Tag Archives: Hawaiian Airlines

Hawaiian Holdings loses $97.1 million in the third quarter, delays 787 Dreamliner deliveries

Hawaiian Holdings, Inc., parent company of Hawaiian Airlines, Inc., today reported its financial results for the third quarter of 2020.

Third Quarter 2020 – Key Financial Metrics

GAAP

YoY Change

Adjusted

YoY Change

Net Income

($97.1M)

($177.2M)

($172.7M)

($254.1M)

Diluted EPS

($2.11)

($3.81)

($3.76)

($5.48)

Pre-tax Margin

(189.0)%

(203.4) pts.

(321.4)%

(336) pts.

“The COVID-19 pandemic and State of Hawai’i quarantines continued to have a dramatic effect on our business in the third quarter,” said Peter Ingram, Hawaiian Airlines President and CEO.  “Despite these monumental challenges, my colleagues throughout the business have done an incredible job adapting to the evolving environment.  We have taken action to reduce expenses, preserve cash, bolster our liquidity and care for our guests, positioning us to begin the recovery process in earnest with the introduction of the State of Hawai’i’s pre-travel testing regime in the fourth quarter.”

Liquidity and Capital Resources

As of September 30, 2020, the Company had:

  • Unrestricted cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments of $979 million
  • Outstanding debt and finance lease obligations of $1,299 million
  • Air traffic liability of $515 million

Third Quarter 2020

The State of Hawai’i was under mandatory 14-day self-quarantine for all incoming travelers throughout the third quarter of 2020, and for neighbor island travel starting from August 11, 2020 and as a consequence, the Company operated an extremely limited schedule during the third quarter.

During the quarter, the Company implemented both permanent and extended voluntary leave programs with each of its workgroups, and prepared for involuntary reductions effective October 1, 2020.  In total, the Company reduced its workforce by approximately 2,400 employees, or more than 32 percent of all employees, of which almost 2,100 were through voluntary means.

To increase liquidity, the Company closed on approximately $421 million of new financing during the quarter, including:

  • Raising approximately $114 million through the sale and leaseback of two Airbus A321neo aircraft
  • Raising approximately $262 million through the issuance of Enhanced Equipment Trust Certificates backed by two Airbus A330 aircraft and six Airbus A321neo aircraft
  • Drawing approximately $45 million of the $420 million available through the Economic Relief Program (“ERP”) loans offered under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (the “CARES Act”)

As of September 30, 2020, the Company has received $240.6 million in grants and $60.3 million in loans pursuant to the CARES Act Payroll Support Program (“PSP”), of which $38 million was received in the third quarter.

In October 2020, the Company executed an amendment with the U.S.Treasuryincreasing the total amount of the ERP loan from $420 million to $622 million, of which $577 million is undrawn; the Company has until March 2021 to determine how much of the remaining ERP funds to borrow.

Guest Experience

During the third quarter, the Company announced the following guest experience improvements:

  • Eliminated change fees on all domestic and international flights in order to provide guests with travel flexibility across its network
  • Launched a program to offer guests pre-travel COVID-19 testing through mail-in test kits and proprietary drive-through testing labs in select U.S. mainland gateways

In addition, the Company continued its enhanced cleaning procedures and revised guest-facing procedures as part of its health and safety program, which is aligned with current recommendations from leading public health authorities.

The Company currently has limited capacity to 70 percent on its flights through December 15, 2020.

Fourth Quarter 2020

The State of Hawai’i launched a pre-travel testing program for travelers entering the State on or after October 15, 2020.  Travelers who choose to participate in the program can bypass the State’s mandatory 14-day quarantine with proof of a negative COVID-19 test from one of the State’s approved testing partners.

The Company expects its fourth quarter 2020 capacity to be approximately 70 percent below the capacity flown during the same period last year.  As a significant portion of the Company’s costs are fixed, operating expenses are not expected to decline in proportion to the capacity decline.

In October 2020, the Company reached an agreement with Boeing to push back the timing of 787-9 deliveries under its purchase agreement for 10 aircraft.  The Company now expects to take delivery of 787-9 aircraft from 2022 to 2026 with its first aircraft to be delivered in September 2022.

 

Hawaiian Airlines welcomes back Boston and New York

Hawaiian Airlines, Hawai‘i’s hometown carrier, will reinstate its long-awaited East Coast flying in December with twice-weekly nonstop service between Honolulu’s Daniel K. Inouye International Airport (HNL) and Boston Logan International Airport (BOS) and thrice-weekly service between HNL and New York’s John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK).

Hawaiian Airlines Airbus A330

At the same time, Hawaiian will resume daily nonstop service between HNL and Long Beach Airport (LGB), offering guests access to its entire 13-city U.S. mainland network. The state of Hawai‘i last week began exempting travelers from its 14-day quarantine with proof of a negative COVID-19 state-approved test within 72 hours of the final leg of departure.

Hawaiian will also bring back nonstop flights between Kaua‘i’s Līhuʻe Airport (LIH) and Los Angeles and Oakland, and between Maui’s Kahului Airport (OGG) and San Diego and San Francisco, utilizing its narrow-body Airbus A321neo aircraft.

 

Hawaiian Airlines expands pre-travel COVID-19 testing options with convenient at-home service

Hawaiian Airlines today began offering travelers visiting or returning to the Hawaiian Islands from the U.S. mainland a pre-travel COVID-19 test they can take from the comfort of their home to qualify to be exempt from the state of Hawai‘i quarantine.

Hawaiian’s guests can order the $150 mail-in saliva test online through Vault Health. The test kit, which is available for travelers of all ages including children, will be express mailed overnight to guests who will self-collect their sample with assistance from a testing supervisor in a video call. The kit is express shipped overnight to Vault’s lab, which will process and analyze the sample and provide travelers their results electronically within 24 hours.

Beginning Oct. 15, travelers with a negative COVID-19 test taken at a state-approved testing facility within 72 hours of the final leg of departure will be exempt from Hawai‘i’s 14-day quarantine upon arrival.

HA Vault

 

“We are excited to offer our guests at any of our U.S. mainland gateway cities a convenient way to take a pre-travel COVID-19 test that meets the state of Hawai‘i’s requirements, and we look forward to welcoming them onboard and to our islands soon,” said Avi Mannis, senior vice president of marketing at Hawaiian Airlines. “In addition to expanding testing availability and options, we have adopted comprehensive health and safety protocols throughout the travel journey to protect our guests, employees and community.”

“We’re happy to provide quick, accurate COVID-19 test results to Hawaiian Airlines guests,” said Vault Health Founder and CEO Jason Feldman. “The test is easy to take at home, pain-free, and limits exposure or use of personal protective equipment. We provide comfort in having you know your status from your own home, before travel.”

Hawaiian’s new at-home COVID-19 test option, facilitated by Vault Health, adds to the carrier’s partnership with Worksite Labs that will provide guests exclusive access to drive-through PCR testing ($90 for results within 36 hours, or $150 for day-of-travel express service) from dedicated, conveniently located labs near Los Angeles (LAX) and San Francisco (SFO) international airports, with more testing locations coming soon to its other U.S. mainland gateways.

Details about testing options for Hawaiian’s guests are available here.

Hawaiian’s comprehensive health and safety program covers all aspects of the travel journey, starting at check-in, when guests must complete a health acknowledgment form indicating they are free of COVID-19 symptoms and will wear an adequate face mask or covering at the airport and during the flight. Guests 2 years of age and older who are unable to wear a face mask or covering due to a medical condition or disability must undergo a health screening to board.

Hawaiian’s “Keeping you Safe” enhanced cleaning includes frequent disinfecting of lobby areas, kiosks, and ticket counters, electrostatic aircraft cabin spraying, plexiglass barriers at staffed airport counters, and sanitizer wipe distribution to all guests. The carrier, which has been operating a reduced schedule since March due to the pandemic and resulting travel restrictions, will continue to cap cabin capacity at 70 percent through Dec. 15 to allow for onboard distancing.

Hawaiian Airlines aircraft photo gallery:

Hawaiian Airlines to offer guests drive-through pre-travel COVID-19 tests

Hawaiian Airlines has made this announcement:

Hawaiian Airlines is making it easy for travelers to finally take a long-awaited Hawai‘i vacation with convenient drive-through COVID-19 tests in select U.S. mainland gateways that will allow guests to bypass the state of Hawai‘i quarantine and begin enjoying the islands from the moment they arrive.

Hawaiian’s partnership with Worksite Labs will give guests exclusive access to drive-through PCR testing ($90 for results within 36 hours, or $150 for day-of-travel express service) from dedicated, conveniently located labs. Hawai‘i’s hometown carrier expects to start offering the Droplet Digital PCR shallow nasal swab tests – a “gold standard” COVID-19 screening that meets state of Hawai‘i guidelines – around Oct. 15, when travelers who test negative within 72 hours of departure will be exempt from Hawai‘i’s 14-day quarantine upon arrival.

Hawaiian’s initial labs will be operational near Los Angeles (LAX) and San Francisco (SFO) international airports, with more testing locations coming soon at its other U.S. mainland gateways.

“As Hawai’i’s leading airline, it is critical to ensure that access to testing does not impede travel to Hawai‘i, for visitors or our kama‘āina (residents),” said Avi Mannis, senior vice president of marketing at Hawaiian Airlines. “Our testing option will offer Los Angeles and Bay Area travelers superior value and we look forward to expanding the program and bringing additional choices to more of our gateway cities as we welcome guests back with our industry-leading Hawaiian hospitality, while keeping our community safe. We’re grateful to the state of Hawai‘i for its partnership in developing the pre-travel testing program.”

“Worksite Labs is proud to offer Hawaiian this innovative solution as we work to combat the current pandemic and provide more testing options so travelers can understand their COVID-19 status and enjoy their trip to Hawai‘i while stimulating the local economy,” said Gary Frazier, CEO of Worksite Labs.

Hawaiian Airlines is actively developing additional testing partnerships to support travelers’ needs, with more to be announced soon. The state of Hawai‘i also continues to expand its list of partners for testing.

In addition to offering its guests convenient testing, Hawaiian has implemented a comprehensive health and safety program covering all aspects of their journey.

Starting at check-in, guests must complete a health acknowledgment formindicating they are free of COVID-19 symptoms and will wear an adequate face mask or covering at the airport and during the flight. Guests 2 years of age and older who are unable to wear a face mask or covering due to a medical condition or disability must undergo a health screening to board.

Hawaiian’s “Keeping you Safe” enhanced cleaning includes frequent disinfecting of lobby areas, kiosks, and ticket counters, electrostatic aircraft cabin spraying, plexiglass barriers at staffed airport counters, and sanitizer wipe distribution to all guests. The carrier, which has been operating a reduced schedule since March due to the pandemic and resulting travel restrictions, will continue to leave 70 percent cabin capacity through October to allow for onboard distancing.

All travelers arriving in Hawai‘i or flying between the islands must now also complete the state’s online Safe Travels Hawai‘i form.

Hawaiian loses $106.9 million in the second quarter

Hawaiian Airlines reported its financial results for the second quarter of 2020.

Second Quarter 2020 – Key Financial Metrics

GAAP

YoY Change

Adjusted

YoY Change

Net Income

($106.9M)

($164.7M)

($174.7M)

($233.6M)

Diluted EPS

($2.33)

($3.54)

($3.81)

($5.04)

Pre-tax Margin

(254.2)%

(265.4) pts.

(383.9)%

(395.3) pts.

“Our second quarter results reflect the continued impact of COVID-19 and State of Hawai’i quarantines on our business,” said Peter Ingram, Hawaiian Airlines President and CEO.  “In the face of these unprecedented challenges, we have taken action to preserve and raise cash and are crafting plans to position us for the future even as we address the immediate adversity.  With our leisure business model and relentless focus on the needs of the Hawai’i traveler, we are positioned to emerge from this crisis poised for success.  I am grateful, as always, for the efforts of my extraordinary colleagues, as they take care of our guests and adapt to this ever-changing environment with passion and dedication.”

Liquidity and Capital Resources

As of June 30, 2020, the Company had:

  • Unrestricted cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments of $761 million
  • Outstanding debt and finance lease obligations of $1,006 million
  • Air traffic liability of $554 million

Second Quarter 2020

The State of Hawai’i was under the mandatory 14-day self-quarantine for both neighbor island and all incoming travelers for most of the second quarter of 2020, and as a consequence, the Company operated an extremely limited schedule. The mandatory 14-day self-quarantine restriction was lifted on June 16, 2020 for neighbor island travel only. Following this announcement, the Company increased neighbor island flight activity, but continued with its reduced schedule for longer haul flights.

In addition to service suspension and schedule reduction, the Company has taken, and will continue to take, actions to minimize cash outflow in an effort to mitigate the effects of reduced demand, including, but not limited to:

  • Suspended dividend payments on, and the repurchase of, its common stock
  • Instituted a hiring freeze across the Company, except for operationally critical and essential positions
  • Deferred non-critical capital expenditures
  • Instituted voluntary unpaid leave programs and exploring involuntary headcount reduction
  • Reduced executive pay by 10% – 50%
  • Reduced other discretionary spending, including contractor and vendor spend
  • Negotiated payment deferrals with key vendors

As of June 30, 2020, the Company has received $214.2 million in grants and $49.0 millionin loans pursuant to the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (the “CARES Act”) Payroll Support Program (“PSP”). The Company expects to receive an additional $29.2 million in July 2020.

Third Quarter 2020

Due to the uncertain timing of the relaxation of travel and quarantine restrictions, the Company is unable to provide detailed guidance related to capacity expectations for the quarter ending September 30, 2020.  July 2020 capacity, in terms of available seat miles (ASMs), is expected to be approximately 86% below the capacity flown in July 2019, and the Company expects August 2020 capacity to decrease 85% compared to August 2019.  As a significant portion of the Company’s costs are fixed, operating expenses are not expected to decline in proportion to the capacity decline.

To further increase liquidity, the Company has entered into additional financing transactions in July 2020. This includes the following:

  • Raised $114 million through the sale and leaseback of two Airbus A321neo aircraft
  • Signed a non-binding letter of intent with the U.S. Department of Treasury pursuant to which the Company is eligible to receive up to $364 million in Economic Relief Program (“ERP”) loans offered under the CARES Act; the Company has until March 2021 to determine how much of the available ERP funds to borrow.

COVID-19 Response – Guest Experience and Community Relations

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Company has enhanced cleaning procedures and revised guest-facing procedures in an effort to minimize the risk of transmission of COVID-19. These procedures are in line with current recommendations from leading public health authorities and include:

  • Performing enhanced aircraft cleaning between flights and overnight, including recurring electrostatic spraying of all aircraft
  • Frequent cleaning and disinfecting of counters and self-service check-in kiosks in our airports
  • Ensuring hand sanitizers are readily available for guests statewide and at our mainland airports
  • Requiring guests and guest-facing employees to wear face masks or coverings, with guests required to keep them on from check-in to deplaning
  • Modifying boarding and deplaning processes and limiting the capacity of available seats on all aircraft to no higher than 70% to provide physical distancing
  • Changing in-flight service to reduce close interactions between crew members and guests

The Company, along with its employees, has also taken measures to support the community through the COVID-19 pandemic, which include:

  • Donating Main Cabin and Business Class pillowcases, blankets, mattress pads, amenity kits, and Business Class slippers to 12 local organizations serving the community during the pandemic
  • Offering complimentary neighbor island transportation for medical professionals in April and May
  • Providing complimentary transportation of food and household items from O’ahu to both Moloka’i and Lana’i in April and May
  • Volunteering to support local non-profit organizations addressing the COVID-19 pandemic, from company-wide efforts to individual employee initiatives

Hawaiian Airlines aircraft photo gallery:

Hawaiian Airlines aircraft slide show:

https://airlinersgallery.smugmug.com/frame/slideshow?key=6fcqqg&speed=3&transition=fade&autoStart=1&captions=0&navigation=0&playButton=0&randomize=0&transitionSpeed=2

Hawaiian: Keeping our parked planes in flying shape

From Hawaiian Airlines:

After over 90 years of service, images of our fleet on the ground and not in the sky are a powerful reminder of the severity of this crisis. At any given time, at least 52 of 61 aircraft in our jet fleet can be seen resting on HNL’s tarmac, waiting for the moment they can reconnect Hawai‘i to the world.

As the only major Hawai‘i-based airline, with over 90 years of service to our community, images of our fleet on the ground and not in the sky serve as a powerful daily reminder of the severity of this crisis.

You may have seen the photos and videos of runway 8L and Taxiway Foxtrot at Honolulu’s Daniel K. Inouye International Airport (HNL), where we have temporarily parked many of our Hawaiian Airlines aircraft due to COVID-19 developments affecting travel.

As the only major Hawai‘i-based airline, with over 90 years of service to our community, images of our fleet on the ground and not in the sky serve as a powerful daily reminder of the severity of this crisis. At any given time, at least 52 aircraft in our 61 jet fleet can be seen resting on HNL’s tarmac, waiting for the moment they can reconnect Hawai‘i to the world.

Airbus A330s lined up on runway 8L at HNL.

While we rotate certain aircraft in a significantly reduced schedule designed to maintain essential connectivity for our community and shippers, including complimentary Neighbor Island flights to healthcare providersOpens external link to page that may not meet accessibility guidelines this month, our parked planes continue to get plenty of care from our mechanics. Our roughly 500-person maintenance team – from mechanics to engineers and supply agents – has been working around the clock to properly service our aircraft and keep our fleet in tip-top flying shape to bring our full network back online when we are ready to do so.

“Working during this COVID-19 pandemic is surreal. Every day we come to work, we see nearly the entire fleet of aircraft grounded,” said Brandon Ho, line aircraft mechanic at Hawaiian. “Regardless, we still show up to work and do our job to assure the planes are fit to fly when the time comes.”

During a visit to our Honolulu maintenance hangar, Jonathan Yang, director of line maintenance, inspects slight damage to an aircraft’s shell. His team is hard at work servicing our fleet, including reporting, mapping out and repairing any fuselage damage.

Our transpacific routes now include one daily non-stop flight between HNL and San Francisco (SFO) and Los Angeles (LAX). Three of our 24 long-haul wide-body Airbus A330s are taking turns operating these two routes, while the remaining aircraft receive ongoing service. We also deploy A330s on our now once-weekly nonstop flights connecting HNL and Pago Pago in American Samoa; however, we have suspended this service through at least April 23 at the request of the U.S. territory government as it seeks to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

Airbus A330s lined up on runway 8L at HNL.

Our current fleet of 17 A321neos, our mid-range narrow-body aircraft that serve smaller U.S. West Coast markets, are all parked. We are rotating through our Neighbor Island passenger fleet of 20 Boeing 717s to keep all aircraft running. Our ‘Ohana by Hawaiian operations are following a similar process with two of its ATR 42 passenger aircraft serving the more rural communities of Moloka‘i and Lāna‘i, as well as the all-cargo ATR 72 fleet moving essential cargo between the islands.

Throughout the day and night, our maintenance teams are hard at work at our Honolulu hub and destination stations to ensure our planes remain fine-tuned and ready to fly. They’ve got their tools in hand to perform both multi-level checks (required by the Federal Aviation Administration [FAA], as well as the aircraft and engine manufacturers) and daily maintenance, on the engines and airframe. This work is done regardless of whether the aircraft has flown.

Photo credit: Mitchell Leighton Igcasenza
Our maintenance team has taken this downtime to service every part of our aircraft, including our engines.

“Aircraft maintenance tasks run on clocks. Even though we are flying a reduced flight schedule, the clock keeps ticking and mostly does not care if an airplane is in the air or not,” said Jonathan Yang, director of line maintenance at Hawaiian. Yang oversees 111 line mechanics who, despite an industry-wide slowdown caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, remain busy taking care of each of our planes.

One of our mechanics repairing a piece of sheet metal on the lower portion of a fuselage.

Our mechanics clock in a collective 120 hours each day just performing overnight checks on our 717s.*For our transpacific fleet, mechanics are busy conducting various checks scheduled on weekly, bimonthly, monthly, tri-monthly, and annual intervals.

“We have to continue doing these periodic checks to verify that certain systems and/or components of an aircraft are operating normally. This allows our fleet to remain in a ‘flight ready’ condition,” Yang added.

A Boeing 717 undergoing routine service during a sunny day at HNL. Our 717s are rotating through our reduced Neighbor Island schedule to allow for regular maintenance on each aircraft.

In addition to the scheduled tasks which include routine maintenance from checking tire pressures and maintaining oil levels, our engineers and mechanics are focused on improving the in-flight experience for our guests by making modifications to optimize A321neo cabin temperatures – which is estimated to take mechanics some 140-180 hours per aircraft. We are also conducting robust cabin interior inspections, repair of seats and tray tables and deep cleaning throughout.

Yang inside a stripped-down Airbus A321neo cabin, which is being retrofitted with additional ventilation tubes beneath the floor. The modification is being done to a handful of A321neos and will optimize interior air temperature and circulation.

While the COVID-19 pandemic has created unprecedented challenges for all of us and temporarily changed the landscape of the aviation industry, our guests can remain confident in the safety and reliability that Hawaiian Airlines has been known for over 90 years.

“We all work together to ensure our aircraft are ready to fly when this situation is over. It’s been challenging as this is all new to everyone. Flexibility has been key to staying positive and focused on the main goal of protecting our aircraft for the return of our great company to full operational status,” said Joe Mooney, a line aircraft mechanic at Hawaiian. “The maintenance of our planes has continued as we transition to putting them to bed, so to speak. They are resting for the big awakening which will hopefully come sooner rather than later. I have no doubt that our team at Hawaiian Airlines will roar back to full operations soon and continue our honored tradition of sharing Hawai‘i with the world.”

*An FAA requirement that requires us to check each aircraft every 48 hours regardless of flight hours logged.

Hawaiian Airlines March and first quarter 2020 traffic statistics reflect effects of COVID-19

Hawaiian has issued this report on the affects of the coronavirus crisis:

Hawaiian Airlines, Inc., a subsidiary of Hawaiian Holdings, Inc., saw sharp declines in its system-wide traffic statistics in March 2020 as government mandated restrictions on travel in response to the COVID-19 pandemic became more numerous.

Demand declines that began with U.S. government restrictions on Chinese arrivals in late January accelerated in mid-March, when governments in Australia, New Zealand, Tahiti, American Samoa and Hawai’i instituted requirements of self-isolation or quarantine for incoming arrivals. Hawaiian Airlines has responded to the diminishing demand by reducing its scheduled service systemwide by 95 percent through April 2020.

The table below summarizes March and year-to-date statistics compared to the respective prior-year periods. In light of Hawaiian’s substantially reduced schedule in April and likelihood of similar reductions in May, Hawaiian emphasized that the results shown below should not be construed as indicative of future results.

SYSTEM-WIDE OPERATIONS1

MARCH

2020

2019

% CHANGE

PAX

542,456

993,548

(45.4)%

RPMs (000)

851,022

1,439,227

(40.9)%

ASMs (000)

1,466,774

1,665,067

(11.9)%

LF

58.0%

86.4%

(28.4) pts

YEAR-TO-DATE

2020

2019

% CHANGE

PAX

2,362,196

2,822,634

(16.3)%

RPMs (000)

3,714,773

4,128,485

(10.0)%

ASMs (000)

4,979,529

4,851,921

2.6%

LF

74.6%

85.1%

(10.5) pts

PAX

Passengers transported

RPM

Revenue Passenger Mile; one paying passenger transported one mile

ASM

Available Seat Mile; one seat transported one mile

LF

Load Factor; percentage of seating capacity filled

1Includes the operations of contract carriers under capacity purchase agreements.

Ever wondered how our cargo business got started? When Honolulu experienced a shortage of meat in 1942, Fagan Ranch on Molokaʻi decided it would ship its cattle meat to Honolulu in our Sikorsky S-38 plane, along with anything else that needed to be hauled. This gave airline officials the idea of operating an air-freight service to the outer islands. Thus, on March 20, 1942, Hawaiian Airlines became the first airline in the nation to receive a U.S. air cargo certificate.

Photo: Hawaiian Airlines.

Hawaiian aircraft photo gallery:

 

Hawaii’s mandatory quarantine forces Hawaiian Airlines to park aircraft

Hawaiian Airlines issued this update:

Hawaiian Airlines is reducing its April flight schedule due to the COVID-19 pandemic with a commitment to continue offering its guests and cargo customers essential service within the Hawaiian Islands and between Hawai‘i and California and the U.S. territory of American Samoa.

The airline will maintain a reduced but still robust schedule of Neighbor Island flights, while bolstering all-cargo service to ensure goods continue to reach communities statewide.

“As Hawai‘i’s airline, we understand that our operation is essential to the state. We serve both guests who rely on us for important travel and the transportation of critical cargo,” said Hawaiian Airlines President and CEO Peter Ingram. “This has been the hallmark of our mission for 90 years and our dedication to our guests remains unchanged as we look to overcome this global crisis together.”

Starting Sunday, Hawaiian’s long-haul transpacific network will consist of one daily nonstop flight between Honolulu (HNL) and Los Angeles (LAX) and San Francisco (SFO), and one weekly flight connecting Hawai‘i to its Pacific island neighbor of Pago Pago, American Samoa (PPG). All routes will be operated with wide-body Airbus A330 aircraft.

The California routes present cargo opportunities to help maintain service for shippers affected by the reduction in passenger flights due to the state of Hawai‘i’s mandatory 14-day quarantine for overseas arrivals in an effort to prevent the spread of COVID-19. The HNL-PPG route maintains vital service for the territory of American Samoa.

Guests traveling on Hawaiian’s Neighbor Island network will continue to enjoy convenient options throughout the day with 41 daily roundtrip flights scheduled for April. From Honolulu there will be 38 daily flights, including 13 to Maui, eight to Kona, seven to Kaua‘i, six to Hilo, and two each to Lāna‘i and Moloka‘i. From Maui there will be one roundtrip each to Hilo, Kaua‘i and Kona in addition to Honolulu service.

Hawaiian’s schedule reductions for April resulted from the state of Hawai‘i’s quarantine entry restriction and the ensuing drop off of travel to and from the islands. Hawaiian is operating its regularly scheduled long-haul flights through today before it begins suspending routes tomorrow.

Meanwhile, Hawaiian has expanded interisland cargo service to facilitate the movement of essential goods ranging from food to medical equipment and machinery.

On March 3, a fleet of all-cargo ATR 72 aircraft operated by ‘Ohana by Hawaiian began offering flights five days a week between Honolulu and Kahului (OGG) on Maui and Kona (KOA) on the western coast of the Island of Hawai‘i. The new routes add to all-cargo service launched in summer of 2018 between HNL and Līhu‘e (LIH) on Kaua‘i and Hilo (ITO) on the eastern coast of the Island of Hawai‘i.

Hawaiian also utilizes its Boeing 717 passenger fleet to carry critical, time-sensitive cargo like pharmaceuticals and Blood Bank of Hawai‘i shipments.

Hawaiian is still experiencing an unprecedented volume of calls from guests and respectfully asks that only those with immediate travel needs contact the airline for assistance. Options to reach Hawaiian’s reservations team, to make online changes to tickets, and to see a list of travel waivers are available at  Hawaiian’s COVID-19 hub.

The airline also explains how it is keeping employees and guests safe by disinfecting aircraft and airport spaces, modifying boarding processes to prevent congestion at the gate, and adjusting in-flight services such as by distributing disposable sanitizing wipes.

Copyright Photos: Elway Kibota. Hawaiian began to park planes around Honolulu International Airport (HNL). The Airbus A330s are currently occupying runway 8L (top) and the Airbus A321neos on taxiway Foxtrot (below).

Hawaiian Airlines suspends most long-haul passenger service due to new state of Hawai‘i quarantine order

Hawaiian Airlines has made this announcement:

Hawaiian Airlines, in preparation for a 14-day government quarantine order for all Hawai‘i arrivals set to begin Thursday due to the COVID-19 pandemic, has announced it will maintain its regular flight schedule through Wednesday, March 25, to allow guests to return home and to accommodate the repatriation of aircraft before finalizing significant reductions of its domestic and international passenger network.

The airline, which has begun notifying guests about the quarantine rule, has restricted passenger bookings on its network while it finalizes its April schedule. Hawaiian is committed to providing one daily nonstop flight between Honolulu (HNL) and Los Angeles (LAX) and its Thursday flight between HNL and American Samoa (PPG) in order to provide a baseline of out-of-state access. The airline will evaluate its transpacific cargo network and may provide passenger access on any additional flights for travelers willing to undergo the mandated self-imposed quarantine.

Hawaiian will also be reducing its Neighbor Island schedule – starting with the suspension of ‘Ohana by Hawaiian service between Honolulu and Kapalua in West Maui effective Wednesday – but intends to maintain a network that will continue to provide vital connectivity for guests traveling within the state. Interisland cargo service will continue uninterrupted using Boeing 717 jets and a turboprop fleet operated by ‘Ohana by Hawaiian.

Hawaiian Airlines aircraft photo gallery:

Hawaiian to cut frequencies to Tokyo Haneda

Hawaiian Airlines has announced it would adjust flight frequencies between Hawai‘i and Tokyo’s Haneda Airport (HND) at the end of March due to slowing travel demand attributed to the COVID-19 virus.

Effective March 28 through April 29, the airline will temporarily suspend flights that operate three-times-weekly between Kona International Airport (KOA) on the Island of Hawai‘i and HND, and four-times-weekly between Honolulu’s Daniel K. Inouye International Airport (HNL) and HND. At the same time, Hawaiian will launch an additional daily nonstop service between HNL and HND as announced in November of last year.


“Japan is a vitally important market for our airline, and we have been looking forward to launching our third nonstop flight between Honolulu and Haneda, which offers more convenient connecting times for our guests,” said Peter Ingram, president and CEO at Hawaiian Airlines. “Unfortunately, the spread of COVID-19 beyond Asia has diminished near-term global travel demand, so we are balancing some of our Haneda capacity by suspending for about a month our hybrid service between Haneda and Honolulu and Kona.”

Below are the last flights scheduled to operate prior to the suspension (all times local):

FLIGHT ROUTE DEPARTS ARRIVES SERVICE ENDS SERVICE RESUMES
HA851 KOA-HND 5:15 p.m. 10 p.m. (+1) March 27 May 1
HA852 HND-KOA 11:55 p.m. 12:05 p.m. March 27 May 1
HA855 HNL-HND 5:20 p.m. 10 p.m. (+1) March 26 April 30
HA856 HND-HNL 11:55 p.m. 11:55 a.m. March 28 May 2

The new Honolulu-Haneda frequency begins with the inaugural flight on March 28. HA863 will depart HNL at 12:30 p.m., with a scheduled 5:10 p.m. arrival at HND the following day. The return flight, HA864, will depart HND at 8:15 p.m. and arrive at HNL at 8:10 a.m. the same day, giving guests ample time to enjoy their first day on O‘ahu or connect to neighboring Hawaiian Islands.

Once the changes take place, Hawaiian’s Japan-Hawai‘i network of 35 weekly flights will include three daily nonstop flights connecting Honolulu and Tokyo: two flights serving HND and one flight serving Narita International Airport (NRT). The airline also offers daily service between Honolulu and Osaka’s Kansai International Airport (KIX), four weekly flights between Honolulu and Fukuoka Airport (FUK), and three weekly flights between Honolulu and Sapporo’s New Chitose Airport (CTS).

Upon restoring the suspended Haneda flights, Hawaiian will operate 42 weekly flights between Japan and Hawai‘i.

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