Tag Archives: MIA

European Commission updates the EU Air Safety List, Avior Airlines is added

Avior Airlines Boeing 737-401 YV3158 (msn 23984) MIA (Jay Selman). Image: 403408.

On November 30, 2017 the European Commission updated the EU Air Safety List, the list of non-European airlines that do not meet international safety standards, and are therefore subject to an operating ban or operational restrictions within the European Union.

The EU Air Safety List seeks to ensure the highest level of air safety for European citizens, which is a top priority of the Commission’s Aviation Strategy. With this update, one airline, Avior Airlines (Venezuela), is added to the list, while two others – Mustique Airways (St. Vincent and the Grenadines) and Urga (Ukraine) – are removed following safety improvements.

Commissioner for Transport Violeta Bulc said: “Our objective is to offer the highest level of safety in European skies. The EU’s Air Safety List remains one of our most effective tools to achieve this. Today we are showing that with our help, airlines can be quickly removed from the list when they tackle their safety issues. Work pays off and I hope that the example of Mustique Airways and Urga will inspire others.”

Avior Airlines (certified in Venezuela) is added to the list due to unaddressed safety deficiencies that were detected by the European Aviation Safety Agency during the assessment for a third country operator authorisation (TCO)[1]. On the contrary, Mustique Airways and Aviation Company Urga – which are respectively certified in St. Vincent and the Grenadines and Ukraine – made safety improvements since their inclusion to the Air Safety List in May 2017. This allows them to be today removed from the list.

The EU Air Safety List not only helps to maintain high levels of safety in the EU, but it also helps affected airlines and countries to improve their levels of safety, in order for them to eventually be taken off the list. In addition, the EU Air Safety List has become a major preventive tool, as it motivates countries with safety problems to act upon them before a ban under the EU Air Safety List would become necessary.

With this update, a total of 178 airlines are banned from EU skies:

  • 172 airlines certified in 16 states[2], due to a lack of safety oversight by the aviation authorities from these states.
  • Six individual airlines, based on safety concerns with regard to these airlines themselves: Avior Airlines (Venezuela), Iran Aseman Airlines (Iran), Iraqi Airways (Iraq), Blue Wing Airlines (Suriname), Med-View Airlines (Nigeria) and Air Zimbabwe (Zimbabwe).

An additional six airlines are subject to operational restrictions and can only fly to the EU with specific aircraft types: Afrijet and Nouvelle Air Affaires SN2AG (Gabon), Air Koryo (Democratic People’s Republic of Korea), Air Service Comores (the Comoros), Iran Air (Iran) and TAAG Angola Airlines (Angola).

Background information

This update of the Air Safety List is based on the unanimous opinion of the aviation safety experts from the Member States who met from 13 to 15 November within the EU Air Safety Committee (ASC). This Committee is chaired by the European Commission with the support of the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA). The update equally got the support from the European Parliament’s Transport Committee. Assessment is made against international safety standards, and notably the standards promulgated by the International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO).

The Commission is constantly looking at ways to improve air safety. One such way is to work with aviation authorities worldwide to raise global safety standards. With this in mind, EASA is therefore implementing technical cooperation projects with partner countries and regions. An example is the “Improving air transport in Central Africa” (ATA-AC) project, where EASA works with a number of African states on several aspects of aviation safety.

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Copyright Photo: Avior Airlines has been added to the list. Avior Airlines Boeing 737-401 YV3158 (msn 23984) MIA (Jay Selman). Image: 403408.

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Delta announces retirement plans for the last Boeing 747 revenue flights

Airline Color Scheme - Introduced 2007

Delta Air Lines issued this statement on November 14, 2017:

Delta employees, customers and aviation enthusiasts have been eagerly flying the airline’s remaining Boeing 747-400s since Delta said in 2014 that it would retire the Queen of the Skies at the end of 2017.

There will soon be more chances to see and perhaps take part in some of the last Delta 747 flights – the last to be flown by any U.S. passenger airline. Here are seven things to know about Delta’s big goodbye to the 747:

  1. Delta is operating the Boeing 747-400 on daily scheduled service between its Detroit hub and its partner hub at Seoul-Incheon.
  2. Here are the final regularly scheduled flights of the Delta 747:
    • Final U.S. departure: Flight 159 at Detroit to Seoul-Incheon at 12:31 p.m.on December 15, 2017
    • Final Asia Pacific arrival: Flight 159 at Seoul-Incheon from Detroit at 4:30 p.m. on December 16, 2017
    • Final Asia Pacific departure: Flight 158 at Seoul-Incheon to Detroit at 11:15 a.m. on December 17, 2017
    • Final U.S. arrival: Flight 158 at Detroit from Seoul-Incheon at 10:14 a.m.on December 17, 2017
  3. Delta will take the 747 on an employee farewell tour from Detroit to Seattle/Tacoma on December 18, 2017 Seattle/Tacoma to Atlanta on December 19, 2017 and Atlanta to Minneapolis-St. Paul on December 20, 2017.
  4. Customers can bid for a spot on these farewell flights via SkyMiles Experiences using their SkyMiles.
  5. Employees and retirees can purchase a seat on these flights on a first-come, first-serve basis beginning at noon ET November 20, 2017 at a discounted rate, with all proceeds going to the Airloom Project, the organization behind the 747 Experience exhibit at the Delta Flight Museum.
  6. The 747 will fly a handful of sports team and ad-hoc charter flights through December 31, 2017.
  7. Delta will fly its final Boeing 747 to its retirement place in Arizona in early January. This ferry flight will not be open to passengers.

Delta will be celebrating the iconic and revolutionary 747 throughout December in all of its channels and encourages customers, enthusiasts and employees to share their own tributes and remembrances using the #DL747Farewell hashtag.

Copyright Photo: Delta Air Lines Boeing 747-451 N663US (msn 23818) NRT (Michael B. Ing). Image: 913462.

Current Livery:

Historic Liveries:

Bottom Copyright Photo: It all started with the Boeing 747-132s (below) and later with the ex-Northwest Boeing 747-451s (above). Delta Air Lines Boeing 747-132 N9896 (msn 19896) MIA (Bruce Drum). Image: 101068.

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United is looking at adding up to 40 used Airbus A320 Family aircraft

United Airlines Airbus A320-232 N447UA (msn 836)  MIA (Jay Selman). Image: 403444.

United Airlines, according to Reuters, is looking at adding additional used Airbus A319 and/or A320 aircraft:

“The carrier is looking at A319 and A320 single-aisle aircraft, the Chicago chapter of the United pilots union said in an Oct. 10 memo to its members. A deal for 30 to 40 of the jets is “imminent,” according to the memo. The ultimate agreement could be for fewer.”

Copyright Photo: United Airlines Airbus A320-232 N447UA (msn 836) MIA (Jay Selman). Image: 403444.

Airberlin operates its last flight

Airberlin (airberlin.com) Airbus A320-214  WL D-ABNQ (msn 6877) ZRH (Rolf Wallner). Image: 933101.

Airberlin, as previously reported, is closing its doors on October 27, 2017 and ended all commerical operations.

The last Airberlin revenue flight was flight AB 6210 from Munich on Friday, October 27, 2017. Airbus A320 D-ABHO operated the last flight which arrived at 11:58 pm (2358) local time.

Video:

This video films activities on the last day of operations on a Dusseldorf – Berlin (Tegel) flight:

On social media, Airberlin had a short message:

The company started as an U.S. airline named Air Berlin USA (below). The first revenue flight was on April 28, 1979. In 1990, the airline became a German airline and the USA was dropped from the title.

Top Copyright Photo: Airberlin (airberlin.com) Airbus A320-214 WL D-ABNQ (msn 6877) ZRH (Rolf Wallner). Image: 933101.

Below Copyright Photo: Airberlin (airberlin.com) Airbus A330-223 D-ALPB (msn 432) ARN (Stefan Sjogren). Image: 932873.

Airberlin (airberlin.com) Airbus A330-223 D-ALPB (msn 432) ARN (Stefan Sjogren). Image: 932873.

Below Copyright Photo: Air-Berlin (airberlin.com) Boeing 737-86J WL D-ABAT (msn 29120) ARN (Stefan Sjogren). Image: 935316.

Air-Berlin (airberlin.com) Boeing 737-86J WL D-ABAT (msn 29120) ARN (Stefan Sjogren). Image: 935316.

Below Copyright Photo: Air-Berlin (airberlin.com) Boeing 737-76J WL D-ABLA (msn 36114) STN (Antony J. Best). Image: 901995.

Air-Berlin (airberlin.com) Boeing 737-76J WL D-ABLA (msn 36114) STN (Antony J. Best). Image: 901995.

Airberlin (Germany):

Video:

Bottom Copyright Photo: Air Berlin USA Boeing 707-331 N763AB (msn 17676) MIA (Al Rodriguez – Bruce Drum Collection). Image: 925005.

Air Berlin USA:

Air Berlin USA Boeing 707-331 N763AB (msn 17676) MIA (Al Rodriguez - Bruce Drum Collection). Image: 925005.

Frontier announces nine additional routes connecting 13 cities

"Powder, the Polar Bear"

Frontier Airlines issued this statement:

As a further expansion of its commitment to deliver low fares nationwide, low cost airline Frontier Airlines has announced nine more routes connecting 13 cities. This announcement comes just two months after the airline’s previous announcement of more than 80 new routes across the US, meaning the airline now serves more than 90 percent of American households. All routes are on sale, with new route fares as low as $39.

Departure City Arrival City Start Date
Atlanta to/from San Jose April 9, 2018
Austin to/from Cleveland April 9, 2018
Charleston to/from Chicago O’Hare May 11, 2018
Charleston to/from Philadelphia Feb. 20, 2018
Colorado Springs to/from San Antonio April 8, 2018
Colorado Springs to/from San Jose April 9, 2018
Colorado Springs to/from Minneapolis April 9, 2018
Colorado Springs to/from Seattle April 8, 2018
San Jose to/from Cincinnati April 8, 2018

These additional announcements come just two months after the carrier made the largest network expansion announcement in its history. In that announcement, the carrier introduced 21 new cities and 85 new routes. These previously announced routes are now on sale today. These announcements come as the carrier continues to deliver on their promise of providing Low Fares Done Right to more customers than ever before.

In addition to these new announcements, Frontier has extended its schedule through Aug. 11, 2018.

Copyright Photo: Frontier Airlines (2nd) Airbus A321-211 WL N711FR (msn 7184) (Polar Bear) MIA (Jay Selman). Image: 403406.

United announces the last Boeing 747 revenue flight

United Airlines Boeing 747-422 N128UA (msn 30023) NRT (Michael B. Ing). Image: 923735.

United Airlines made this announcement:

In celebration of United Airlines retiring the Boeing 747 from its fleet, United flight 747, on Tuesday, November 7, 2017 from San Francisco to Honolulu will be the airline’s farewell flight to the 747 fleet.

This journey will serve as the ultimate throwback for customers, employees and invited guests as it recreates the first 747 flight operated by United in 1970. From a 1970s-inspired menu to retro uniforms for flight attendants to inflight entertainment befitting of that first flight, passengers will help send the Queen of the Skies off in true style. The original United 747 aircraft that first made this journey from San Francisco to Honolulu was named the “Friend Ship,” the same name bestowed on this farewell flight.

Seats on this special, one-way trip, United flight 747, are available for purchase now at united.com or through the United app. The seats in the upper deck will not be sold, giving all guests the opportunity to spend time in this iconic space.

Customers seated in United Polaris first class and United Polaris business class will be entered into a drawing that will take place at the gate prior to boarding for an opportunity to occupy one of a select number of seats in the upper deck during the flight.

The journey will begin with a gate celebration at 9 a.m. local time at San Francisco International Airport, featuring a Boeing 747 gallery, remarks from United employees and executives, as well as refreshments. The flight will depart San Francisco International Airport at 11 a.m. local time, landing at Honolulu International Airport at 2:45 p.m. local time. Upon landing in Honolulu, local employees will welcome the aircraft with final festivities to close out the historic day. Customers and fans of the Queen of the Skies are encouraged to use the #UA747Farewell hashtag in social media posts.

United and the Boeing 747 through the Years

April 13, 1966: Boeing announces it will build a 490-passenger 747 transport. Construction is set to begin in June on a new plant in Everett, Washington.

January 3, 1967: The first production workers for the 747 program arrive in Everett. The 50,000 who would produce the world’s largest civilian airplane were known as The Incredibles, and they earned the label by bringing the Jumbo Jet dream to reality in only 16 months.

September 30, 1968: The first Boeing 747-100, City of Everett, is rolled out at their Washington plant, painted with the insignias of the 27 airlines that had already ordered the aircraft including United.

February 9, 1969: The Boeing 747-100 makes its first flight.

January 21, 1970: The Boeing 747 makes its first commercial flight from New York to London for Pan American World Airways.

June 26, 1970: Continental Airlines becomes one of the first carriers to put the Boeing 747 into U.S. domestic service, flying from Chicago to Los Angeles and onward to Honolulu.

June 26, 1970: United Airlines receives its first Boeing 747-100 complete with a christening ceremony fit for a luxury liner.

July 23, 1970: United makes its first Boeing 747 commercial flight, with a trip from San Francisco to Honolulu.

United Airlines Boeing 747-122 N4710U (msn 19755) JFK (Bruce Drum). Image: 101357.

Above Copyright Photo: United Airlines Boeing 747-122 N4710U (msn 19755) JFK (Bruce Drum). Image: 101357.

Airline Color Scheme - Introduced 1972 (4 Star Friendship)

Above Copyright Photo: United Airlines Boeing 747-122 N4728U (msn 19925) “747 Friend Ship” LAX (Bruce Drum). Image: 103100.

 

January 1977: A modified Boeing 747-100 is delivered to NASA to serve as a carrier vehicle for the Space Shuttle.

April 22, 1985: United announces its plan to acquire Pan Am’s Pacific routes, as well as 11 Boeing 747SP planes. The 747SPs feature a 48-foot-shorter body and fly higher, faster, and farther than standard 747 models.

United Airlines Boeing 747SP-21 N149UA (msn 21649) MIA (Bruce Drum). Image: 101362.

Above Copyright: United Airlines Boeing 747SP-21 N149UA (msn 21649) MIA (Bruce Drum). Image: 101362.

January 29-30, 1988: Friendship One, a Boeing 747SP owned by United Airlines, sets the around-the-world air speed record of 36 hours, 54 minutes, and 15 seconds. This special flight raises $500,000 for children’s charities through the Friendship Foundation. Tickets cost a minimum of $5,000, and special guest passengers included astronaut Neil Armstrong, famed test pilots Bob Hoover and Lieutenant General Laurence C. Craigie, and Moya Lear, the widow of Lear Jet founder Bill Lear.

June, 1989: United Airlines receives their first Boeing 747-400 which provides increased range.

United Airlines Boeing 747-422 N117UA (msn 28810) LHR (Antony J. Best). Image: 920997.

Above Copyright Photo: United Airlines Boeing 747-422 N117UA (msn 28810) LHR (Antony J. Best). Image: 920997.

August 23, 1990: The first of two modified Boeing 747-200Bs is delivered to the Air Force for presidential transport. Better known as Air Force One, these planes still serve the president today, having replaced the Boeing 707-320Bs that had served as the presidential aircraft for almost 30 years.

September 1996: A 747SP previously flown by United is transformed into NASA’s SOFIA, or Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, which carries a 17-ton, 8-foot-wide infrared telescope mounted behind an enormous sliding door.

United Airlines Boeing 747-422 N179UA (msn 25158) SFO (Mark Durbin). Image: 901763.

Above Copyright Photo: United Airlines Boeing 747-422 N179UA (msn 25158) SFO (Mark Durbin). Image: 901763.

June 28, 2014: Boeing delivers the 1,500th 747 to come off the production line. The 747 aircraft is the world’s first wide-body airplane in history to reach the 1,500 production units milestone.

January 11, 2017: United announces that it will retire the Boeing 747-400 fleet in the last quarter of 2017.

July 28, 2017: United schedules a special domestic flight from Chicago O’Hare to San Francisco to allow more people to say farewell to the Queen of the Skies.

October 29, 2017: United flies its last international 747 flight from Seoul to San Francisco.

November 7, 2017: United celebrates the retirement of the Boeing 747 with a fitting full-circle moment. A special retro event sees the aircraft flying from San Francisco to Honolulu—a nod to its first-ever flight back in 1970.

Top Copyright Photo: United Airlines Boeing 747-422 N128UA (msn 30023) NRT (Michael B. Ing). Image: 923735.

United Airlines (historic liveries):

United Airlines (current livery – Boeing):

Endangered Species List:

Plans are underway to bring back Midwest Express Airlines

Curt Drumm of Manitowoc, WI is leading an effort to bring back Midwest Express Airlines. A website has been established and a small group is looking for investors. If it happens, the second version of Midwest Express would also be based in Milwaukee.

The website has made this statement:

The Return of a Legend:

Plans are underway to bring back the iconic Midwest Express Airlines. Remember the great service, comfortable seating and chocolate cookies? So much of that went away, and hasn’t come back.

With fewer flights out of Milwaukee’s Mitchell International Airport (MKE), and even fewer non-stop destinations, travel has become more of a hassle. Add long connections, service fees and crowded planes, it’s just not fun anymore. Many other mid-size airports face the same problem, too.

That’s why we’re working hard to bring back Midwest Express. With convenient destinations for business travelers, roomy seats, WiFi and friendly people who care about you, it’s going to help you plan your travel more efficiently. Flights to many of our destinations will allow you to travel out and back on the same day, getting you back home at night, instead of being away.

We are currently finalizing our plans. If you’d like to be part of it, either as an investor or a member of our team, let us know. There’s a contact form below. Or just follow our progress right here. We’ll keep you posted.

Thanks for your interest in the new Midwest Express. More details will be coming soon. We can’t wait to get in the air!

(Oh, and by the way, we haven’t forgotten the cookies!)

Midwest Express Airlines McDonnell Douglas DC-9-32 N302ME (msn 47102) MIA (Bruce Drum). Image: 103360.

Above Copyright Photo: Midwest Express Airlines McDonnell Douglas DC-9-32 N302ME (msn 47102) MIA (Bruce Drum). Image: 103360.

Note: The original Midwest Express Airlines (above) commenced scheduled passenger flights on June 11, 1984. In March 2003 it became Midwest Airlines (below). On June 23, 2009, Republic Airways Holdings, Inc. announced they would acquire Midwest Airlines for $31 million. The purchase was finalized on July 30, 2009. On November 2, 2009 the last flight was operated and the brand was retired.

Airline Color Scheme - Introduced 2003

Above Copyright Photo: Midwest Airlines (USA) Boeing 717-2BL N924ME (msn 55190) DCA (Bruce Drum). Image: 100801.