Tag Archives: Delta Air Lines

Airbus delivers its first U.S.-assembled A220 from Mobile, Alabama

Airbus has delivered its first U.S.-assembled A220 aircraft from Mobile, Alabama, underlining the aircraft manufacturer’s role as a global aircraft producer and heralding the arrival of a new era in Airbus aircraft production in the United States. The aircraft was delivered to Delta Air Lines.

“The delivery of the first U.S.-built A220-300 is a historic moment that highlights Airbus’ growing industrial footprint in North America and makes us all extremely proud,” said C. Jeffrey Knittel, Chairman & CEO Airbus Americas, Inc. “We look forward to seeing passengers delighted by the experience of travelling on board this brand new A220-300 proudly built in Mobile, Alabama.”

Several milestones led up to this historic moment. From the groundbreaking of the Mobile A220 Final Assembly Line in January 2019, through the official start of A220 production in August 2019, and the inaugural flight of this aircraft in June, the A220 teams in Mirabel (Quebec) and Mobile worked closely together to make the A220 production in the U.S. a success.

To date, approximately 400 U.S. employees have been trained on A220 production – some in Mirabel, Quebec, Canada, where the A220 program and primary final assembly line are located. A year ago, the first U.S. based A220 production team, comprised of experienced and new team members, began assembling A220s in Mobile.

Delta Air Lines is currently the largest A220 customer, with a total of 95 A220 aircraft on order, and will be the first A220 operator in the Americas to be operating both A220-100 and A220-300 aircraft types.

As of end September 2020, 123 A220s have been delivered to seven operators and are being flown on routes in Asia, America, Europe and Africa, proving the great versatility of Airbus’ latest family member.

Delta Air Lines announces third quarter financial results, announces fleet retirements

Delta Air Lines today reported financial results for the September quarter 2020.  Detailed results, including both GAAP and adjusted metrics, are on page four and are incorporated here.

“While our September quarter results demonstrate the magnitude of the pandemic on our business, we have been  encouraged as more customers travel and we are seeing a path of progressive improvement in our revenues, financial results and daily cash burn,” said Ed Bastian, Delta’s chief executive officer.  “The actions we are taking now to take care of our people, simplify our fleet, improve the customer experience, and strengthen our brand will allow Delta to accelerate into a post-COVID recovery.”

September Quarter Financial Results 

  • Adjusted pre-tax loss of $2.6 billion excludes $4.0 billion of items directly related to the impact of COVID-19 and the company’s response, including fleet-related restructuring charges and charges for voluntary separation and early retirement programs for Delta employees, which were partially offset by the benefit of the CARES Act grant recognized in the quarter
  • Total adjusted revenue of $2.6 billion declined 79 percent on 63 percent lower capacity versus prior year
  • Total operating expense, which includes the $4.0 billion of COVID-related items described above, decreased $1.0 billion over prior year.  Adjusted for those items and third-party refinery sales, total operating expense decreased $5.5 billion or 52 percent in the September quarter compared to the prior year, driven by lower capacity- and revenue-related expenses and strong cost management in the business
  • At the end of the September quarter, the company had $21.6 billion in liquidity
  • During the September quarter cash burn (see Note A) averaged $24 million per day, and $18 million per day for the month of September

Revenue Environment

Delta’s adjusted operating revenue of $2.6 billion for the September quarter was down 79 percent versus the September 2019 quarter as demand for air travel remains under significant pressure.  Passenger revenues declined 83 percent on 63 percent lower capacity.  Non-ticket revenue streams have performed relatively better than passenger revenues, with total loyalty revenues declining 60 percent and cargo declining 25 percent.

“With a slow and steady build in demand, we are restoring flying to meet our customers’ needs, while staying nimble with our capacity in light of COVID-19,” said Glen Hauenstein, Delta’s president.  “While it may be two years or more until we see a normalized revenue environment, by restoring customer confidence in travel and building customer loyalty now, we are creating the foundation for sustainable future revenue growth.”

Setting the Foundation for Recovery

Delta has taken a number of actions to position the company to accelerate into a post-COVID recovery:

Taking great care of Delta people

  • Through the voluntary separation and early retirement programs, voluntary unpaid leaves, job sharing and other initiatives, the company has been able to avoid involuntary furloughs for ground and flight attendant employees
  • Launching a “Stop the Spread. Save Lives.” campaign to emphasize the six core health actions that protect Delta employees against COVID-19, including wearing masks, social distancing, testing and getting a flu shot. Delta is providing no-cost COVID-19 testing and flu shots for its U.S. employees

Improving the customer experience

  • Emphasizing health and safety with the Delta CareStandard, a multi-layered approach that includes intense cleaning protocols, blocking middle seats and requiring masks onboard all aircraft
  • Reducing complexity for customers by eliminating change fees for nearly all domestic fares and redeposit/reissuance fees on domestic reward tickets for SkyMiles Members
  • Taking a customer-centric approach to refunds, with approximately $2.8 billion returned to customers year-to-date

Simplifying the fleet

  • Restructuring its Airbus and CRJ aircraft order books to better match the timing of aircraft deliveries with network and financial needs over the next several years. The restructuring reduces aircraft purchase commitments by more than $2 billion in 2020 and by more than $5 billion through 2022
  • Accelerating its fleet simplification strategy, which is intended to modernize and streamline the company’s fleet, enhance the customer experience and generate cost savings. The company has announced plans to accelerate retirements of nearly 400 aircraft by 2025, including more than 200 in 2020

 

Fleet Type

Number of
Aircraft

Estimated Final Retirement
During the Quarter Ended

MD-90

26

June 2020

767-300ER

7

June 2020

A320

10

June 2020

MD-88

47

June 2020

737-700

10

September 2020

777

18

December 2020

CRJ200

125

December 2023

717

91

December 2025

767-300ER

49

December 2025

Total

383

Cost Performance

Total adjusted operating expense for the September quarter decreased $5.5 billion or 52 percent versus the prior year quarter excluding $3.1 billion in charges related to the voluntary separation and early retirement programs for employees, $2.2 billion in restructuring charges from fleet-related decisions, and a $1.3 billion CARES Act benefit.  This performance was driven by a $1.8 billion or 78 percent reduction in fuel expense, a 75 percent reduction in maintenance expense from parking or retiring nearly 40 percent of mainline aircraft and lower volume- and revenue-related expenses.  Salaries and benefits expense was down 32 percent as a result of approximately 18,000 employees electing to depart the company in addition to benefits from voluntary unpaid leaves, work hour reductions and other initiatives.

Non-operating expense for the quarter was $349 million higher versus the prior year quarter, driven primarily by $221 million in higher interest expense from increased debt levels the company has incurred during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Our results this quarter were underpinned by a strong focus on costs, as we reduced adjusted operating expenses by more than 50 percent, similar to the June quarter, despite flying 23 points more capacity,” said Paul Jacobson, Delta’s chief financial officer.  “That cost focus allowed the increase we’ve seen in net sales to flow directly into an improvement in our daily cash burn, which improved from $27 million per day in June to $18 million per day in September.”

Balance Sheet, Cash and Liquidity

Delta ended the September quarter with $21.6 billion in liquidity.  Cash used in operations during the quarter was $2.6 billion.  Daily cash burn averaged $24 million for the quarter, with an average of $18 million for the month of September.

At the end of the September quarter, the company had total debt and finance lease obligations of $34.9 billion with adjusted net debt of $17.0 billion, $6.5 billion higher than December 31, 2019.  In September, Delta completed the largest debt offering in aviation history, raising $9.0 billion at a blended average rate of 4.75 percent secured by its SkyMiles loyalty program.  In addition, the company borrowed $1.5 billion at a blended yield of 4.4 percent in connection with the issuance of tax-exempt bonds, that will be used to finance the LaGuardia airport project.  The company’s total debt had a weighted average interest rate of 4.3 percent at September 30, 2020.

Subsequent to the end of the quarter, the company repaid the $3 billion, 364-day term loan that it entered into in March, increasing its unencumbered asset base to $9 to $10 billion of aircraft, engines and spare parts and reducing remaining debt amortization and maturities to $2.3 billion through the end of 2021.  The company also repaid $2.6 billion under its revolving credit facilities drawn down in March 2020.

At the end of the September quarter, the company’s Air Traffic Liability stood at $4.6 billion, including a current liability of $4.4 billion and a non-current liability of $0.2 billion.  The non-current liability represents the current estimate of tickets to be flown, as well as credits to be used, beyond one year.  Travel credits represent approximately 60 percent of the Air Traffic Liability at the end of the September quarter.

CARES Act Accounting, Fleet Restructuring and Voluntary Separation and Early Retirement Program Charges

In the September quarter, the company received $701 million under the payroll support program (PSP) of the CARES Act, consisting of $491 million in additional grant funds and a $210 million increase in the low-interest, unsecured 10-year loan.  The September quarter amount includes an incremental $157 million beyond the initial $5.4 billion Delta was allocated in April 2020.  In the September quarter, approximately $1.3 billion of the grant was recognized as a contra-expense, which is reflected as “CARES Act grant recognition” on the Consolidated Statements of Operations.  The company expects to use the remaining proceeds from the PSP by the end of 2020.

During the September quarter, the company made the decision to retire its 717-200 fleet and the remainder of its 767-300ER fleet by 2025 and its CRJ-200 fleet by 2023.  As a result of these decisions, the company recorded $2.2 billion in fleet-related charges, which are reflected in “Restructuring charges” on the Consolidated Statement of Operations.

The company offered voluntary separation and early retirement programs to employees during the September quarter.  Approximately 18,000 employees participated in the programs, with most leaving the company August 1, resulting in a $3.1 billion restructuring charge in the September quarter, which is reflected in “Restructuring charges” on the Consolidated Statement of Operations.  Cash payments in connection with these programs totaled $813 million in the September quarter, and these payments are excluded from daily cash burn figures.  The company anticipates an additional $150 to $250 million in cash payments in the December quarter, $600 million in 2021 and the remaining payments in 2022 and beyond.

September Quarter Results

September quarter results have been adjusted primarily for the CARES Act grant recognition and restructuring charges described above.

GAAP

$
Change

%
Change

($ in millions except per share and unit costs)

3Q20

3Q19

Pre-tax (loss)/income

(6,859)

1,947

(8,806)

NM

Net (loss)/income

(5,379)

1,495

(6,874)

NM

Diluted (loss)/earnings per share

(8.47)

2.31

(10.78)

NM

Operating revenue

3,062

12,560

(9,498)

(76)

%

Operating expense

9,448

10,489

(1,041)

(10)

%

Fuel expense

486

2,239

(1,753)

(78)

%

Non-operating expense

473

124

349

NM

Total debt and finance lease obligations

34,870

10,119

24,751

NM

Total revenue per available seat mile (TRASM)

10.82

16.58

(5.76)

(35)

%

Consolidated unit cost (CASM)

33.40

13.85

19.55

NM

Average fuel price per gallon

1.25

1.94

(0.69)

(36)

%

Adjusted

$
Change

%
Change

($ in millions except per share and unit costs)

3Q20

3Q19

Pre-tax (loss)/income

(2,589)

1,968

(4,557)

NM

Net (loss)/income

(2,096)

1,507

(3,603)

NM

Diluted (loss)/earnings per share

(3.30)

2.33

(5.63)

NM

Operating revenue

2,645

12,507

(9,861)

(79)

%

Operating expense

5,004

10,460

(5,455)

(52)

%

Fuel expense

489

2,257

(1,768)

(78)

%

Non-operating expense

230

79

151

NM

Adjusted net debt

17,012

10,265

6,747

66

%

Total revenue per available seat mile (TRASM, adjusted)

9.35

16.51

(7.16)

(43)

%

Consolidated unit cost (CASM-Ex)

15.96

10.15

5.81

57

%

Average fuel price per gallon

1.25

1.96

(0.71)

(36)

%

About Delta Air Lines  Delta Air Lines (NYSE: DAL) is the U.S. global airline leader in safety, innovation, reliability and customer experience. Powered by our employees around the world, Delta has for a decade led the airline industry in operational excellence while maintaining our reputation for award-winning customer service.

Today, and always, nothing is more important than the health and safety of our customers and employees. Since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, Delta has moved quickly to transform the industry standard of clean while offering customers more space across the travel journey. These and numerous other layers of protection ensure a safe and comfortable travel experience for our customers and employees.

With our mission of connecting the people and cultures of the globe, Delta strives to foster understanding across a diverse world and serve as a force for social good.

Harvard study: Masks, when worn throughout travel, offer significant protection from COVID-19

From Delta Air Lines:

Face masks are an essential part of a layered strategy to keep customers safe and reduce transmission of COVID-19 throughout air travel, according to a new technical bulletin published this week by faculty at Harvard’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

The study’s conclusions reference recent research that suggests the universal use of masks in settings such as those on aircraft may reduce infection risk from respiratory particles to less than 1 percent.

“The use of face masks is critically important throughout the air travel process, from entering the airport for departure to leaving the destination airport,” according to the Harvard report. “When the use of masks is implemented with other measures built into aircraft operations, such as increased ventilation with HEPA filtration in the aircraft and disinfection of surfaces, these layered [interventions] offer significant protection from acquiring COVID-19 through air travel.”

Harvard’s bulletin – part of a set of evidence-based recommendations to reduce the public health risks of flying during the COVID-19 pandemic – also cites another report that describes two COVID-19-positive passengers who traveled on a 15-hour flight with 350 other passengers; both wore masks, and no one else on the flight was infected.

Delta was one of the first airlines to require customers and employees to wear a mask or face covering across Delta touchpoints at airports and onboard the aircraft. It’s an extension of our safety commitment, and enforcement is a responsibility we take seriously. We ask customers to acknowledge as part of the check-in process their willingness to wear a mask throughout travel. And we insist that customers who have an underlying condition that prevents them from wearing a mask complete a “Clearance-To-Fly” process upon arrival at the airport.

“There’s no doubt that wearing a face mask is one of the most important ways to stay safe in the airport and on board, and it’s why we were so quick to incorporate it into our approach to protecting our customers and employees,” said Delta’s Chief Customer Experience Officer Bill Lentsch. “Thanks for doing your part to stay safe and protect those around you.”

Delta has implemented layers of protection from check-in to baggage claim to deliver a new standard of cleanliness, more space and safer service and care for customers and employees alike. When added to measures such as sanitizing aircraft surfaces with electrostatic spray before 100% of flights, blocking middle seats while capping aircraft capacity, and changing aircraft HEPA filters twice as often as recommended, mask-wearing provides a consistent layer across all travel touch points that can help prevent the spread of COVID-19.

Delta continues to make the necessary decision to ban customers who refuse to wear masks onboard. So far, more than 300 individuals have been barred from future Delta flights for failing to comply with this critical safety precaution.

Delta Air Lines announces upsize of SkyMiles financing to $9 billion

Delta Air Lines today announced the upsize and pricing of the previously announced private offering by Delta and its indirect wholly owned subsidiary, SkyMiles IP Ltd. An aggregate of $2.5 billion in principal amount of 4.5% senior secured notes due 2025 and an aggregate of $3.5 billion in principal amount of 4.75% senior secured notes due 2028 (collectively the “Notes”) are expected to be issued on Sept. 23, 2020, subject to customary closing conditions. The Notes will be issued at a price to investors of 100% of their principal amount. Concurrently with the issuance of the Notes, Delta and SkyMiles IP Ltd. expect to enter into a credit agreement providing for a $3.0 billion term loan facility (“New Credit Facility”), also subject to customary closing conditions. In total, the Notes and New Credit Facility will provide gross proceeds of $9.0 billion, an increase of $2.5 billion from the anticipated original $6.5 billiondeal size, at a blended average annual rate of 4.75%.

Delta launches service at new Salt Lake City airport terminal as part of $12B investment in U.S. airports

Delta Air Lines has made this announcement:

  • The new 900,000-square-foot Concourse A houses 78 gates 
  • Our largest-ever Delta Sky Club includes an outdoor Sky Deck 
  • The airport will deliver $5.5 billion in estimated economic impact to the Salt Lake City region 

Delta Flight 2020 departed for Atlanta from Salt Lake City International Airport’s stunning new Concourse A Tuesday, marking the official first flight in Delta’s new home in this core hub after a decade of partnership in planning, design and construction to deliver the first U.S. global aviation hub of the 21st century.

“I want to congratulate the Salt Lake City leadership for their vision and partnership in creating this iconic new air travel experience,” said Delta CEO Ed Bastian. “On behalf of Delta’s global workforce, and the more than 4,000 employees based in SLC, we look forward to welcoming and serving our customers traveling to, from and through the Mountain West region.”

The new SLC includes convenient amenities designed to enhance the overall travel experience. From a more efficient baggage-handling system that accommodates luggage of all sizes and shapes so skis don’t  need to be dropped off at a special counter to a state-of-the-art parking garage with a mobile app service to remind passengers where they parked their car, the new SLC was designed with today’s traveler in mind.

As a mid-sized hub connected to global destinations, the new Salt Lake City airport will remain an important part of Delta’s overall network strategy as the airline recovers from the global pandemic. Delta’s involvement in the completion of this airport, coupled with the airline’s extension of its current lease through 2034, stands as a testament to the relationship between Delta, the state of Utah and the airport.

“This day has been years in the making,” said Bill Wyatt, Executive Director of Salt Lake City Department of Airports. “To say we are excited to be here today is an understatement. After six years of construction and many more years of planning, we are proud to open the first new U.S. hub airport in the 21st century.”

The new airport also boasts Delta’s newest and largest Delta Sky Club at 28,000 square feet. With a unique look inspired by the canyons and landscape of the region, the Club offers guests views of the Wasatch Range from the covered open-air Sky Deck and a 360-degree fireplace in the middle of the lounge on their journey through the Beehive State.

Investing in infrastructure 

Delta is investing more than $12 billion in airport projects that modernize the airline’s hub infrastructure and customer experience, including new construction at Los Angeles International Airport and New York’s LaGuardia Airport in addition to the work in SLC.

Delta people have played key roles since day one in contributing to the new SLC, which opens on time and on budget.

Salt Lake City International Airport will remain an important part of Delta’s overall network strategy as the airline recovers from the global pandemic. Delta’s involvement in the completion of this airport, coupled with the airlines’ extension of its current lease through 2034, stands as a testament to the relationship among Delta, the airport, and the state of Utah.

“For the past 60 years, Delta has remained a steadfast, strategic partner to the Salt Lake City International Airport and today, we are gathered to celebrate the opening of the new gold standard for travelers coming to or through this great region that we’ve built together,” said Scott Santoro, Delta’s Vice President – Sales for the West Coast. “This incredible space is more than the largest new build in the Western United States for more than 25 years. It solidifies Delta as the airline of choice for passengers traveling to, from, and through Salt Lake for both business and leisure travel for years to come.”

Security checkpoints in five Delta hubs feature new layer of protection with antimicrobial bins for travelers

Delta Air Lines is rolling out antimicrobial bins in partnership with TSA starting this week as part of the Delta CareStandard:

  • Latest way Delta and TSA are partnering to keep travelers safe at all steps of the journey
  • Innovative bins coming to automated screening lanes at Atlanta, Minneapolis/St. Paul, Los Angeles, New York-LaGuardia and New York-JFK this month

Beginning this week, antimicrobial technology in airport security checkpoints is making the airport experience at select Delta hubs even safer. Thanks to new security bins made of innovative antimicrobial material, travelers can rest assured that their belongings will remain clean and safe as they pass through security.

In partnership with the Transportation Security Administration, Delta is rolling out these antimicrobial bins to automated screening lanes in Atlanta, Minneapolis/St. Paul, Los Angeles, New York-LaGuardia and New York-JFK starting this week and continuing throughout the month. Delta will evaluate opportunities for expansion to other markets following the launch in these cities.

The new bins prevent the growth of a broad spectrum of bacteria through antimicrobial technology that is built into the bin and continuously minimizes the presence of microbes throughout the bin’s lifecycle. A sleek black color and indicators on bin handles will help customers know their belongings are safely traveling through the security checkpoint protected by this antimicrobial advancement.

This innovation in safety builds on the Delta CareStandard and is the latest advancement in Delta and TSA’s partnership to continue enhancing the customer experience, which has included launching the first biometric terminal and working together to speed up international security lines in Atlanta.

TSA also continues to adjust its security operations during the pandemic by implementing proactive and protective measures at security checkpoints to make the screening process safer — high-touch screening equipment and bins are cleaned hourly, and other surfaces are cleaned daily or as needed in airports nationwide.

Delta also eliminates change fees

Delta Air Lines made this announcement:

At Delta’s Investor Day in December 2019, the airline shared its intent to overhaul its change fee structure, delivering the flexibility and simplicity customers are looking for. Since then, Delta has put its full focus into taking care of customers throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, including implementing a waiver to eliminate change fees in March 2020. Delta is now doubling down on its mission to make it easier for customers to book, change or cancel their travel plans by making this policy permanent for tickets purchased for travel within the U.S.

“We’ve said before that we need to approach flexibility differently than this industry has in the past, and today’s announcement builds on that promise to ensure we’re offering industry-leading flexibility, space and care to our customers,” said Delta CEO Ed Bastian. “We want our customers to book and travel with peace of mind, knowing that we’ll continue evaluating our policies to maintain the high standard of flexibility they expect.”

The elimination of change fees is effective immediately and includes tickets purchased for travel within the domestic U.S., Puerto Rico and U.S. Virgin Islands in Delta’s First Class, Delta Premium Select, Delta Comfort+ and Main Cabin, with the exception of Basic Economy tickets.

Additionally, Delta will extend its waiver on change fees for newly purchased flights, including international flights and Basic Economy fares, through the end of the year and will extend its expiration on travel credits through December 2022 for tickets booked before April 17, 2020.

Other steps Delta has taken to deliver flexibility and a superior experience to customers include:

  • Blocking middle seats through Jan 6, 2021, ensuring more space for safer travel, on all flights and including for Basic Economy customers
  • Giving customers industry-leading flexibility to plan, re-book and travel,  Delta has provided more than $2.6 billion in cash refunds in 2020
  • Delta was the first airline to Extend Medallion Status through 2021, and offer extensions for Delta Sky Club Memberships and more
  • Offering a 24-hour risk free cancellation policy when customers purchase a new ticket
  • Empowering our employees to use situational flexibility when customers need it most

As customers consider future travel, Delta’s multi-layered approach to their health and safety ensures peace of mind throughout the travel journey. These include, but are not limited to:

  • Sanitizing all aircraft with electrostatic spraying before departure and extensive pre-flight disinfection of high-touch points throughout the aircraft interior.
  • Using state-of-the-art air circulation systems with HEPA filters that extract more than 99.99% of particles, including viruses.
  • Requiring face masks throughout the airport, in Delta Sky Clubs and on board the aircraft

Delta to add more flights across Atlantic and Pacific this winter and summer 2021

Delta Air Lines has made this announcement:

As Delta works to restart service in line with the lifting of travel restrictions, potential vaccine availability and the gradual return of demand, customers will see more trans-Atlantic and trans-Pacific flights to top business and leisure destinations for the winter 2020-2021 and summer 2021 seasons. While the airline expects pre-COVID level recovery for international flying to continue to lag U.S. domestic, Delta plans to add over 50 transoceanic flights next summer, compared to the summer 2020 schedule.

Delta will focus its strengths in its core markets and with the support of its partners, offer customers a wide array of onward connections.

Delta will operate the adjusted schedule with a more efficient, upgraded fleet of Airbus A350-900s, A330-900neos and refurbished Boeing 767s, following the retirement of its Boeing 777 aircraft by the end of October 2020.

Delta’s schedule remains subject to change due to the evolving nature of COVID-19, customer demand, government travel regulations and federal health guidelines. Specific restart dates may vary for previously suspended routes due to travel restrictions and other operational requirements. Delta will make decisions about resuming additional service on other routes at a later date.

Trans-Pacific Schedule

Delta is maintaining its global presence and investment in Seattle (SEA) over the next year, which continues to be a premier gateway for travel to Asia. Continued daily service next year from Sea-Tac to Tokyo-Haneda (HND), Seoul-Incheon (ICN), Beijing (BJS), and Shanghai (PVG) will allow customers to connect further within the region through Delta’s partners, Korean Air and China Eastern.

With the opening of the new international arrivals facility at SEA, Delta will offer an entirely upgraded experience for local and connecting customers with direct or one-stop partner access to over 95% of Asia markets. Customers traveling from Seattle to any destination the airline serves in Asia will enjoy an enhanced experience on efficient, next-generation aircraft featuring the award-winning Delta One suites and the popular Delta Premium Select cabin.

At Delta’s partner hub at ICN, customers can connect on Delta’s current flights from Atlanta (ATL), Detroit (DTW) and Seattle to over 70 destinations throughout Asia via partner Korean Air. In April 2021, Delta plans to return to service between Minneapolis (MSP) and Seoul-Incheon.

Delta also remains committed to the Japan market and by summer 2021, will offer service from seven U.S. cities to Haneda, Tokyo’s closest and most convenient airport. Currently, the airline offers up to 14 weekly flights across its Atlanta, Detroit, Los Angeles (LAX) and Seattle gateways. Beginning in December 2020, Delta plans to add up to four-times weekly services between Haneda and Honolulu (HNL).

Between the U.S. and China, Delta is working closely with governments in both countries to increase service in response to high demand. Currently, Delta operates four weekly flights to Shanghai (PVG) from Detroit and Seattle. Subject to approval, the airline plans to increase service between these destinations. In summer 2021, Delta hopes to operate daily service between Shanghai and Detroit, Seattle and Los Angeles, plus daily service connecting Sea-Tac with Beijing’s new Daxing Airport, subject to government approval.

To Australia, Delta plans to maintain a minimum of thrice-weekly service between Los Angeles and Sydney (SYD) before resuming daily service in 2021. The flight will be operated on Airbus 350-900 aircraft beginning in November, which offers more luxury and comfort with the Delta One suite, Delta Premium Select cabin, large in-flight entertainment screens and more personal stowage.

 

U.S. Hub Route IATA Winter Schedule

(Oct. 25-March 27)

IATA Summer Schedule

(March 28-Oct. 30)

ATL ATL-HND 4x weekly 1 daily
ATL-ICN +5x weekly 1 daily
 
DTW DTW-HND 3x weekly 1 daily
DTW-NGO 3x weekly
DTW-ICN Daily 1 daily
DTW-PVG* +2x weekly 1 daily
 
LAX LAX-HND 3x weekly 1 daily
LAX-PVG* 1 daily
LAX-SYD +3x weekly 1 daily
 
MSP MSP-HND 5x weekly
MSP-ICN 5x weekly
 
SEA SEA-HND 4x weekly 1 daily
SEA-ICN +4x weekly 1 daily
SEA-PVG* +2x weekly 1 daily
SEA-BJS* 1 daily
Additional Service PDX-HND 5x weekly
HNL-HND 4x weekly** 1 daily
ICN-MNL 4x weekly 1 daily

*Subject to government approval

**Starting in December 2020

Trans-Atlantic Schedule

As travel restrictions lift and Delta begins to restore its global network, the airline plans to increase flying in the trans-Atlantic market from winter 2020-2021 to summer 2021.

Between September and October, Delta will resume service to several major business and leisure markets, including a buildup at its hub in New York-JFK.

In September, Delta will resume:

  • Atlanta – Lagos*(LOS)
  • Boston – London-Heathrow (LHR)
  • New York-JFK – Accra* (ACC)
  • New York-JFK – Barcelona (BCN)
  • New York-JFK – Madrid (MAD)
  • New York-JFK – Rome (FCO)

In October, Delta will add:

  • New York-JFK – Brussels (BRU)
  • New York-JFK – Dublin (DUB
  • New York-JFK – Frankfurt (FRA)
  • New York-JFK – Zurich (ZRH)
  • Seattle – Paris-Charles de Gaulle (CDG)

Service between Boston and Paris will return in November.

Following this resumption of service in the fall, Delta expects to maintain a similar schedule across the Atlantic through winter 2021.

Moving into next summer, Delta will expand its hub-to-hub flying between the U.S. and Europe, offering nonstop daily service to Amsterdam (AMS), Paris and London-Heathrow from Atlanta, Boston, Detroit, New York-JFK and Minneapolis. From Seattle and Salt Lake City, customers will have nonstop daily access to Amsterdam and Paris. Delta’s LAX hub will offer nonstop service to Paris. This expansion also marks a restart of trans-Atlantic service for L.A., Minneapolis and Salt Lake City.

Additionally, Delta will add back service to Paris from our focus cities Cincinnati (CVG) and Raleigh-Durham (RDU), as well as service to Amsterdam from Portland (PDX).

From AMS, CDG or LHR, customers will then have access to over 160 destinations throughout the region via partners Virgin Atlantic and Air France-KLM.

Delta remains committed to ensuring customers benefit from easy access across the pond through its key hubs in ATL, BOS and JFK. By next summer, customers traveling through JFK will have direct access to six more seasonal destinations popular with leisure travelers. Delta will also resume popular vacation spots from Atlanta, such as Barcelona, Dublin, Rome and Madrid. Service from Boston to Paris, London-Heathrow and Dublin will increase to daily.

U.S. Hub Route IATA Winter Schedule

(Oct. 25-March 27)

IATA Summer Schedule

(March 28-Oct. 30)

ATL ATL-AMS 2 daily 3 daily
ATL-CDG 1 daily 2 daily
ATL-FRA 4x weekly 1 daily
ATL-JNB* 3x weekly** 5x weekly
ATL-LHR 1 daily 2 daily
ATL-LOS* Up to 1 daily 4x weekly
ATL-MUC 3x weekly 1 daily
ATL-BCN 1 daily
ATL-DUB 1 daily
ATL-FCO 1 daily
ATL-MAD 1 daily
ATL-STR 5x weekly
 
BOS BOS-AMS 1 daily 1 daily
BOS-CDG 4x weekly 1 daily
BOS-LHR 5x weekly 1 daily
BOS-DUB   1 daily
 
DTW DTW-AMS 1 daily 3 daily
DTW-CDG 1 daily 1 daily
DTW-FRA   1 daily
DTW-LHR   1 daily
 
JFK JFK-ACC* Up to 1 daily 5x weekly
JFK-AMS 1 daily 2 daily
JFK-BCN 5x weekly 1 daily
JFK-BRU 5x weekly 1 daily
JFK-CDG 1 daily 2 daily
JFK-DSS 3x weekly 3x weekly
JFK-DUB 5x weekly 1 daily
JFK-FCO 5x weekly Up to 2 daily
JFK-FRA 5x weekly 1 daily
JFK-LHR 1 daily 2 daily
JFK-MAD 5x weekly 1 daily
JFK-MXP 5x weekly 1 daily
JFK-TLV Up to 2 daily 2 daily
JFK-ZRH 5x weekly 1 daily
JFK-ATH   Up to 2 daily
JFK-EDI   1 daily
JFK-KEF   5x weekly
JFK-LIS   1 daily
JFK-LOS*   3x weekly
JFK-NCE   1 daily
JFK-VCE   1 daily
 
LAX LAX-CDG   1 daily
 
MSP MSP-AMS   2 daily
MSP-CDG   1 daily
MSP-LHR   1 daily
 
SEA SEA-AMS 1 daily 1 daily
SEA-CDG 4x weekly 1 daily
 
SLC SLC-AMS 1 daily
SLC-CDG 1 daily
 
Focus Cities RDU-CDG 5x weekly
PDX-AMS   4x weekly
CVG-CDG 4x weekly

*Subject to government approval

**Starting Dec. 13

IATA refers to the International Air Transport Association.

Delta aircraft photo gallery (Airbus):

Reuters: Delta Air Lines plans to resume more international routes

From Reuters:

“Delta Air Lines Inc on Friday said it plans to resume 50 flights on the international route this winter and in 2021 that were suspended due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Delta said its resumed service would include daily flights from Seattle to Tokyo, Seoul, Beijing and Shanghai.”