Tag Archives: Boeing 737-8 MAX 8

Air Canada cancels 11 orders for the Boeing 737 MAX

Air Canada has cancelled order for 11 additional Boeing 737-8 MAX 8 aircraft due to the on-going troubles with the type.

It still has 26 on order and 24 grounded.

Air Canada aircraft photo gallery:

Turkish Airlines agrees to a MAX compensation deal with Boeing

Delivered on November 5, 2018

Turkish Airlines has agreed to a compensation deal with Boeing over the grounding and delay concerning the Boeing 737 MAX according to Reuters.

Read the full report.

Top Copyright Photo: Turkish Airlines Boeing 737-8 MAX 8 TC-LCC (msn 60034) IST (TMK Photography). Image: 944512.

Turkish Airlines aircraft slide show:

 

 

Southwest extends the Boeing 737 MAX grounding to April 13, 2020

Southwest Airlines made this announcement:

Southwest Airlines continues to monitor information from Boeing and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) on the impending 737 MAX software enhancements and training requirements. We remain confident that, once certified by the FAA, the enhancements will support the safe operation of the MAX.

We previously removed the MAX through March 6, 2020 to offer reliability to our operation and stability for our Customers. Based on continued uncertainty around the timing of MAX return to service, the Company is proactively removing the MAX from its flight schedule through April 13, 2020.

By proactively removing the MAX from scheduled service, we can reduce last-minute flight cancellations and unexpected disruptions to our Customers’ travel plans. The limited number of Customers who have already booked their travel and will be affected by our amended schedule will be notified of their re-accommodated travel according to our flexible accommodation procedures. The revision will proactively remove roughly 300 weekday flights from our schedule out of our total peak-day schedule of more than 4,000 daily flights.

We offer our apologies to our Customers impacted by this change, and we thank them for their continued patience.

American extends the grounding of the Boeing 737-8 MAX 8 fleet

American Airlines has once again provided updated guidance on when the company expects to get the Boeing 737-8 MAX 8 fleet back in the air:

American Airlines remains in continuous contact with the Federal Aviation Administration, Department of Transportation and Boeing. Based on the latest guidance, American anticipates that the resumption of scheduled commercial service on American’s fleet of Boeing 737 MAX aircraft will occur April 7, 2020. Once the aircraft is certified, American will run flights for American team members and invited guests only prior to April 7.

Frequently asked questions

Question: When will American run a schedule change and inform customers who were booked on a MAX from March 5 through April 6?
Answer: American had previously canceled service on the MAX through March 4. On Dec. 22, American will run a formal schedule change, and customers who were previously booked on a MAX through April 6 will see their reservation updated on aa.com.

Question: Will there be additional changes to the schedule once the MAX returns to commercial service?
Answer: American expects to gradually phase in the MAX for commercial service and will increase flying on the aircraft throughout the month of April. Since American will gradually phase the MAX into our operation over the course of a month, additional refinements to our schedule may occur. Affected customers will be contacted directly.

Question: My flight wasn’t scheduled to be on a MAX. Will it be canceled?
Answer: A flight that was not scheduled as a MAX flight might be canceled to enable our team to cover a MAX route with a different aircraft, in order to affect the smallest number of customers. In total, approximately 140 flights will be canceled per day through April 6.

Question: How will customers know if they are impacted?
Answer: American’s Reservations team will contact affected customers directly by email or telephone beginning Dec. 22. Customers who booked through a travel agent will be contacted by their agency directly.

Question: What is American’s rebooking policy for when the MAX returns?
Answer: Details regarding policies and procedures for customers who do not wish to fly on the MAX once the aircraft enters scheduled service April 7 will be released in the coming weeks.

Question: My flight was canceled and I don’t want to rebook. Can I get a refund?
Answer: Yes. If a flight is canceled and a customer chooses to not be rebooked, they may request a full refund by visiting aa.com/refunds.

Indonesian investigators blame a series of mistakes for the crash of Lion Air 610

Delivered August 13, 2018, crashed into the Java Sea on October 29, 2018

National Transportation Safety Committee (NTSC) of Indonesia has issued their final report on the crash of Lion Air flight 610.

The investigators faulted Boeing, Lion Air and the pilots for the tragic crash.

The report criticized the purchase of the critical sensor from a Florida repair shop that had not been properly tested and calibrated.

The report spotlighted 9 things that contributed to the accident.

Reliance on the single angle-of-attack sensor made MCAS more vulnerable to failure.

Read more from the BBC.

Boeing issued this response to the report:

Boeing Statement On Lion Air Flight 610 Investigation Final Report.

Boeing issued the following statement regarding the release of the final investigation report of Lion Air Flight 610 by Indonesia’s National Transportation Safety Committee (KNKT):

“On behalf of everyone at Boeing, I want to convey our heartfelt condolences to the families and loved ones of those who lost their lives in these accidents. We mourn with Lion Air, and we would like to express our deepest sympathies to the Lion Air family,” said Boeing President & CEO Dennis Muilenburg. “These tragic events have deeply affected us all and we will always remember what happened.”

“We commend Indonesia’s National Transportation Safety Committee for its extensive efforts to determine the facts of this accident, the contributing factors to its cause and recommendations aimed toward our common goal that this never happens again.”

“We are addressing the KNKT’s safety recommendations, and taking actions to enhance the safety of the 737 MAX to prevent the flight control conditions that occurred in this accident from ever happening again. Safety is an enduring value for everyone at Boeing and the safety of the flying public, our customers, and the crews aboard our airplanes is always our top priority. We value our long-standing partnership with Lion Air and we look forward to continuing to work together in the future.”

Boeing experts, working as technical advisors to the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board, have supported the KNKT over the course of the investigation. The company’s engineers have been working with the US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and other global regulators to make software updates and other changes, taking into account the information from the KNKT’s investigation.

Since this accident, the 737 MAX and its software are undergoing an unprecedented level of global regulatory oversight, testing and analysis. This includes hundreds of simulator sessions and test flights, regulatory analysis of thousands of documents, reviews by regulators and independent experts and extensive certification requirements.

Over the past several months Boeing has been making changes to the 737 MAX. Most significantly, Boeing has redesigned the way Angle of Attack (AoA) sensors work with a feature of the flight control software known as Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System (MCAS). Going forward, MCAS will compare information from both AoA sensors before activating, adding a new layer of protection.

In addition, MCAS will now only turn on if both AoA sensors agree, will only activate once in response to erroneous AOA, and will always be subject to a maximum limit that can be overridden with the control column.

These software changes will prevent the flight control conditions that occurred in this accident from ever happening again.

In addition, Boeing is updating crew manuals and pilot training, designed to ensure every pilot has all of the information they need to fly the 737 MAX safely.

Boeing continues to work with the FAA and other regulatory agencies worldwide on the certification of the software update and training program to safely return the 737 MAX to service.

Top Copyright Photo: Lion Air (PT Lion Mentari Airlines) Boeing 737-8 MAX 8 PK-LQP (msn 43000) BFI (James Helbock). Image: 944189.

 

 

American Airlines provides an update on the Boeing 737 MAX

American Airlines has made this announcement:

American Airlines anticipates that the impending software updates to the Boeing 737 MAX will lead to recertification of the aircraft later this year and resumption of commercial service in January 2020. We are in continuous contact with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and Department of Transportation (DOT).

What customers need to know

  • Customers booked on a MAX through Jan. 6: All customers who were booked previously on a MAX will be automatically accommodated on the same flights operated by a 737-800 with the same seat configuration. No additional rebooking will be required.
  • Customers booked on a MAX from Jan. 7 through Jan. 15: The majority of these customers will be accommodated on the same flight operated by a different aircraft type, which may include a 737-800 or an Airbus aircraft. Beginning Oct. 13, American’s Reservations and Sales team will contact affected customers who are impacted by any potential flight cancellations. Customers who booked through a travel agent will be contacted by their agency directly.
  • Beginning Jan. 16: American expects to slowly phase in the MAX for commercial service and will increase flying on the aircraft throughout the month and into February.

Frequently asked questions

Question: My flight through Jan. 15 was scheduled on a MAX. Will it be canceled?
Answer: All flights through Jan. 6 that were previously scheduled on a MAX will not be canceled, as we plan to substitute other aircraft types. The majority of customers who were booked previously on a MAX from Jan. 7 through Jan. 15 will be accommodated on the same flights operated by a different aircraft type. On Oct. 13, American will run a formal schedule change, and customers who were previously booked on a MAX will see their reservation updated on aa.com.

Question: Will there be additional changes to the schedule once the MAX returns to commercial service?
Answer: American expects to slowly phase in the MAX for commercial service and will increase flying on the aircraft throughout the month and into February. Since American will slowly phase the MAX in our operation over the course of a month, additional refinements to our schedule may occur through Feb. 12. Affected customers will be contacted directly.

Question: My flight wasn’t scheduled to be on a MAX. Will it be canceled?
Answer: A flight that was not scheduled as a MAX flight might be canceled to enable our team to cover a MAX route with a different aircraft, in order to affect the smallest number of customers. In total, approximately 140 flights will be canceled per day through Jan. 15.

Question: How will customers know if they are impacted?
Answer: American’s Reservations team will contact affected customers directly by email or telephone beginning Oct. 13. Customers who booked through a travel agent will be contacted by their agency directly.

Question: What is American’s policy for when the MAX returns?
Answer: Details regarding policies and procedures for customers who do not wish to fly on the MAX once the aircraft enters scheduled service Jan. 16 will be released in the coming weeks.

Question: My flight was canceled and I don’t want to rebook. Can I get a refund?
Answer: Yes. If a flight is canceled and a customer chooses to not be rebooked, they may request a full refund by visiting aa.com/refunds.

Photo: American Airlines.

SWAPA files lawsuit against Boeing over the grounding of the Boeing 737 MAX

SWAPA has issued this statement:

The Southwest Airlines Pilots Association (SWAPA) today announced that it has filed a lawsuit against The Boeing Company for deliberately misleading the organization and its pilots about the 737 MAX aircraft.

The lawsuit, filed in the District Court of Dallas County, Texas, alleges that SWAPA pilots agreed to fly the 737 MAX aircraft based on Boeing’s representations that it was airworthy and essentially the same as the time- tested 737 aircraft that its pilots have flown for years. These representations were false. Boeing’s errors cost the lives of 346 people, damaged the critical bond between pilots and passengers, and reduced opportunities for air travel across the United States and around the world.

“As pilots, there is nothing more important to us than the safety of our passengers,” said Captain Jonathan L. Weaks, President of SWAPA. “We have to be able to trust Boeing to truthfully disclose the information we need to safely operate our aircraft. In the case of the 737 MAX, that absolutely did not happen.”

The grounding of the 737 MAX has caused the elimination of more than 30,000 scheduled Southwest flights. This is expected to reduce the airline’s passenger service 8% by the end of 2019, resulting in compensation losses for SWAPA pilots in excess of $100 million. Southwest is the largest operator of the 737 MAX, and the aircraft is not expected to return to passenger service until the first quarter of 2020.

“It is critical that Boeing takes whatever time is necessary to safely return the MAX to service,” added Captain Weaks. “Our pilots should not be expected to take a significant and ever-expanding financial loss as a result of Boeing’s negligence. We look forward to a solution that helps Boeing restore the confidence of both the flying public and the pilots who operate its aircraft.”