Category Archives: Boeing

Photo of the Day: The cockpit of the Boeing 737-8 MAX 8

Photo: Boeing. The front office of the new MAX 8. The 737 MAX flight deck features four large displays, which give crews increased situational awareness.

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Boeing statement on WTO ruling

Boeing issued this statement:

The World Trade Organization (WTO) today in its final decision found that the European Union (EU) has failed to honor multiple previous rulings and has provided more than $22 billion of illegal subsidies to European aircraft maker Airbus. After examining this case for more than a decade, the WTO has determined the EU must end its unfair business practices and remedy the ongoing harm caused by the illegal subsidies.

This landmark ruling by the WTO Appellate Body is the final decision in this case, which was initiated in 2006. Today’s decision ends the dispute and clears the way for the United States Trade Representative (USTR) to seek remedies in the form of tariffs against European imports to the United States.

The authorized tariffs are likely to total billions in duties per year, unless and until Airbus addresses the illegal subsidies it received from European governments for its most recently launched airplanes. It is anticipated that U.S. tariffs will be authorized up to the amount of annual harm this market-distorting tactic is causing. Tariffs could be scheduled as early as 2019. This is expected to be the largest-ever WTO authorization of retaliatory tariffs.

“Today’s final ruling sends a clear message: disregard for the rules and illegal subsidies is not tolerated. The commercial success of products and services should be driven by their merits and not by market-distorting actions,” said Dennis Muilenburg, Boeing chairman, president and CEO. “Now that the WTO has issued its final ruling, it is incumbent upon all parties to fully comply as such actions will ultimately produce the best outcomes for our customers and the mutual health of our industry. We appreciate the tireless efforts of the U.S. Trade Representative over the 14 years of this investigation to strengthen the global aerospace industry by ending illegal subsidies.”

The U.S. government, with Boeing’s full support, has complied with WTO rulings stemming from the two cases the EU brought against the United States. One case has already ended in favor of the United States, and in the other, the vast majority of the allegations the EU made against the United States and Boeing were dismissed. Where there were narrow rulings against U.S. practices, they have been fully addressed to the WTO’s satisfaction.

Just one finding against the United States now remains before the WTO, which concerns a Washington state tax measure. It is under appeal and should be decided later this year or in early 2019. Boeing believes that ruling will be reversed, but if not, Boeing has pledged to do whatever necessary to come into full compliance in the interest of upholding rules-based trade, which is essential to fairness and the future prosperity of the global aerospace industry.

The first commercial aircraft to fly using 100% biofuel

Boeing-FedEx "ecoDemonstrator Program"

Boeing made this announcement on social media:

This FedEx Express Boeing 777F Freighter is the first commercial aircraft to fly using 100% biofuel. The “sky’s the limit” for our ecoDemonstrator Program to deliver new technologies to meet environmental goals.

Boeing previously announced the innovative program in November 2017 for the 777F:

To most, it looked like a normal delivery to FedEx Express recently when Boeing Commercial Airplanes handed over the keys to a 777 Freighter. Yet, the special decals attached to the fuselage indicated it will be the next ecoDemonstrator, the fifth iteration of the flight test program.

It will be the first time a 777 is used for the ecoDemonstrator flying testbed, having used a 737, 787, 757 and Embraer airplane in previous years. To date, the ecoDemonstrator program has tested more than 80 technologies using four airplanes as flying test beds.

In 2018, Boeing and FedEx plan to work together to test more than 35 technologies aboard the FedEx-owned 777 Freighter, including flight deck enhancements, compact thrust reverser and advanced materials.

Before testing innovations that could enhance flight safety and efficiency, the airplane will first go into revenue service in the FedEx fleet through the end of the year, flying international routes. The freighter will be returned to Boeing in January, when it will serve as the ecoDemonstrator testbed through May.

“Boeing’s ecoDemonstrator program plays an important role in the company’s innovation and environmental strategy,” said Mike Sinnett, Commercial Airplanes vice president of Product Strategy and Future Airplane Development. “By using flight testing to accelerate new technologies, we can move development along, off the critical path.”

Some of the technology, with the goal of reducing emissions and noise, also can improve airlines’ gate-to-gate efficiency and other operational goals. Proven ecoDemonstrator technologies and processes might be incorporated into existing production models, made available for in-service fleets or applied to new airplane development programs.

After testing is completed, the airplane will be returned to FedEx in original condition so the carrier can return the airplane to service in its fleet.

By Bret Jensen

Top Copyright Photo (all others by Boeing): FedEx Express Boeing 777F N878FD (msn 40684) (ecoDemonstrator Program) PAE (Nick Dean). Image: 939725.

Bottom Copyright Photo: FedEx Express Boeing 777F N878FD (msn 40684) (ecoDemonstrator Program) BFI (Joe G. Walker). Image: 941665.

FedEx Express Boeing 777F N878FD (msn 40684) (ecoDemonstrator Program) BFI (Joe G. Walker). Image: 941665.

Boeing dismantles an unwanted 787 Dreamliner

Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner N787FT (msn 40694) BFI (Joe G. Walker). Image: 941660.

Boeing is dismantling this former 787 test aircraft, line number 5, part of the early overweight group known as the “Terrible Teens”, at Paine Field in Everett, WA.

Number five, the pictured N787FT (msn 40694), built in 2009, is in the process of being broken up by a contractor. The aircraft had sat at PAE for years in a derelict condition after the type received its FAA type certification.

The airframe was just too heavy to have any chance of being resold.

Most of the “Terrible Teens”, as they were known, eventually found buyers, albeit at a discounted price.

According to the Seattle Times, the dismantling is being used as a teaching method on how to recycle aircraft and aircraft parts made of carbon fiber. A contractor is disassembling the prototype airframe.

Attached are photos of this airplane seen at Boeing Field (BFI) in 2011, when it was doing flight tests for the certification.

Read the full article: CLICK HERE

Top Copyright Photos: Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner N787FT (msn 40694) BFI (Joe G. Walker). Image: 941660.

Boeing delivers the first 737-800BCF to GECAS and West Atlantic

Boeing on April 19 announced the delivery of the first 737-800 Boeing Converted Freighter (BCF). The first customer is GE Capital Aviation Services (GECAS) and the freighter will be operated by West Atlantic Group, based in Sweden.

West Atlantic will receive four 737-800 aircraft within the next 11 months and, once delivered, the company will operate 23 Boeing 737 freighter aircraft.

Boeing’s Current Market Outlook forecasts that over the next 20 years, customers will need more than 1,100 standard-body converted freighters.

Through its freighter conversion program, Boeing transitions passenger airplanes into freighters, extending the service life of the airplane. The 737-800BCF carries more payload – up to 23.9 tonnes (52,800 lbs) – and has longer range – 2,000 nautical miles (3,750 km) than other standard-body freighters – providing capability to open new markets. The 737-800BCF freighter also offers operators newer technology, lower fuel consumption and better reliability than other standard-body freighters. It primarily will be used to carry express cargo on domestic / short haul routes.

For the 737-800BCF, Boeing has received 45 orders and commitments, from seven customers including: YTO Airlines, based in Hangzhou, China; China Postal Airlines, based in Beijing, China; GECAS, based in Ireland; Air Algerie, based in Algiers, Algeria; LAS Cargo, based in Bogota, Colombia; Cargo Air, based in Sophia, Bulgaria ; and an unannounced customer.

Twelve pallet positions provide 4,993 cubic feet (141.4 cubic meters) of cargo space on the main deck of the 737-800BCF. This will be supplemented by two lower-lobe compartments, combined providing more than 1,540 cubic feet (43.7 cubic meters) of space for revenue-generating cargo.

Existing passenger airplanes will be modified at select facilities located near conversion demand, including Boeing Shanghai Aviation Services Co. Ltd., and Taikoo (Shandong) Aircraft Engineering Co. Ltd., also known as STAECO, in China. Modifications include installing a large main-deck cargo door, a cargo-handling system and accommodations for up to four non-flying crew members or passengers.

Photo: Boeing.

Rolls-Royce provides an update on the Trent 1000 Package C engine issues

Rolls-Royce provided this update on the engine issues:

At our 2017 Full Year results on 7 March 2018 we outlined our management of certain Trent 1000 engine in-service issues and the estimated costs relating to our implementation of the solutions to address those issues.

As part of our ongoing inspection and testing of those engines we have decided to carry out additional engine inspections to those previously planned. The increased inspection frequency is driven by our further understanding of the durability of the Trent 1000 Package C compressor, a condition that we highlighted earlier this year. These inspections will be supported by service management and flight operations guidance to airlines to be issued by the airworthiness authorities.

This will unfortunately lead to additional disruption for our customers. There are 380 Package C engines currently in-service with airlines. This new regime does not impact Trent 1000 Package B engines or Trent 1000 TEN engines.

While the compressor technical issue was known at the time of our results, the requirement for more regular inspections will lead to higher than previously guided cash costs being incurred during 2018. We are reprioritising various items of discretionary spend to mitigate these incremental cash costs and our guidance for 2018 FCF remains unchanged at Group FCF for 2018 of around £450m +/- £100m.

Warren East, CEO, Rolls-Royce, said: “Our focus is on supporting our customers and doing all we can to minimise any impact on their operations. We sincerely regret the disruption this will cause to our customers and our team of technical experts and service engineers is working around the clock to ensure we return them to full service as soon as possible. We will be working closely with Boeing and affected airlines to minimise disruption wherever possible.”

Copyright Photo: Robbie Shaw. One of LATAM Airlines’ (Chile) Boeing 787-8 is in storage at Victorville due to the engine problems.

As a result, Boeing issued this follow-up statement:

We are aware that Rolls-Royce made a financial disclosure today in connection with increased inspections of the Trent 1000 Package C engine.

About 25 percent of the 787 Dreamliner fleet is powered by this Rolls-Royce engine variant. This issue does not affect current production 787s, the Trent 1000 Package B, Trent 1000 TEN or GEnx-1B engines.

An existing EASA Airworthiness Directive for the Package C engine requires inspections of an intermediate pressure compressor blade at certain flight cycles. If a durability issue is found, the blade will be replaced. This is a known issue and we will continue to work with Rolls-Royce, our customers and the regulators to fully resolve it. Boeing is deploying support teams to mitigate service disruption.

Safety is our highest priority. The 787 has safely flown more than 3.2 billion miles since entering commercial service in 2011.