Tag Archives: Boeing

Boeing licenses Ultraviolet Wand to Healthe, Inc. to counter COVID-19

Boeing entered into a patent and technology license with Florida-based Healthe® Inc. today under which Healthe will manufacture an ultraviolet (UV) wand designed to sanitize airplane interiors. Boeing designed and developed the UV wand as part of the company’s Confident Travel Initiative (CTI) to support customers and enhance the safety and well-being of passengers and crews during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“The UV wand is designed to be more effective than similar devices. It quickly disinfects surfaces on an airplane and further strengthens other layers of protection for passengers and crew,” said Mike Delaney, who leads Boeing’s CTI efforts. “Boeing spent six months transforming an idea for the wand into a working model, and Healthe will now take that prototype and make it available to the world at large.”

Healthe will produce and distribute the commercial wand, helping airlines and potentially others combat the coronavirus pandemic. The technology could be available for airlines in late fall. The device is an addition to sanitizing and protective measures already in place, which include the use of high-efficiency particulate air filters that trap more than 99.9% of particulates and prevent them from re-circulating back to the cabin.

“We are proud to be assisting Boeing as they work with their partner airlines to enhance in-cabin plane sanitization efforts. This could also benefit schools, hospitals, offices, wherever pathogens go,” said Abe Morris, Healthe executive chairman. “As we ramp up deployment of our cutting-edge UVC and Far-UVC 222 light solutions across many sectors, this new commercial-grade wand will be another powerful tool in the sanitization arsenal to protect passengers against the spread of harmful viruses.”

The UV wand uses 222 nanometer UVC light. Research indicates 222 nanometer UVC inactivates pathogens effectively.

Using the self-contained apparatus that resembles a carry-on suitcase, crews can pass UV light over high-touch surfaces, sanitizing everywhere the light reaches. The UV wand is particularly effective in compact spaces and sanitizes a flight deck in less than 15 minutes.

As part of CTI, Boeing solicited feedback from multiple industry sources, which aided in quickly validating this technology. Etihad Airways was the first to evaluate the device, and the UV wand was demonstrated on the Etihad 787-10 ecoDemonstrator airplane on Aug. 21.

The mission of Boeing’s Confident Travel Initiative is to be a leader in the global effort to provide passengers and crew a safe, healthy and efficient travel experience.

Boeing receives an order for two 737-800 Boeing Converted Freighters (BCF)

Boeing has made this announcement:

Boeing has announced a firm order from an unidentified customer for two 737-800 Boeing Converted Freighters (BCF), as well as agreements to open additional conversion lines in Guangzhou, China, and Singapore to meet strong market demand.

Based on the popular Next-Generation 737, the 737-800BCF offers operators newer technology, lower fuel consumption and higher reliability than other standard-body freighters. Primarily used to carry express cargo on domestic or short-haul routes, the airplane is capable of carrying up to 23.9 tons (52,800 pounds) and flying up to 2,000 nautical miles (3,750 kilometers).

The 737-800BCF now has 134 orders and commitments.

The new 737-800BCF line at Guangzhou Aircraft Maintenance Engineering Company Limited (GAMECO) is scheduled to open in early 2021, marking the MRO’s second conversion line for the market-leading 737-800BCF. To date, Boeing has delivered 36 737-800BCF to more than 10 operators across four continents.

Boeing will also add a second conversion line for its widebody converted freighter, the 767-300BCF, at ST Engineering’s facility in Singapore. The second line is scheduled to open later this year.

House Final Committee Report on the Boeing 737 MAX

Chair of the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure Peter DeFazio (D-OR) and Chair of the Subcommittee on Aviation Rick Larsen (D-WA) one September 16, 2020 released the Committee’s final report on the Boeing 737 MAX. This report, prepared by Majority Staff, lays out the serious flaws and missteps in the design, development, and certification of the aircraft, which entered commercial service in 2017 before suffering two deadly crashes within five months of each other that killed a total of 346 people, including eight Americans.

The Committee’s 238-page report, which points to repeated and serious failures by both The Boeing Company (Boeing) and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), contains five central themes and includes more than six dozen investigative findings. These themes include:

  • Production pressures that jeopardized the safety of the flying public. There was tremendous financial pressure on Boeing and the 737 MAX program to compete with Airbus’ new A320neo aircraft. Among other things, this pressure resulted in extensive efforts to cut costs, maintain the 737 MAX program schedule, and avoid slowing the 737 MAX production line.
  • Faulty Design and Performance Assumptions. Boeing made fundamentally faulty assumptions about critical technologies on the 737 MAX, most notably with MCAS, the software designed to automatically push the airplane’s nose down in certain conditions. Boeing also expected that pilots, who were largely unaware that MCAS existed, would be able to mitigate any potential malfunction.
  • Culture of Concealment. Boeing withheld crucial information from the FAA, its customers, and 737 MAX pilots, including internal test data that revealed it took a Boeing test pilot more than 10 seconds to diagnose and respond to uncommanded MCAS activation in a flight simulator, a condition the pilot described as “catastrophic.” Federal guidelines assume pilots will respond to this condition within four seconds.
  • Conflicted Representation. The FAA’s current oversight structure with respect to Boeing creates inherent conflicts of interest that have jeopardized the safety of the flying public. The report documents multiple instances in which Boeing employees who have been authorized to perform work on behalf of the FAA failed to alert the FAA to potential safety and/or certification issues.
  • Boeing’s Influence Over the FAA’s Oversight Structure. Multiple career FAA officials have documented examples where FAA management overruled a determination of the FAA’s own technical experts at the behest of Boeing. These examples are consistent with results of a recent draft FAA employee “safety culture” survey that showed many FAA employees believed its senior leaders are more concerned with helping industry achieve its goals and are not held accountable for safety-related decisions.

“Our report lays out disturbing revelations about how Boeing—under pressure to compete with Airbus and deliver profits for Wall Street—escaped scrutiny from the FAA, withheld critical information from pilots, and ultimately put planes into service that killed 346 innocent people. What’s particularly infuriating is how Boeing and FAA both gambled with public safety in the critical time period between the two crashes,” Chair DeFazio said. “On behalf of the families of the victims of both crashes, as well as anyone who steps on a plane expecting to arrive at their destination safely, we are making this report public to put a spotlight not only on the broken safety culture at Boeing but also the gaps in the regulatory system at the FAA that allowed this fatally-flawed plane into service. Critically, our report gives Congress a roadmap on the steps we must take to reinforce aviation safety and regulatory transparency, increase Federal oversight, and improve corporate accountability to help ensure the story of the Boeing 737 MAX is never, ever repeated.”

“The Committee’s thorough investigation uncovered errors that are difficult to hear, but necessary to confront about the 737 MAX certification,” Chair Larsen said. “This report, combined with the findings and recommendations from the Lion Air and Ethiopian Airlines investigations, National Transportation Safety Board, Joint Authorities Technical Review and other entities, serve as a roadmap for changes to the FAA certification process. The 346 victims of the two tragic crashes and their families, as well as the traveling public rightfully expect Congress to act. As the Committee moves into the next phase of oversight, I will continue to work with Chair DeFazio and my colleagues to address the significant cultural and structural deficiencies identified in the report in order to improve safety.”

Additional information:

At the direction of Chair DeFazio and Subcommittee Chair Larsen, the Committee launched an investigation into the design, development, and certification of the 737 MAX, and related issues, in March 2019, shortly after the second crash involving a Boeing 737 MAX aircraft. As part of the 18-month long investigation, the Committee held five public hearings with more than 20 witnesses; wrote nearly two dozen oversight letters, obtained an estimated 600,000 pages of documents from Boeing, the FAA, and others; received information and insight from former and current employees who contacted the Committee directly through the Committee’s whistleblower link; and interviewed dozens of current and former Boeing and FAA employees.

To access the Final Report, newly released accompanying records, including transcribed interviews of both senior Boeing and FAA officials about the 737 MAX, as well as past statements, hearing video, and more, click here.

Boeing Statement on the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee Report on 737 MAX

Boeing cooperated fully and extensively with the Committee’s inquiry since it began in early 2019. We have been hard at work strengthening our safety culture and rebuilding trust with our customers, regulators, and the flying public. The passengers and crew on board Lion Air Flight 610 and Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302, as well as their loved ones, continue to be in our thoughts and prayers.

Multiple committees, experts, and governmental authorities have examined issues related to the MAX, and we have incorporated many of their recommendations, as well as the results of our own internal reviews, into the 737 MAX and the overall airplane design process. The revised design of the MAX has received intensive internal and regulatory review, including more than 375,000 engineering and test hours and 1,300 test flights. Once the FAA and other regulators have determined the MAX can safely return to service, it will be one of the most thoroughly scrutinized aircraft in history, and we have full confidence in its safety. We have also taken steps to bolster safety across our company, consulting outside experts and learning from best practices in other industries. We have set up a new safety organization to enhance and standardize safety practices, restructured our engineering organization to give engineers a stronger voice and a more direct line to share concerns with top management, created a permanent Aerospace Safety Committee of our Board of Directors as well as expanded the role of the Safety Promotion Center.

We have learned many hard lessons as a company from the accidents of Lion Air Flight 610 and Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302, and from the mistakes we have made.  As this report recognizes, we have made fundamental changes to our company as a result, and continue to look for ways to improve. Change is always hard and requires daily commitment, but we as a company are dedicated to doing the work.

For more information on steps Boeing is taking to strengthen safety, visit our 2020 Proxy Statement and our 737 MAX Resources Page.

Boeing and Etihad Airways concluded testing on the ecoDemonstrator program

Boeing and Etihad Airways concluded testing on the aerospace company’s 2020 ecoDemonstrator program last week with a cross-country flight using a 50/50 blend of sustainable and traditional jet fuel.

Flying from Seattle to Boeing’s manufacturing site in South Carolina, Etihad’s newest 787-10 Dreamliner used the maximum sustainable fuel blend permitted for commercial aviation. The transcontinental flight also demonstrated a new way for pilots, air traffic controllers and airline operations centers to communicate simultaneously and optimize routing.

Boeing’s ecoDemonstrator program takes promising technologies out of the lab and tests them in the air to accelerate innovation. This year’s program evaluated four projects to reduce emissions and noise and enhance the safety and health of passengers and crew. All of the 787-10 test flights used a blend of traditional jet fuel and sustainable fuel produced from inedible agricultural wastes to minimize emissions, with the final flight operating at the maximum 50/50 commercial blend.

The fuel from World Energy and supplied to Boeing by EPIC Fuels has been certified by the Roundtable on Sustainable Biomaterials to reduce carbon emissions by more than 75% over the fuel’s life cycle.

The partnership between Boeing and Etihad Airways represents a longstanding collaboration to make flying more sustainable. The two companies were among the founding partners that created the Sustainable Bioenergy Research Consortium in 2010. Based at Khalifa University near Abu Dhabi, the pilot project for a unique desert ecosystem produces sustainable fuel from plants that grow in the desert, irrigated by coastal seawater. Etihad used the initial batch of fuel from the pilot project in January 2019 on a passenger flight from Abu Dhabi to Amsterdam.

In January 2020, Etihad took delivery of its signature green 787-10 using a fuel mix comprising 30% SAF produced by World Energy.

Boeing has been a leader in industry efforts to develop sustainable aviation fuel since before the first test flight on a commercial airliner in 2008. Along with others in the industry, the company worked to gain certification of sustainable fuel for commercial use in 2011 and collaborates around the world to create regional production roadmaps.

For more than a decade, World Energy and EPIC Fuels have produced and supplied SAF to Boeing for flight testing. Boeing offers airlines the option of using sustainable fuel for their airplane delivery flights. The first of these occurred in 2012 with an Etihad 777-300ER delivery flight from Everett, Washington, to Abu Dhabi.

Photo: Boeing.

 

Reuters: Boeing finds a new 787 Dreamliner production problem

From Reuters:

“Boeing Company warned on Tuesday of delays in deliveries of its 787 Dreamliner, as three separate production flaws over the past year hamper efforts to develop an alternative cash cow to its grounded 737 MAX.

In the latest issue, Boeing learned during fabrication of the 787 horizontal stabilizer that some components were clamped with greater force than specified, which could result in improper gap verification and shimming. Boeing identified the problem in February and announced it on Tuesday.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) said Tuesday it “is investigating manufacturing flaws affecting certain Boeing 787 jetliners. The agency continues to engage with Boeing.”

Boeing to ground 8 787 Dreamliners due to manufacturing problems

Boeing issued this short statement:

“Boeing has identified two distinct manufacturing issues in the join of certain 787 aftbody fuselage sections, which, in combination, result in a condition that does not meet our design standards,”

Eight of the 787 Dreamliners will be grounded for inspection and repair of how parts of the fuselage were joined together.

Reuters: FAA proposes requiring key Boeing 737 MAX design changes

From Reuters:

“The Federal Aviation Administration said on Monday it is proposing requiring four key Boeing 737 MAX design changes to address safety issues seen in two crashes that killed 346 people and led to the plane’s grounding in March 2019.

The agency is issuing a proposed airworthiness directive to require updated flight-control software, revised display-processing software to generate alerts, revising certain flight-crew operating procedures, and changing the routing of some wiring bundles.”

Read the full report.

Boeing CEO updates employees on quarterly results and market realities

Boeing President and CEO Dave Calhoun issued the following letter to employees today addressing aerospace market realities:

Team,

These past few months have been unlike anything we’ve seen. The pandemic’s effect on our communities and industry is ongoing. And the challenges we face as a company are still unfolding.

As cases continue to rise in areas around the globe, health and safety remain a top priority. My thanks go to everyone who is supporting our safety efforts, wearing face coverings and upholding our shared accountability for keeping one another safe. All those affected directly by COVID-19 also have my sympathies.

The reality is the pandemic’s impact on the aviation sector continues to be severe. Though some fliers are returning slowly to the air, their numbers remain far lower than 2019, with airline revenues likewise reduced. This pressure on our commercial customers means they are delaying jet purchases, slowing deliveries, deferring elective maintenance, retiring older aircraft and reducing spend — all of which affects our business and, ultimately, our bottom line. While there have been some encouraging signs, we estimate it will take around three years to return to 2019 passenger levels.

That’s why we’ve been taking decisive actions. To bolster our near-term liquidity, we suspended our dividend, terminated our share repurchasing program, reduced discretionary spending and overhead costs, and issued $25 billion in new debt.

While these steps help us navigate the pandemic, they don’t change the fact that the commercial marketplace is different, and we must change with it. To align to a smaller market, we lowered commercial production rates and took tough workforce actions throughout the quarter.

Unfortunately, it’s become clear that we need to make further adjustments based on the prolonged impact of COVID-19.

The changes include further lowering our commercial airplane production rates:

– We will have a slower ramp-up in 737 production than previously planned, with a gradual increase to 31 per month by the beginning of 2022.

– We will reduce the combined 777/777X production rate to two per month in 2021, which is one unit lower per month than we announced last quarter.

– We will further reduce 787 production to six per month in 2021. This is an adjustment down from the reduction we announced last quarter to 10 per month currently and seven per month by 2022. With this lower rate profile, we will also need to evaluate the most efficient way to produce the 787, including studying the feasibility of consolidating production in one location. We will share more with you following our study.

– While our 767 and 747 rates remain unchanged, in light of the current market dynamics and outlook, we’ll complete production of the iconic 747 in 2022. Our customer commitment does not end at delivery, and we’ll continue to support 747 operations and sustainment well into the future.

The work you’ve done on these programs has been tremendous. I have been impressed during every visit to our production facilities. These production rate changes are not a reflection on your work or our capability. The market simply won’t support higher output levels at this time, and we need to adapt accordingly.

As you know, we previously announced a net 10% workforce reduction in 2020 through a combination of voluntary layoffs, attrition and involuntary layoffs (ILOs) to align to a smaller market. The first wave of associates affected by ILOs received notification in May, and we continue to conduct smaller, phased workforce reductions to reach this target. Managers are communicating the latest wave of those reductions beginning today.

Regretfully, the prolonged impact of COVID-19 causing further reductions in our production rates and lower demand for commercial services means we’ll have to further assess the size of our workforce. This is difficult news, and I know it adds uncertainty during an already challenging time. We will try to limit the impact on our people as much as possible going forward. And as always, we will communicate openly, honestly and transparently with you.

The diversity of our portfolio and our government services, defense and space programs provide some stability in the near term as we take these tough but necessary steps. And we’ll continue working to meet our commitments and deliver on our priorities.

As we look to the future, we also are focused on not just adapting and recovering but also emerging stronger and more resilient. That includes proactively reviewing every aspect of our company to identify opportunities to improve, align to our new market and strengthen our culture. We are looking holistically at our infrastructure footprint, our overhead and organizational structure, our portfolio and investments, our supply chain health and stability, and our ability to drive operational excellence and a keen focus on safety in everything we do.

And while we’re facing challenges, it’s important to remember the good work and innovation underway across our company. This is absolutely necessary for our future. Aerospace has always proven to be resilient — and so has Boeing.

Thank you for facing these challenges with me. I could not ask for a better team.

Dave

Boeing reports a large second quarter loss

Boeing released this second quarter statement:

  • Financial results continue to be significantly impacted by COVID-19 and the 737 MAX grounding
  • Revenue of $11.8 billion, GAAP loss per share of ($4.20) and core (non-GAAP)* loss per share of ($4.79)
  • Operating cash flow of ($5.3) billion; cash and marketable securities of $32.4 billion
  • Total backlog of $409 billion, including more than 4,500 commercial airplanes

 

Table 1. Summary Financial Results

Second Quarter

First Half

(Dollars in Millions, except per share data)

2020

2019

Change

2020

2019

Change

Revenues

$11,807

$15,751

(25)%

$28,715

$38,668

(26)%

GAAP

Loss From Operations

($2,964)

($3,380)

NM

($4,317)

($1,030)

NM

Operating Margin

(25.1)%

(21.5)%

NM

(15.0)%

(2.7)%

NM

Net Loss

($2,395)

($2,942)

NM

($3,036)

($793)

NM

Loss Per Share

($4.20)

($5.21)

NM

($5.31)

($1.40)

NM

Operating Cash Flow

($5,280)

($590)

NM

($9,582)

$2,198

NM

Non-GAAP*

Core Operating Loss

($3,319)

($3,745)

NM

($5,019)

($1,759)

NM

Core Operating Margin

(28.1)%

(23.8)%

NM

(17.5)%

(4.5)%

NM

Core Loss Per Share

($4.79)

($5.82)

NM

($6.49)

($2.60)

NM

*Non-GAAP measure; complete definitions of Boeing’s non-GAAP measures are on page 6, “Non-GAAP Measures Disclosures.”    

The Boeing Company reported second-quarter revenue of $11.8 billion, GAAP loss per share of ($4.20) and core loss per share (non-GAAP)* of ($4.79), primarily reflecting the impacts of COVID-19 and the 737 MAX grounding (Table 1). Boeing recorded operating cash flow of ($5.3) billion.

“We remained focused on the health of our employees and communities while proactively taking action to navigate the unprecedented commercial market impacts from the COVID-19 pandemic,” said Boeing President and Chief Executive Officer Dave Calhoun. “We’re working closely with our customers, suppliers and global partners to manage the challenges to our industry, bridge to recovery and rebuild to be stronger on the other side.”

In the second quarter, Boeing restarted production operations across key sites following temporary pauses to protect its workforce and introduce rigorous new health and safety procedures. Despite the challenges, Boeing continued to deliver across key commercial, defense, space and services programs. The company also resumed early stages of production on the 737 program with a focus on safety, quality and operational excellence. Following the lead of global regulators, Boeing made steady progress toward the safe return to service of the 737, including completion of FAA certification flight tests.

To align to the sharp reduction in commercial market demand in light of COVID-19, the company is taking several actions including further adjusting commercial airplane production rates and reducing employment levels.

“The diversity of our balanced portfolio and our government services, defense and space programs provide some critical stability for us in the near-term as we take tough but necessary steps to adapt for new market realities,” Calhoun said. “We are taking the right action to ensure we’re well positioned for the future by strengthening our culture, improving transparency, rebuilding trust and transforming our business to become a better, more sustainable Boeing. Air travel has always proven to be resilient – and so has Boeing.”

Table 2. Cash Flow

Second Quarter

First Half

(Millions)

2020

2019

2020

2019

Operating Cash Flow

($5,280)

($590)

($9,582)

$2,198

Less Additions to Property, Plant & Equipment

($348)

($421)

($776)

($922)

Free Cash Flow*

($5,628)

($1,011)

($10,358)

$1,276

*Non-GAAP measure; complete definitions of Boeing’s non-GAAP measures are on page 6, “Non-GAAP Measures Disclosures.”    

Operating cash flow was ($5.3) billion in the quarter, primarily reflecting lower commercial deliveries and services volume due to COVID-19 and the 737 MAX grounding, as well as timing of receipts and expenditures (Table 2).

Table 3. Cash, Marketable Securities and Debt Balances

Quarter-End

(Billions)

Q2 20

Q1 20

Cash

$20.0

$15.0

Marketable Securities1

$12.4

$0.5

Total

$32.4

$15.5

Debt Balances:

The Boeing Company, net of intercompany loans to BCC

$59.5

$36.9

Boeing Capital, including intercompany loans

$1.9

$2.0

Total Consolidated Debt

$61.4

$38.9

1 Marketable securities consists primarily of time deposits due within one year classified as “short-term investments.”

Cash and investments in marketable securities increased to $32.4 billion, compared to $15.5 billion at the beginning of the quarter, driven by the issuance of new debt (Table 3). Debt was $61.4 billion, up from $38.9 billion at the beginning of the quarter due to the issuance of new debt, partially offset by repayment of maturing debt.

Total company backlog at quarter-end was $409 billion.

Segment Results

Commercial Airplanes

Table 4. Commercial Airplanes

Second Quarter

First Half

(Dollars in Millions)

2020

2019

Change

2020

2019

Change

Commercial Airplanes Deliveries

20

90

(78)%

70

239

(71)%

Revenues

$1,633

$4,722

(65)%

$7,838

$16,544

(53)%

Loss from Operations

($2,762)

($4,946)

NM

($4,830)

($3,773)

NM

Operating Margin

(169.1)%

(104.7)%

NM

(61.6)%

(22.8)%

NM

Commercial Airplanes second-quarter revenue and operating margin decreased reflecting lower delivery volume, partially offset by a lower 737 MAX customer consideration charge of $551 million in the quarter compared to a $5.6 billion charge in the same period last year. Second-quarter operating margin was also negatively impacted by $712 million of abnormal production costs related to the 737 program, $468 million of severance expense and $133 million of abnormal production costs from the temporary suspension of operations in response to COVID-19.

The 737 program resumed early stages of production in May and expects to continue to produce at low rates for the remainder of 2020. The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly impacted air travel and reduced near-term demand, resulting in lower production and delivery rate assumptions. Commercial Airplanes expects to gradually increase the 737 production rate to 31 per month by the beginning of 2022, with further gradual increases to correspond with market demand. Estimated potential concessions and other considerations to customers related to the 737 MAX grounding increased by $551 million in the quarter. There was no material change to estimated abnormal production costs.

Commercial Airplanes has further updated its production rate assumptions this quarter to reflect impacts of COVID-19 on its demand outlook, and will continue to assess them on an ongoing basis. The 787 production rate will be reduced to 6 per month in 2021. The 777/777X combined production rate will be gradually reduced to 2 per month in 2021, with 777X first delivery targeted for 2022. At this time, production rate assumptions have not changed on the 767 and 747 programs.

Commercial Airplanes delivered 20 airplanes during the quarter, and backlog included over 4,500 airplanes valued at $326 billion.

Defense, Space & Security

Table 5. Defense, Space & Security

Second Quarter

First Half

(Dollars in Millions)

2020

2019

Change

2020

2019

Change

Revenues

$6,588

$6,579

$12,630

$13,166

(4)%

Earnings from Operations

$600

$975

(38)%

$409

$1,827

(78)%

Operating Margin

9.1%

14.8%

(5.7) Pts

3.2%

13.9%

(10.7) Pts

Defense, Space & Security second-quarter revenue was $6.6 billion, reflecting COVID-19 impact on derivative aircraft programs, partially offset by higher volume across the remainder of the portfolio (Table 5). Second-quarter operating margin decreased to 9.1 percent primarily due to a gain on sale of property in the second quarter of 2019 and a $151 million KC-46A Tanker charge primarily driven by additional fixed cost allocation resulting from lower commercial airplane production volume due to COVID-19.

During the quarter, Defense, Space & Security received an award for three additional MQ-25 unmanned aerial refueling aircraft for the U.S. Navy, as well as contracts for Cruise Missile Systems for the U.S. Navy and a contract for 24 AH-64E Apache helicopters for the Kingdom of Morocco. Defense, Space & Security completed Critical Design Review for the T-7A advanced trainer, achieved first flight and delivery of the F/A-18 U.S. Navy Block III Super Hornet, and achieved first flight of the F-15 Qatar Advanced aircraft. Defense, Space & Security also delivered the 100th U.S. Navy P-8A Poseidon, the 400th V-22 Osprey, and the 2,500th AH-64 Apache.

Backlog at Defense, Space & Security was $64 billion, of which 31 percent represents orders from customers outside the U.S.

Global Services

Table 6. Global Services

Second Quarter

First Half

(Dollars in Millions)

2020

2019

Change

2020

2019

Change

Revenues

$3,488

$4,543

(23)%

$8,116

$9,162

(11)%

(Loss)/Earnings from Operations

($672)

$687

NM

$36

$1,340

NM

Operating Margin

(19.3)%

15.1%

NM

0.4%

14.6%

NM

Global Services second-quarter revenue decreased to $3.5 billion, driven by lower commercial services volume due to COVID-19, partially offset by higher government services volume (Table 6). Second-quarter operating margin decreased to (19.3) percent primarily due to lower commercial services volume, less favorable mix of products and services, and $923 million of charges related to asset impairments and severance costs as a result of the COVID-19 market environment.

During the quarter, Global Services was awarded a contract modification for P-8A integrated logistics support for the U.S. Navy. Global Services captured an order for four 767-300 freighter conversions for DHL and was awarded a contract for F-15 pre-delivery training support for the Qatar Emiri Air Force. Global Services also delivered the first F/A-18 Super Hornet test aircraft modified for the U.S. Navy Blue Angels.

Additional Financial Information

Table 7. Additional Financial Information

Second Quarter

First Half

(Dollars in Millions)

2020

2019

2020

2019

Revenues

Boeing Capital

$69

$75

$134

$141

Unallocated items, eliminations and other

$29

($168)

($3)

($345)

Earnings from Operations

Boeing Capital

($7)

$37

$17

$57

FAS/CAS service cost adjustment

$355

$365

$702

$729

Other unallocated items and eliminations

($478)

($498)

($651)

($1,210)

Other income, net

$94

$107

$206

$213

Interest and debt expense

($553)

($154)

($815)

($277)

Effective tax rate

30.0%

14.2%

38.4%

27.5%

At quarter-end, Boeing Capital’s net portfolio balance was $2.1 billion. Revenue from other unallocated items and eliminations increased primarily due to reserves related to cost accounting litigation recorded in the second quarter of 2019. Interest and debt expense increased due to higher debt balances. The second quarter effective tax rate reflects tax benefits related to the 5 year net operating loss carryback provision in the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act as well as the impact of pre-tax losses.

Boeing and Etihad broaden sustainability alliance by testing innovations on ecoDemonstrator 787

Boeing and Etihad Airways will use a 787-10 Dreamliner to test ways to reduce emissions and noise as part of the aerospace company’s ecoDemonstrator program before the airline accepts delivery of the airplane this fall. The collaboration, which includes extensive sound measurement testing with industry partners, builds on a strategic sustainability alliance Boeing and Etihad formed in November 2019.

 

The ecoDemonstrator program utilizes commercial aircraft to test technologies that can make aviation safer and more sustainable now and into the future. The 2020 program, which will begin testing in August, is the first to use a Boeing 787-10.

Boeing and Etihad will work with industry-leading partners, including NASA and Safran Landing Systems, to conduct aircraft noise measurements from sensors on the airplane and the ground. The data will be used to validate aircraft noise prediction processes and the sound reduction potential of aircraft designs, including landing gear, that are modified for quieter operations.

In addition, a flight will be conducted during which pilots, air traffic controllers and an airline’s operations center will simultaneously share digital information to optimize routing efficiency and enhance safety by reducing workload and radio frequency congestion.

Test flights will be flown on a blend of sustainable fuel, which significantly lowers aviation’s environmental footprint. The testing program is expected to last about four weeks before Etihad enters its Boeing 787-10 into service.