Category Archives: KLM Royal Dutch Airlines

KLM pilots will take their caps off

KLM made this announcement:

Pilots have worn caps since the earliest days of KLM’s existence. Over the years, the style and look of the cap has changed to suit the fashion of the day.

KLM no longer sees any added value in pilots wearing caps.  Besides, the aim is to give pilots a more modern and accessible appearance. Consequently, the pilot’s cap for women and men will no longer be worn at KLM and KLM Cityhopper from January 1, 2018.

Similarly, some other airlines and occupations have either done away with the cap, which traditionally formed part of the uniform, or they have come up with alternatives.

Caps donation to ‘Stichting Hoogvliegers’

Pilots may keep their caps or donates them to ‘Stichting Hoogvliegers’. KLM worked for many years with this foundation, which offers children who are ill a chance to be pilot for a day.

Photos: KLM.

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KLM and Air France introduce new ticket options in Economy Class for flights between Europe and North America

KLM Royal Dutch Airlines Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner PH-BHA (msn 36113) YYZ (TMK Photography). Image: 937278.

KLM Royal Durch Airlines has issued this statement:

Passengers can choose from a wide range of ticket options. As part of our aim to create a customised offer at the best price, KLM and Air France are introducing new fares for flights between Europe and USA and/or Canada. As of December 7, 2017, we will offer our Economy Class customers 3 different ticket options. After selecting their preferred fare they can choose to add various extra services.

Delta Air Lines and Alitalia, the joint venture partners of KLM and Air France, will also announce the introduction of similar fare structure across the Atlantic.

Different ticket options

The three new ticket options, named ‘Light’, ‘Standard’ and ‘Standard +’, have distinct features that will fit the needs of any Economy Class passenger between Europe and USA and/or Canada. Shown in one concise overview, customers can see which services and conditions come with each option, making it easy to compare.

  • ‘Light’ is a good option for passengers travelling with hand luggage only
  • ‘Standard’ is the best choice for those who do prefer to bring check-in baggage
  • With ‘Standard +’, passengers can check in their luggage and get the flexibility to cancel or change their ticket at a fee.

No matter which ticket option one chooses; snacks, meals, beverages and inflight entertainment on board are always included.

Creating a customised journeyWith the new ticket options, we can offer KLM and Air France passengers customised fares at the best price. After choosing a ticket option, customers can easily add various extra services.For example, they can select an extra comfortable seat type or order an à la carte meal – immediately when booking or later.

Flying Blue privileges

Flying Blue Elite – and Elite Plus members keep the advantages of their tier level. They can always bring one extra piece of check-in baggage for free. So, when choosing the ‘Light’ fare, they may still check in one bag at no extra cost. With ‘Standard’ or ‘Standard +’, they can bring a piece of check-in baggage on top of the one included in these ticket options.

Ivory members will receive EUR 10 off the price of their first piece of paid check-in baggage, if purchased online up to 24 hours before departure.

Copyright Photo: KLM Royal Dutch Airlines Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner PH-BHA (msn 36113) YYZ (TMK Photography). Image: 937278.

WestJet, Air France and KLM launch reciprocal frequent flyer redemption

WestJet's first Boeing 737-8 MAX 8

WestJet, Air France and KLM on November 15, 2017 announced the redemption phase of their reciprocal frequent flyer agreement. Flying Blue Miles can now be redeemed for WestJet flights and WestJet dollars can now be redeemed for flights within the Air France and KLM global network.

The announcement comes on the heels of the airlines’ successful launch of the earn phase of the reciprocal frequent flyer agreement and further complements their long-standing code share cooperation.

Members of WestJet Rewards can now redeem WestJet dollars on Air France-KLM destinations in Europe, Africa, Asia and the Middle East. Members of Air France-KLM’s Flying Blue program can now redeem their Flying Blue Miles to WestJet destinations throughout Canada, the U.S., Mexico, the Caribbean and Central America.

Copyright Photo: WestJet Airlines Boeing 737-8 MAX 8 C-FRAX (msn 60510) YYZ (TMK Photography). Image: 939575.

Air France-KLM Group report their third quarter financial results

Air France Airbus A380-861 F-HPJA (msn 033) TLS. Image: 904814.

Air France-KLM Group reported their third quarter financial results:

Jean-Marc Janaillac made the following comments: “The strong operating performance achieved by the Group in the third quarter reflects a sustained execution on our strategic priorities, as well as a robust business environment translated into solid traffic and unit revenue trends. We continued to move forward notably with the expansion of our network of strategic alliances and the implementation of a new distribution model. At the same time, we relentlessly pursued our efforts to strengthen our financial structure. All of these accomplishments demonstrate that Air France-KLM is well on track to deliver on Trust Together strategic priorities of growing revenues and improve competitiveness.”

Third Quarter

Nine months

2017 Change

2017 Change

Passengers (thousands)
Unit revenue per ASK (€ cts) Operating result (€m)
Net result – group (€m) Operating free cash flow (€m) Net debt at end of period (€m)

27,911 7.03 1,022 552 125

+5.1%

+4.1% +38.7% +1.5% +248

75,056 6.75 1,375 703 793 2,796

+6.0%

+1.8% +44.0% +63.5%

+543 -859

Summary:

Copyright Photo: Air France Airbus A380-861 F-HPJA (msn 033) TLS. Image: 904814.

Air France:

KLM says goodbye to the last Fokker

KLM's farewell salute to Anthony Fokker

KLM Cityhopper, as planned, operated its last revenue flight of a Fokker 70. The pictured F.28 Mk. 0070 PH-KZU, decorated in the special Fokker tribute livery, operated flight KL1070 from London (Heathrow) to the Amsterdam base. The flight blocked in at 8:35 pm (2035) local time.

Top Copyright Photo: KLM Cityhopper Fokker F.28 Mk. 0070 (Fokker 70) PH-KZU (msn 11543) (Fokker – Anthony Fokker – Farewell) AMS (Ton Jochems). Image: 938128.

KLM issued this retirement story by Charley Valette on its KLM Blog:

Fokker aircraft were a common sight at Amsterdam Airport Schiphol for many decade. Although they have become increasingly scarce in recent times, this did not diminish the passion for this reliable Dutch product. Aviation buffs and plane spotter in the Netherlands all know that Fokker’s days in Dutch service will draw to a close on 28 October 2017.

On that date, KLM Cityhopper will bid farewell to its last Fokkers. The past months have seen many people booking tickets for a final flight aboard a Fokker. There were also lots of cameras along the perimeter fences, especially when one of the last Fokker 70s was specially decorated for the farewell. The accompanying text says it all: “Thank You, Fokker”.

Perfect design for commuter jets

Many readers will be familiar with the post-war Fokkers: the F27, F28, F50, F100 and F70. All of these excellent, reliable, economic aircraft were very modern in their day, but the Fokker 70 was the best of the bunch. Although Fokker only built 48 of these aircraft before it went bankrupt, the F70 paved the way towards a perfect design formula for commuter jets.

In keeping with history, KLM Cityhopper chose to operate its last Fokker flight out of the London, with an English captain at the controls. When flight KL1070 from London Heathrow shuts down its Rolls-Royce Tay engines at Schiphol, the Fokker era at KLM will come to an end. However, the special bond between KLM and Fokker will live on in memory. Looking back on this era, many of the events can be captured as “what if” questions.

Fokker

What if KLM had not been allowed to operate flights to the United Kingdom with Fokkers?

KLM ordered its first Fokker aircraft in 1920, marking the start of their shared history, in which two great companies inspired each other to take great steps. However, the budding relationship between KLM and Fokker might have ended right there. In fact, Fokker/KLM administrator Albert Plesman, who later became KLM’s first CEO, included a very explicit resolutive condition in the procurement contract for the first Fokkers ordered by KLM.

Schiphol Fokker

Plesman did so just in case the British government would withhold permission to operate flights to the UK with Fokkers, which were seen as a mortal enemy by the British immediately after the First World War, because Germany’s dominant fleet of Fokker fighter planes were known to have prolonged the war.

Fokker Oldie

Eventually, KLM was permitted to fly Fokkers to England. To make this momentous milestone all the more special, the first scheduled Fokker service to Croydon near London on 14 April 1921 was operated by a British pilot.

Another question: what if there had been no Second World War and Fokker had not been spurred on by Plesman’s claims that the company was incapable of producing a modern aircraft?

Would the aircraft manufacturer have completed the development of both the F24 and the “flying wing” Project 180, the first truly intercontinental airliner? Would KLM have operated flights to many destinations with large, aluminium Fokker aircraft for decades?

And what if the dollar exchange rate hadn’t declined sharply against the Deutschmark and Dutch guilder in the 1990s?

Could Fokker have avoided bankruptcy and profited from the recovering airline market? Would it have developed a new generation of aircraft? And would those aircraft have worn KLM colours?

Fokker

Although these questions will never be conclusively answered, many things did gradually become clear for the editorial team creating the book “Dutch at Heart”, which celebrates KLM’s Fokker fleet. Based on the stories of KLM and Fokker staff as well as the curator, the bond between these two great Dutch companies is recounted from the day of establishment to the final weeks. You can order the book here: www.Fokker-70.nl.

3 = 1

At the end of October, Fokker aircraft will be leaving the Dutch commercial air transport scene for good. That leaves only two members of the Dutch Aviation Trinity – KLM, Fokker and Schiphol – as well as the memories of an era in which Fokker played a leading role in our industry. These memories are captured in the Fokker monument, symbolically uniting KLM, Fokker and Schiphol, which KLM Cityhopper will unveil at Schiphol Oost on 29 October 2017.

Fokker 70

I’ve been flying for KLM since 1985. Right now I’m a captain on the Boeing 777. Before that, I flew the Boeing DC-9, 737-300, 400 747-200, 300, and 400, Fokker 28, and the MD-11.

Videos:

KLM announces the last Fokker 70 flights

Thank you and farewell to Anthony Fokker and the Fokker fleet

KLM issued this statement:

KLM wants to reflect in appropriate style on the end of the 97-year partnership between KLM and Fokker. The phasing out of the Fokker 70 at KLM Cityhopper marks the end of an extraordinary period for the Dutch airline industry.

So many KLM fans would like to be aboard one of the final Fokker flights on October 28, 2017, that we are publishing the flight schedule below.

 DUS – Düsseldorf KL1862 arrival Amsterdam 19.05 hrs*

NWI- Norwich KL1512 arrival Amsterdam 19.15 hrs*

HAJ – Hannover KL1912 arrival Amsterdam 19.15 hrs*

BRU – Brussel KL1732 arrival Amsterdam 19.15 hrs*

LUX – Luxembourg KL1746 arrival Amsterdam 19.35 hrs*

LHR – London KL1070 arrival Amsterdam 20.30 hrs *

*Local time

Especially for fans

That the very last commercial Fokker flight will depart from London is no coincidence. Soon after the first passenger flights took place on May 17, 1920, two Fokkers joined the KLM fleet as the first passenger aircraft to be owned by KLM: these Fokker IIs bore the registration numbers H-NABC and H-NABD. The first commercial flight with a Fokker II was on September 15, 1920 to London. The arrival of the Fokker 70 from London on October 28, 2017 will complete the circle.

Modernizing the fleet

KLM Cityhopper began replacing its Fokker fleet with the modern E-Jet, Embraer 190 and Embraer 175 in 2008. These new aircraft are facilitating further expansion of the existing network, higher flight frequencies, and lower costs. This wide-ranging modernisation means KLM Cityhopper can contribute to a more efficient and environmentally friendly operation in which quality and passenger comfort are top priorities.

Copyright Photo: KLM Cityhopper Fokker F.28 Mk. 0070 (Fokker 70) PH-KZU (msn 11543) (Fokker – Anthony Fokker – Farewell) AMS (Antony J. Best). Image: 938597.

KLM welcomes its tenth Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner named “Marguerite” (Margriet)

KLM’s Dreamliners are named for flowers or flowering plants, a typical Dutch export product, which suits KLM well. Other Boeing 787s have received names such as Zonnebloem (Sunflower), Anjer (Carnation), Dahlia, and Lavendel (Lavender). The ninth Dreamliner, delivered in July, bears the name Lelie (Lily).

More comfortable and eco-friendly

The Boeing 787 creates less noise, consumes les fuel, and gives off fewer carbon dioxide emissions. It brings us ever closer to our aim to reduce CO2 emissions by 20% in 2020 compared to 2011. The Dreamliner is built mainly of carbon fibre composite which can be cut easily, so the manufacturing process creates less waste.

The aircraft also offers numerous advantages in terms of passenger comfort. The increased cabin air pressure helps passengers to arrive at their destination feeling well rested. Passengers who want to be online during their flight have access to WiFi.

Next Dreamliner expected in January 2018

KLM took receipt of its first Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner in November of 2015. In January 2018, we are expecting our eleventh Dreamliner.

Photos by Patrick Kop/KLM.