases for decades. Outsourced ground handlers are required to abide by Qantas Group policies and procedures. The data shows that external ground handlers are no less safe and in some cases their safety performance is better. Take aircraft loading, which is a core part of what ground handlers do. An average of 0.4 aircraft damage events per 1000 flights for outsourced operations compared with 0.8 for Qantas staffed airports.

UNION CLAIM – The in-house bid process is a sham process.

FACT – The TWU requested that this process be added to the enterprise bargaining agreement back in 2012 and it has been approved by the union and employees in two subsequent agreements. At the request of the TWU, the deadline for the bid was extended on three separate occasions, allowing a total period of over 12 weeks.

Over the past three months we have provided the TWU with access to extensive data, met with them on nine occasions and thoroughly considered and costed their proposals. 23 employees were released on full pay to prepare the in-house bid.

Extracts from 2012 Workplace Determination:

[68] The TWU seeks the insertion of what is described as “the ACTU Protocol” – a revised version of a protocol dealing with contracting out and outsourcing developed first in 1996.


[69] The TWU contends that the key feature of the clause is the requirement to provide an opportunity for employees to prepare an in-house bid to demonstrate that savings can be generated without outsourcing.

UNION CLAIM – This is really about lowering workers’ wages and conditions.

FACT – This is not true. This has never been about employee terms and conditions – it is about overall efficiencies. Specialist ground handlers charge on a ‘per aircraft turn’ basis, which costs us around 40 per cent less than doing the work in house. This is due to their economies of scale and the fact that they can spread overheads and equipment costs over the many airlines they serve.

UNION CLAIM – QANTAS has violated the intent of the JobKeeper scheme, and abused taxpayers money. They should pay it back.

FACT – The lion’s share of Government support we’ve received has been through JobKeeper, which has been a lifeline for our employees who were stood down. We have fully complied with the spirit and purpose of JobKeeper – including recognising when jobs aren’t coming back and making those jobs redundant.

The rest of the government support was used to maintain critical domestic and international air services – which in turn generated paid work for our people.

The TWU’s demand that QANTAS pay back government support such as JobKeeper would require us to claw it back from their members – which makes no sense.

In June, while the majority of our employees were receiving JobKeeper, Prime Minister Scott Morrison said it was obvious that jobs would have to go: “These jobs have been lost because of the coronavirus. This is the COVID-19 recession. And for a business like QANTAS, that is about flying planes around the world, when you can’t do that, that has an obvious impact.”

QANTAS Airways aircraft photo gallery:

QANTAS to recommence direct flights from Melbourne to the Sunshine Coast

QANTAS Airways has made this announcement:

QANTAS will recommence direct flights from Melbourne to the Sunshine Coast following the announcement of the border opening between Queensland and Victoria.

From December 17, 2020, the flying kangaroo will operate a daily service with passengers arriving on the Sunshine Coast at lunchtime.

The seasonal service will run to January 31, 2021 and will be the first time in three years that Qantas has flown on the route. The flights will be operated by a two-class Boeing 717 aircraft, offering more than 1500 seats each week. The airline will look to extend the service if there is strong demand.

Photo: QANTAS Link.

QANTAS will also restart flights from Sydney to Maroochydore on December 1, 2020 with five services a week, increasing to daily flights from December 18, 2020. Jetstar will also recommence services to Maroochydore operating up 44 flights a week from Sydney, Melbourne and Adelaide.

QANTAS also last week launched a new route between Sunshine Coast and Canberra, operating three times per week – the first time QANTAS landed in the Sunshine Coast since March.

The Aviation Recovery Fund has so far supported 18 services to get back into the air to generate more than $66.1 million in overnight visitor spending for regional Queensland economies and support 536 jobs.

 

Condor adds back the Dominican Republic and the Maldives

Condor Flugdienst has made this announcement:

Germany’s most popular leisure airline is once again flying to the Dominican Republic and the Maldives: From December 18, 2020, Condor will take off from Frankfurt three times a week to Punta Cana and once a week to Puerto Plata, Santo Domingo.

The Maldives will also be included in the program again with two weekly flights from Frankfurt. The connections to the Canary Islands will be increased: From Frankfurt, Düsseldorf, Hamburg and Munich, Condor will take vacationers to Lanzarote, Fuerteventura, Gran Canaria, La Palma, Tenerife and Madeira.

Protective measures during the flight

On board all Condor flights, mouth-nose protection is mandatory for guests and the cabin crew. In addition, service and also boarding and disembarkation processes are adapted in accordance with the regulations. Customers are requested to use the online check-in. This ensures maximum protection during the entire journey. On site, guests are asked to behave prudently and in accordance with hygiene regulations throughout their stay and to take into account the entry requirements of the respective destination and the regulations on their return to Germany.

Connections from Frankfurt, from December 18, 2020

Varadero: Tuesday, Friday, Saturday

Punta Cana: Monday, Wednesday, Saturday

Santo Domingo: Sunday

Maledives: Monday, Saturday

Condor aircraft photo gallery:

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Air Canada provides update on cargo business, will convert 767-300ERs to freighters

Air Canada is pleased to announce the appointment of Jason Berry as Vice President, Cargo effective January 1, 2021.  Mr. Berry will be based at Air Canada’s Montreal headquarters, and will report directly to Lucie Guillemette, Executive Vice President and Chief Commercial Officer.

Air Canada today also provided an update on its cargo business and the next steps in its strategic plan as the airline continues to adapt rapidly to evolving market opportunities. To date, Air Canada has operated more than 3,500 all-cargo flights globally, and the airline is now finalizing plans to convert several of its owned Boeing 767-300ER aircraft to freighters to fully participate in global cargo commercial opportunities.

The carrier has successfully concluded collective agreement amendment with its pilots represented by the Air Canada Pilots Association (ACPA), for contractual changes to enable Air Canada to competitively operate dedicated cargo aircraft in the cargo marketplace, which have now been ratified by the Air Canada pilots.

Mr. Berry comes to Air Canada from Alaska Airlines’ wholly owned subsidiary McGee Air Services, where he was President with oversight for all aspects of aviation services ground handling, aircraft grooming, airport mobility services, check-in and gate services. From 2012 until June 2019, he led Alaska Airlines’ cargo business, with direct responsibility for all aspects of cargo operations and compliance including revenue growth.  Prior to joining Alaska Airlines, he held operational positions with increasing responsibility at other air cargo handlers and operators.

Mr. Berry holds a Master of Business Administration from the University of Washington’s Michael G. Foster Schoolof Business, in addition to earning a Bachelor’s degree in Computer/Information Technology Administration and Management from Central Washington University, and an Associate’s degree in Business and Commerce from South Seattle College.