Tag Archives: Finnair

Finnair completes a lease financing arrangement for its next Airbus A350 delivery, will work with Fintraffic

Finnair has made this announcement:

As a part of Finnair’s rebuild program, the company has finalized a lease financing arrangement for its next A350 aircraft delivery, with JLPS Holding Ireland Limited as the lessor and lease servicer. In the arrangement, Finnair will assign the purchase of the Airbus A350 aircraft to a third party, and then leases it back for its own operation. The aircraft is expected to be delivered to Finnair in the second quarter of 2022. The operating lease period is a minimum of 12 years, including a storage period expected to commence in the fourth quarter of 2021, concurrent with the aircraft‘s sale.

The total positive cash effect of the arrangement for Finnair in 2021–2022 is in excess of 100 million US dollars compared to a situation in which the aircraft had been purchased and owned by Finnair.

Finnair has ordered a total of 19 new A350-900 XWB aircraft from Airbus, of which 16 have been delivered as of September 1, 2020; the aircraft concerned will be the 17th. The remaining two A350 aircraft are expected to be delivered in the fourth quarter of 2024 and the first quarter of 2025.

Videos:

In other news, Finnair and Finland’s air navigation service provider Fintraffic ANS have joined forces to reduce CO2 emissions and enhance commercial aviation’s environmental footprint.

 

Under the new initiative, Finnair will share fuel consumption data with Fintraffic ANS and the parties will together explore how to support airlines in their bid to drive down and meet new lower emissions targets.

As part of its industry-leading commitment to sustainability, Finnair is committed to halving its net CO2 emissions by the end of 2025 and achieving carbon neutrality in 2045.

Finnair pilot, Captain Tom Hakala, is in charge of fuel efficiency of Finnair flight operations and advises how Finnair pilots can maximize their fuel-efficient flying techniques.

Captain Hakala said: “Reducing the CO2 emissions of our flight operations is our number one environmental target, and we work for this on every single flight.

“Through this welcome partnership, we will now start sharing openly our fuel data and the impact air navigation services’ actions have on fuel consumption. Together with Fintraffic ANS we can explore new ways of further reducing the amount of fuel we use and the environmental impact of flying upon the environment.

“Our vision is that Finland has the safest, smoothest and most environmentally friendly airspace in the world. Every day, we focus on making air traffic as optimized as possible. Flight route optimization, continuous descent approach and close international cooperation are our means of reducing emissions”, says Pasi Nikama, Fintraffic ANS CCO.

“Air navigation services must also take into account the requirements of the environmental permit for aircraft noise management. Close cooperation with Finnair gives us new information and ways to develop Finnish air traffic to be even more environmentally efficient”.

Reducing a flight’s fuel consumption starts by planning the route to be as efficient as possible. During the flight, measures include minimizing time and unnecessary stops in taxiing, using continuous climb and descent during take-off and landing. Other considerations include optimizing the flight route, speed and altitude taking into account the weather conditions. In Finland, the airspace can be very efficiently used, which was also highlighted by Eurocontrol’s study last year.

In November 2020, Finnair and Fintraffic ANS explored the possibilities for minimizing fuel consumption with two test flights flown from Helsinki to Kittilä and Ivalo.

On the test flights, the flight time, flight length, fuel consumption and CO2 emissions were measured, and data comparison was made between the optimal plan and the realized flight. The flights showed several factors, such as weather conditions and other air space users, affected the possibility to optimize fuel consumption.

”Fuel efficiency is impacted by many factors, and even small actions make a difference, when they are repeated on thousands of flights per year”, says Tom Hakala.

On Wednesday 17 February Finnair will fly from Helsinki to Kittilä in Northern Finland, and the different phases of the flight and their impact on fuel consumption are followed on Finnair’s Instagram and Twitter accounts.

More on the Finnair blog:

WHAT WOULD A PERFECTLY FUEL EFFICIENT FLIGHT LOOK LIKE?

Carbon emissions caused by fuel burn form an airline’s biggest environmental impact. That’s why one of the most important ways to decrease the environmental impact of aviation is to improve fuel efficiency. Finnair has been investing in this for years.

Finnair A320

“During every flight, we make several decisions that impact fuel consumption. Even decisions that might appear small have a large impact when they’re repeated on thousands of flights every year” says Tom Hakala, who’s the technical lead responsible for the fuel efficiency of Finnair’s flight operations.

On 17 February at 1pm Finnair will, in cooperation with Fintraffic ANS, fly from Helsinki to Kittilä to test how much fuel consumption can be decreased when we strive to optimize all parts of the flight for fuel efficiency.

Fuel efficiency will be considered, for example, by choosing a fuel efficient route, optimizing the load and weight of the aircraft and minimizing queuing and unnecessary stops during taxiing, as well as using the airspace efficiently.

The flight will utilize biofuel bought by Finnair’s customers through the Push for Change program since 2019. The biofuel won’t be used at Helsinki airport, as Finnair’s biofuel is manufactured in California and it wouldn’t be sustainable to transport it to Finland. Instead, San Francisco airport will receive biofuel equalling 50% of the fuel consumption of Finnair’s HEL-KTT flight. According to the industry standard practice, Finnair can claim the resulting emissions decrease.

BEST RESULT THROUGH COLLABORATION

The best fuel efficiency is achieved through tight collaboration by the teams working at air traffic control, the airport and airline.

“It’s crucial that the organizations actively share data with each other. When all parties know the same things, we can make decisions that lead to bigger emissions decrease than if everyone just optimized their own area”, says Finnair’s VP of Sustainability, Anne Larilahti.

“The pandemic is an opportunity. When there’s less traffic, it’s easier to do things as planned.”

Fuel efficiency is optimized at the following stages of the flight.

BEFORE THE FLIGHT

Finnair’s routes are as fuel efficient as possible. We usually aim to fly to the destination the shortest possible route, considering the weather. Turning away from the route for a few minutes can burn hundreds of kilos more fuel. Having said that, the most direct route isn’t always the most energy efficient. Sometimes the wind is against you, and you can achieve better fuel efficiency by flying a slightly longer route.

FUELING

Finnair’s Pilot Briefing Fuel Dashboard is a flight preparation tool used by our pilots. It produces data to support the pilots’ fueling decisions. The captain makes fueling decisions based on the flight plan and their own consideration. There’s always enough fuel, and some disruptions like landing on another airport or a go-around are considered.

LOADING

The lighter the plane, the less fuel it burns. Catering and water are optimized according to passenger numbers. The centre of gravity of the aircraft should be as far back as possible, considering restrictions, to minimize the aerodynamic drag and thus increase fuel efficiency.

DE-ICING

Pilots determine the need for de-icing visually before departure. If the weather conditions require anti-icing, Finnair pilots take advantage of the SureApp application to consider which level of anti-icing provides appropriate weather protection for takeoff. Precise decisions enable a decrease in de-icing treatment time, burned fuel (as the engines are running for that time) and environmental effects.

TAXIING

The aircraft will usually taxi out for departure and in after landing with one engine in Helsinki. The CDM production control system at Helsinki airport gives departing planes their own time window, so they don’t need to queue or make unnecessary stops. Taxiing with one engine at departure will save on average 100kg of fuel in the A350 aircraft.

TAKEOFF

Accurate departure is important. Passengers can have an impact on this by being on time for their flight. Sometimes we need to wait for transfer customers from other flights, and the delay of one arriving flight can impact several departures. This can increase fuel burn: catching up the lost minutes by flying faster is expensive. Catching up every minute lost on the ground burns on average 100kg of fuel.

ROUTE

Pilots can optimize fuel burn by adjusting altitude and speed. The Finnair A350 aircraft are equipped with a program that calculates an optimal flight profile for fuel efficiency based on speed and altitude.

Wind impacts fuel consumption, so we aim to fly with favorable winds. When the wind is favourable, fuel burn will decrease without losing speed. It’s not always worth it to get to the destination as fast as possible. Flying slowly – when possible – can save fuel considerably. Collaboration with air traffic control is a vital part for optimizing fuel efficiency.

LANDING

The most fuel-efficient way to land is the continuous descent approach. Over 90% of the approaches by Finnair to Helsinki-Vantaa airport are made with a continuous descent, in which the altitude is continuously decreased from the cruising level to the landing runway without level flight segments. Level flight requires more engine thrust, thus increasing fuel consumption and noise.

THE PASSENGERS’ ROLE

Every customer can impact fuel efficiency. It’s important to be on time at the airport and at the gate, so the flight can depart on time. The amount of baggage also plays a role. Will you pack three pairs of shoes, or just two? Will you pack a full size shampoo, or a small travel size bottle? If every Finnair customer had had 1kg less baggage in 2019, the fuel saved could have been used for 20 flights from Helsinki to Tokyo.

Finnair aircraft photo gallery:

Finnair aircraft slide show:

Finnair to dismantle and recycle an Airbus A319 aircraft at Helsinki Airport

Finnair intends to dismantle and recycle an Airbus A319 aircraft, which has reached the end of its economic lifecycle at 21 years. The dismantling will begin at Helsinki Airport, where Finnair’s mechanics will remove parts that can be used elsewhere in Finnair’s fleet. These include the engine, seats, landing gear and avionics components.

“This is the first time that a Finnair aircraft is dismantled and recycled in Finland. We made the decision to take the plane apart at our home hub to optimize sustainability and economics”, says Juha Ojala, Vice President of Finnair’s Technical Operations. “This project allows us to improve the cost efficiency of maintenance operations and employ our mechanics during the pandemic when their normal workload has decreased.”

Before this, Finnair’s aircraft have been recycled elsewhere in Europe when they’ve reached the end of their lifecycle. Most companies that do this type of work are located in dry zones, where the climate is favorable for long-term storage of aircraft. This is the first time that a commercial aircraft will be dismantled in Finland. It’s an unusual project for Finnair, as it’s different from the company’s normal maintenance work, especially when it comes to planning and project management.

Aircraft have a pre-determined maximum service goal, as the body of the aircraft can only handle a set number of pressurizations. After this, the aircraft needs to be taken out of use in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. The recyclability of the aircraft and its parts is considered already at the design phase. As much as 98% of a new aircraft can be reused and recycled. With older aircraft, like the A319, about 90% can be reused.

“Many parts of the plane that will be dismantled – like landing gear, engines, the auxiliary power unit and avionics – can be utilized in Finnair’s maintenance operations, which supports both sustainability as well as cost efficiency,” Juha Ojala explains. “The parts that will be reused will be carefully inspected and overhauled. Smaller elements, like seat covers or cabin curtains, can also be reused.”

More from the Finnair blog:

Finnair is no stranger to recycling its old planes sustainably, ensuring parts can be reused and waste is kept to a minimum.

Finnair engineer works on a plane to be recycled

Just last year an Airbus A319-112, part of the A32S fleet, was sent to the Cotswolds in England to be dismantled by our expert partners. And now, one of its sister aircraft, another A319, is about to undergo the same treatment. Except this time the recycling will be done on home soil.

“This will be the first commercial airliner to be recycled in Finland,” says Timo Rossi, Project Manager for Finnair Technical Operations. It’s all part of Finnair’s sustainability strategy, ensuring that older planes that have completed years of service can be taken apart safely and their parts reused.

Finnair engineer assesses plane to be recycled

GETTING TO WORK

Taking apart the A319, which has flown a massive 54,710 hours across 32,966 flights over a period of 21 years, is a big job. One that starts at Helsinki Airport.

“It’s going to be done in three parts,” says Timo, explaining the process. “Finnair is going to remove bigger components such as the wings, engines, landing gears, auxiliary power unit (APU). Then a couple of hundred other parts will be taken off for eventual use in our active flying fleet.” This work is completed under Part 145 aircraft maintenance approvals, a European standard for companies involved in aircraft maintenance.

Once the component removals have been done by Finnair staff at Helsinki Airport, the remaining parts of the aircraft will be transported to an external partner for further dismantling.

“We’ve calculated the component removals will take roughly eight weeks,” says Timo. “At Helsinki Airport it will take around a day to cut off the wings and the tail to get the aircraft transported to the final recycling location. The current plan is to start in the middle of February, with the work of our partner finishing in late March or early April.”

SUSTAINABILITY THE GOAL

Once the aircraft has been fully dismantled, the parts that are leftover will form a vital part of Finnair’s future, says Timo.

“As an airline, our plan is to reuse as many parts as possible. Our partner will be able to recycle more than 90 percent of the remaining aircraft, maybe 95 percent. The exact numbers will be more clear once the work is done. They’re able to recycle nearly all of it. They have already said that the waste from the aircraft will be really minor.”

“Components and parts from all over the aircraft will be reused depending on our needs at the time. All parts will be carefully inspected and if necessary, repaired. Landing gears can be installed on another aircraft as those have been recently overhauled. And the APU is going to be reused too, as well as a lot of avionics components. We are storing the  parts in our own stock, so that gives us more flexibility to support the rest of our fleet going forward.”

Finnair engineer inspects plane to be recycled

A FIRST FOR FINLAND

Choosing to recycle this A319 in Finland has allowed Finnair to utilize the expertise of its maintenance staff and lay plans for future recycling of its fleet too.

“There have been a lot of bad effects from Covid, but the pandemic has given us an opportunity to do this for the first time [in Finland],” says Timo. “It gives quite a lot of workload to our employees, because their current workload has decreased compared with this time last year. Now we have resources that we are able to use.”

Timo says that all of this effort is a test to see if Finnair can recycle an aircraft at home, rather than having to fly them to other countries to get the job done. He and his team will have a clearer idea of the entire process once the work is done.

“We need to get through this, to put everything on paper and see what the numbers are. What is the benefit we are getting out of it? The sustainability and environmental point of view needs to be thought through too.”

Finnair aircraft photo gallery:
Finnair aircraft slide show:

Finnair re-starts passenger flights from the UK and Ireland to Finland

Finnair has made this announcement:

Finnair will re-start passenger flights from the UK and Ireland to Finland as of 25 January 2021, following the decision by the Finnish traffic authority, Traficom, to allow passenger flights from these countries.

In line with the recommendation by the Finnish Institute of Health and Welfare, Finnair will also from 28 January onwards require that passengers present a certificate of a negative COVID-19 test result, or a certificate of a previous COVID-19 infection if they travel on any Finnair flight to Finland. This requirement does not apply to customers transferring at Helsinki Airport for their international connecting flights. The certificate requirement is in force until further notice.

The new test certificate requirement by Finnair does not change the procedures by the local health authorities upon arrival in Finland. All passengers arriving at Helsinki Airport from abroad are directed to COVID-19 testing.

Finnair communicates the new requirement to its customers in all customer communications channels. Finnair staff will check the test certificate or other certificate at check-in or at the gate, and failure to provide the required document will result in boarding being denied. Customers can then postpone their travel by contacting Finnair.

Winter Operations at HEL:

Finnair introduces one-way ticket fares for its flights within Europe

Finnair has made this announcement:

Finnair brings customers more choice and flexibility by introducing a new, one-way fare structure for its intra-Europe and domestic flights from January 12, 2021. One-way tickets with competitive fares are now available for all Finnair intra-Europe and domestic flights in all purchase channels.

Finnair will continue all its safe travel measures in 2021 and revises them on a regular basis. For example, using a mask is still required for all customers and crew at the airport and onboard flights.

Starting in 2021, Finnair is also extending active Finnair Plus tier tracking periods by 6 months for all members. On top of that, Finnair has frozen the expiration of Finnair Plus award points, meaning no points will expire before the end of August 2021.

Related story: Recycling an airplane: What’s scrapped when an aircraft retires?

From CNN.

Finnair’s traffic drops 92% in December, cargo improves

Finnair has issued this report:

In December, Finnair carried 92,500 passengers, which was 92.0% less than in the corresponding period of 2019 but 8.8% more than in November 2020. The COVID-19 impact, including the exceptionally strict travel restrictions imposed by Finland, still affected all passenger traffic figures. It was visible especially in the North Atlantic figures (no scheduled flights in December).

The overall capacity measured in Available Seat Kilometres (ASK) decreased in December by 90.1% year-on-year. Finnair operated 75 daily flights (cargo-only included) on average which was 21.5% compared to December 2019. The differences between capacity figures are explained by the shorter operated flights on average and by smaller operated aircraft compared to December 2019. Finnair’s traffic measured in Revenue Passenger Kilometres (RPKs) decreased by 96.1%. The Passenger Load Factor (PLF) decreased by 47.1% points to 30.1%.

The ASK decline in Asian traffic was 89.5%. The North Atlantic capacity decreased by 100.0%. In European traffic, the ASKs were down by 91.3%. The ASKs in domestic traffic decreased by 73.8%.

RPKs decreased in Asian traffic by 98.3%, in North Atlantic traffic by 100.0%, in European traffic by 94.3% and in domestic traffic by 79.4%.

The PLF was 12.4% in Asian traffic but it was supported by the strong cargo operations and a high cargo load factor. The PLF was 50.0% in European traffic and 52.2% in domestic traffic, whereas there was no PLF figure in North Atlantic traffic due to zero passenger flights in December.

Passenger numbers decreased in Asian traffic by 98.3%, in North Atlantic traffic by 100.0%, in European traffic by 93.3% and in domestic traffic by 82.2%.

Available scheduled cargo tonne kilometres decreased by 87.1% year-on-year and revenue scheduled cargo tonne kilometres decreased by 81.0%, both due to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on scheduled flights. However, cargo related available tonne kilometres decreased by 61.6% and revenue tonne kilometres only by 42.4% as they both include also the cargo-only flights operated mainly between Europe and Asia as well as Europe and North America. Cargo-only tonnes were down by 13.4% and the total cargo tonnes by 12.2% from November 2020 due to softer demand during the holiday season. Despite it, strong demand for the cargo capacity especially in Asia continued. As a result, the cargo load factor was clearly higher than in the corresponding period of 2019.

In December, 89.3% of all Finnair flights arrived on schedule (81.4%).

Traffic statistics for January 2021 will be published on Friday 5 February 2021.

Finnair Traffic Performance December 2020
Month % Change YTD % Change
Total traffic
Passengers 1,000 92.5 -92.0 3,485.6 -76.2
Available seat kilometres mill 387.9 -90.1 12,937.5 -72.6
Revenue passenger kilometres mill 116.9 -96.1 8,150.0 -78.8
Passenger load factor % 30.1 -47.1p 63.0 -18.7p
Cargo tonnes total 6,809.4 -50.7 71,732.8 -58.6
Available tonne kilometres mill 136.5 -76.4 2,436.5 -64.8
Revenue tonne kilometres mill 59.6 -83.2 1,213.6 -73.3
Asia
Passengers 1,000 Asia 3.5 -98.3 501.3 -80.4
Available seat kilometres mill Asia 208.4 -89.5 6,155.9 -73.6
Revenue passenger kilometres mill Asia 25.9 -98.3 3,837.7 -80.1
Passenger load factor % Asia 12.4 -65.3p 62.3 -20.6p
Europe
Passengers 1,000 Europe 45.2 -93.3 2,033.2 -78.1
Available seat kilometres mill Europe 121.2 -91.3 5,061.1 -71.7
Revenue passenger kilometres mill Europe 60.6 -94.3 3,140.5 -78.3
Passenger load factor % Europe 50.0 -27.3p 62.1 -18.8p
North Atlantic
Passengers 1,000 North Atlantic 0.0 -100.0 82.3 -82.0
Available seat kilometres mill North Atlantic 0.0 -100.0 848.9 -79.1
Revenue passenger kilometres mill North Atlantic 0.0 -100.0 647.1 -81.4
Passenger load factor % North Atlantic N/A N/A 76.2 -9.1p
Domestic
Passengers 1,000 Domestic 43.8 -82.2 868.8 -63.4
Available seat kilometres mill Domestic 58.2 -73.8 871.5 -54.7
Revenue passenger kilometres mill Domestic 30.4 -79.4 524.7 -58.4
Passenger load factor % Domestic 52.2 -14.2p 60.2 -5.4p
Cargo Traffic
Europe tonnes 243.0 -92.4 9,067.6 -74.2
North Atlantic tonnes 0.0 -100.0 2,542.2 -81.3
Asia tonnes 2,095.5 -78.3 33,746.9 -72.8
Domestic tonnes 31.2 -15.0 340.3 -40.5
Cargo scheduled traffic total tonnes 2,369.7 -82.8 45,697.0 -73.6
Cargo flights, tonnes** 4,439.7 100.0 26,035.8 100.0
Cargo Traffic tonnes total 6,809.4 -50.7 71,732.8 -58.6
Available tonne kilometres* mill 58.2 -61.6 718.8 -61.6
Revenue tonne kilometres mill 49.3 -42.4 485.4 -55.6
Available sched. cargo tonne kms*, mill 19.6 -87.1 489.2 -73.9
Revenue sched. cargo tonne kms, mill 16.3 -81.0 293.2 -73.2
Cargo load factor* % 84.7 28.2p 67.5 9.1p
– North-Atlantic cargo load factor* % N/A N/A 66.3 10.2p
– Asia cargo load factor* % 87.0 26.4p 65.1 1.8p
Scheduled traffic Cargo load factor*, % 83.2 26.7p 59.9 1.6p

* Based on average operational cargo capacity

** Including purchased traffic

  • Change %: Change compared to the figures of the respective periods in the previous year (p = points).
  • Available seat kilometres. ASK: Total number of seats available. multiplied by the number of kilometres flown.
  • Revenue passenger kilometres. RPK: Number of revenue passengers carried. multiplied by kilometres flown.
  • Passenger load factor: Share of revenue passenger kilometres of available seat kilometres.
  • Available tonne kilometres. ATK: Number of tonnes of capacity for carriage of passengers. cargo and mail. multiplied by kilometres flown.
  • Revenue tonne kilometres. RTK: Total revenue load consisting of passengers. cargo and mail. multiplied by kilometres flown.
  • Overall load factor: Share of revenue tonne kilometres of available tonne kilometres.

Finnair has been granted credit support in excess of 100 million euros

Finnair has made this announcement:

As a part of Finnair’s rebuild program, the company has been granted export credit support in excess of 100 million euros from the export credit agencies of Germany, France and the United Kingdom. Credit support has been offered to qualified purchasers of Airbus aircraft and, in this case, it has been granted for the Airbus A350-900 aircraft that was delivered to Finnair in September 2020. Finnair has mandated JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., London Branch to arrange the financing.

Finnair has ordered a total of 19 new A350-900 XWB aircraft from Airbus, of which 16 have been delivered as of September 1, 2020.

Finnair aircraft photo gallery:

Finnair aircraft slide show:

First-ever Finnair virtual reality flight to see Santa delivers some magic this festive season

Finnair made this announcement:

Families will soon be able to fly with Finnair to see Santa in Lapland, thanks to the magic of virtual reality (VR). From 25 December, Finnair will offer eight ‘flights’ using virtual reality to transport lucky families and children to visit Santa in his hometown of Rovaniemi.

Finnair, which is Santa’s official airline, is using VR to offer customers an immersive 360-degree experience. The flights are created by Finnish VR studio Zoan with one of the most advanced real-time 3D graphics tools, Unreal Engine. Virtual customers can enjoy a flight on their mobile phones or laptops where they will experience the thrill of sitting in Finnair’s comfortable Nordic Business Class. You can also use a VR headset that can access a web browser and open a video.

You can enjoy refreshments served by cabin crew, admire the starry skies and gaze upon the dramatic northern lights from your ‘seat’. The VR experience will also offer familiar flight soundscapes, festive decorations and perhaps even the glimpse of a familiar festive figure sitting in one of the other seats! After landing in the wintry city of Rovaniemi, customers will be able to cross the Arctic Circle and enter Santa’s cabin to meet Santa Claus himself.

Each of the eight VR flights to Lapland lasts about thirty minutes and costs just €10 per person. Seats can be reserved from the Finnair Shop. Besides experiencing something wonderfully festive, lucky customers who board the virtual flight will also be giving something towards those who are less fortunate and need help. All proceeds will go to supporting UNICEF’s work to slow the spread of Covid-19 and minimize the pandemic’s impact on children worldwide.

Mikko Turtiainen, Finnair VP of Global Sales, said: “Thanks to the magic of Virtual Reality, Finnair can ‘fly’ families to Rovaniemi in Lapland – despite the travel restrictions – to enjoy a winter wonderland and meet Santa. I hope this brings a big smile to those participating.”

“As Santa’s official airline, we’re excited to harness modern technology to create a truly memorable holiday experience. Our customers around the world will be able to enjoy the timeless wonder and holiday cheer of Finnish Lapland from the comfort of their own homes, while enjoying the thrill of sitting in Finnair Business Class. We hope it will inspire them to travel again once the time is right.”

Sanna Kärkkäinen, CEO of Visit Rovaniemi, said: “The time could not be better for a holiday VR experience on the wings of Santa’s official airline. We’ve been developing our VR experience in Rovaniemi for over a year now and joining forces with Finnair is a fantastic way to reach a global audience with a seasonal message – and a heart full of hope.”

The lack of high-quality content offerings has been one of the biggest barriers to mainstream adoption of VR technologies, but Finnair has been pioneering VR since 2016. It first used VR to showcase its Airbus A350 cabin experience at industry events with specially provided headsets.

The Covid-19 pandemic acted as a catalyst to speed up the adoption of virtual experiences among consumers. As people have become more comfortable with virtual reality, Finnair has been able to demonstrate through the VR flight concept that mainstream virtual events can go beyond simple online meetings or videos to create a more meaningful and engaging experience.

Tiina Tissari, VP of Customer Experience and Products at Finnair, said: “We think VR is an important tool which could be used to complement the physical in-flight experience. Customers could, for instance, choose their holiday destination or make travel plans by checking out sights and locations through VR. We also believe the in-flight experience will become more personalised so that customers can customise and enhance their journey to fit their individual needs and preferences. VR could also be a valuable tool here.”

The flight is only available in English. Read more about the virtual Finnair flight to see Santa on Blue Wings online.

Finnair aircraft photo gallery:

Finnair aircraft slide show:

Finnair defers three Airbus A350 deliveries, traffic is down 92% in October

Finnair made this announcement:

Finnair has concluded an agreement with Airbus that the deliveries of the remaining three committed A350-900 aircraft will be postponed, as anticipated in connection with the announcement of the Q3 results. The agreement is a part of Finnair’s comprehensive measures to ensure that the company can emerge from the COVID-19 pandemic as a strong airline. The aircraft were originally scheduled for delivery from Q2 2021 to Q2 2022, and on average, the new delivery dates for the aircraft will be 24 months later than originally scheduled.

As a result of the deferrals, Finnair’s cash flow from investing activities will be approximately 200 million euros less in 2021.

“Finnair has been in intensive negotiations with all of its suppliers during the COVID-19 pandemic, seeking to reduce expenditures in order to support our ramp-up plans when traffic recovers. This agreement will give us more flexibility to deploy the existing fleet more efficiently and improve cash flow”, says Christine Rovelli, Senior Vice President, Finance and Fleet Management at Finnair.

Finnair has ordered a total of 19 new A350-900 XWB aircraft from Airbus, of which 16 have now been delivered.

On the traffic side, in October, Finnair carried 100,800 passengers, which is 92.0% less than in the corresponding period of 2019 and 12.8% less than in September 2020. The COVID-19 impact, including the exceptionally strict travel restrictions imposed by Finland, still affected all passenger traffic figures. It was visible especially in the North Atlantic figures (no scheduled flights in October).

The overall capacity measured in Available Seat Kilometres (ASK) decreased in October by 88.5% year-on-year. Finnair operated 76 daily flights (cargo-only included) on average which was 21.1% compared to October 2019. The differences between capacity figures are explained by the shorter operated flights on average and by smaller operated aircraft compared to October 2019. Finnair’s traffic measured in Revenue Passenger Kilometres (RPKs) decreased by 95.6%. The Passenger Load Factor (PLF) decreased by 50.7% points to 31.6%.

The ASK decline in Asian traffic was 86.6%. The North Atlantic capacity decreased by 100.0%. In European traffic, the ASKs were down by 90.2%. The ASKs in domestic traffic decreased by 66.3%.

RPKs decreased in Asian traffic by 96.9%, in North Atlantic traffic by 100.0%, in European traffic by 94.7% and in domestic traffic by 71.4%.

The PLF was 19.2% in Asian traffic but it was supported by the cargo operations and a very high cargo load factor. The PLF was 45.0% in European traffic and 59.6% in domestic traffic, whereas there was no PLF figure in North Atlantic traffic due to zero passenger flights in October.

Passenger numbers decreased in Asian traffic by 96.9%, in North Atlantic traffic by 100.0%, in European traffic by 93.5% and in domestic traffic by 78.2%.

Available scheduled cargo tonne kilometres decreased by 87.4% year-on-year and revenue scheduled cargo tonne kilometres decreased by 81.9%, both due to the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on scheduled flights. However, cargo related available tonne kilometres decreased by 76.7% and revenue tonne kilometres decreased by 65.3% and they both include also the cargo-only flights operated between Europe and Asia as well as Europe and North America. The total cargo tonnes were up by 26.1% from September 2020 due to continued strong demand for the cargo capacity. As a result, the cargo load factor was still clearly higher than in the corresponding period of 2019.

In October, 94.7% of all Finnair flights arrived on schedule (82.4%).

Traffic statistics for November 2020 will be published on Tuesday 8 December 2020.

Finnair Traffic Performance October 2020
Month % Change YTD % Change
Total traffic
Passengers 1,000 100.8 -92.0 3,308.1 -73.3
Available seat kilometres mill 464.9 -88.5 12,146.9 -69.4
Revenue passenger kilometres mill 147.1 -95.6 7,930.9 -75.8
Passenger load factor % 31.6 -50.7p 65.3 -17.2p
Cargo tonnes total 5,037.4 -70.0 57,163.8 -60.5
Available tonne kilometres mill 117.3 -80.3 2,146.9 -63.0
Revenue tonne kilometres mill 49.5 -87.7 1,088.4 -71.7
Asia
Passengers 1,000 Asia 6.8 -96.9 494.8 -77.2
Available seat kilometres mill Asia 264.7 -86.6 5,725.1 -70.7
Revenue passenger kilometres mill Asia 50.7 -96.9 3,788.6 -76.9
Passenger load factor % Asia 19.2 -63.6p 66.2 -17.7p
Europe
Passengers 1,000 Europe 53.4 -93.5 1,947.4 -75.5
Available seat kilometres mill Europe 156.7 -90.2 4,808.9 -68.3
Revenue passenger kilometres mill Europe 70.5 -94.7 3,028.1 -75.5
Passenger load factor % Europe 45.0 -37.6p 63.0 -18.6p
North Atlantic
Passengers 1,000 North Atlantic 0.0 -100.0 82.3 -78.9
Available seat kilometres mill North Atlantic 0.0 -100.0 848.9 -75.0
Revenue passenger kilometres mill North Atlantic 0.0 -100.0 647.1 -78.1
Passenger load factor % North Atlantic N/A N/A 76.2 -10.5p
Domestic
Passengers 1,000 Domestic 40.6 -78.2 783.6 -59.1
Available seat kilometres mill Domestic 43.5 -66.3 764.0 -50.1
Revenue passenger kilometres mill Domestic 25.9 -71.4 467.1 -53.4
Passenger load factor % Domestic 59.6 -10.4p 61.1 -4.2p
Cargo Traffic
Europe tonnes 284.2 -92.1 8,543.4 -70.2
North Atlantic tonnes 0.0 -100.0 2,542.2 -77.8
Asia tonnes 2,436.2 -79.3 29,331.8 -71.8
Domestic tonnes 28.5 -41.0 278.9 -43.5
Cargo scheduled traffic total tonnes 2,748.9 -83.6 40,696.3 -71.9
Cargo flights, tonnes** 2,288.5 100.0 16,467.5 100.0
Cargo Traffic tonnes total 5,037.4 -70.0 57,163.8 -60.5
Available tonne kilometres* mill 37.9 -76.7 596.8 -62.1
Revenue tonne kilometres mill 36.4 -65.3 379.5 -58.5
Available sched. cargo tonne kms*, mill 20.6 -87.4 448.8 -71.5
Revenue sched. cargo tonne kms, mill 19.0 -81.9 258.8 -71.7
Cargo load factor* % 96.0 31.6p 63.6 5.4p
– North-Atlantic cargo load factor* % N/A N/A 66.3 10.0p
– Asia cargo load factor* % 96.1 26.1p 62.6 -0.4p
Scheduled traffic Cargo load factor*, % 92.3 27.9p 57.7 -0.5p

* Based on average operational cargo capacity

** Including purchased traffic

  • Change %: Change compared to the figures of the respective periods in the previous year (p = points).
  • Available seat kilometres. ASK: Total number of seats available. multiplied by the number of kilometres flown.
  • Revenue passenger kilometres. RPK: Number of revenue passengers carried. multiplied by kilometres flown.
  • Passenger load factor: Share of revenue passenger kilometres of available seat kilometres.
  • Available tonne kilometres. ATK: Number of tonnes of capacity for carriage of passengers. cargo and mail. multiplied by kilometres flown.
  • Revenue tonne kilometres. RTK: Total revenue load consisting of passengers. cargo and mail. multiplied by kilometres flown.
  • Overall load factor: Share of revenue tonne kilometres of available tonne kilometres.

Finnair currently operates flights to some 50 destinations in Europe and Asia. Despite lower frequencies than our regular service, both leisure and business travellers can still fly with our available connections. Transfers at Helsinki for long-haul flights to Asia are fast and convenient as usual. Read more about which destinations you can travel with our network.

Finnair_Globe_new_network_cropped-5.18

OUR CURRENT AND UPCOMING ROUTES*

Destinations in Finland

  • Ivalo
  • Joensuu
  • Jyväskylä
  • Kajaani
  • Kemi
  • Kittilä
  • Kokkola
  • Kuopio
  • Kuusamo
  • Mariehamn
  • Oulu
  • Rovaniemi
  • Vaasa

Destinations in Europe

  • Alanya
  • Amsterdam
  • Berlin
  • Brussels
  • Budapest
  • Copenhagen
  • Dublin
  • Düsseldorf
  • Edinburgh
  • Frankfurt
  • Gothenburg
  • Hamburg
  • London
  • Manchester
  • Milan
  • Munich
  • Málaga
  • Oslo
  • Paris
  • Prague
  • Riga
  • Rome
  • Stockholm
  • Tallinn
  • Vienna
  • Warsaw
  • Zurich

Destinations in Asia

  • Hong Kong
  • Nanjing
  • Seoul
  • Shanghai
  • Tokyo (Narita)

Destinations in the United States

  • No flights scheduled in the upcoming months

*Please note that the destinations listed are subject to change. 

Finnair aircraft photo gallery:

Finnair offers complimentary coronavirus insurance cover

Finnair is offering complimentary COVID-19 insurance cover for customers departing from Finland for the first time.

Finnair Corona Cover, which launches today, provides extra protection and security for customers for all existing and new bookings, for travel departures between November 3, 2020 and March 31, 2021.

The new insurance cover comes complimentary with all Finnair tickets booked through Finnair sales channels – including Finnair.com, the Finnair mobile app or via the airline’s customer service – for international travel originating from Finland, ensuring extra peace of mind for the airline’s customers.

It means any customer who falls ill with coronavirus in their destination can claim for any coronavirus-related medical and quarantine expenses incurred in their destination. The cover supplements travellers’ own travel insurance.

Tiina Tissari, Finnair Vice President, Customer Experience and Products, said: “It is important that Finnair customers feel they can travel safely as we recognise that travelling during the pandemic comes with new kinds of concerns and challenges.

“To meet the needs of our customers during the COVID-19 outbreak, Finnair has introduced its complimentary Finnair Corona Cover.

“Now Finnair customers can enjoy the peace of mind and additional security which comes from Finnair Corona Cover, including cover for medical and quarantine expenses should those insured with us become sick with coronavirus while travelling.”

Finnair Corona Cover includes the following expenses for customers in their destination:

  • COVID-19 related medical expenses and medical repatriation up to €50,000, e.g. for a hospital stay or doctor visits
  • The price of a coronavirus test, if the result is positive
  • Additional quarantine costs, resulting from falling ill with coronavirus, up to €100 for a maximum of 14 days, which could cover additional overnight accommodation
  • A new return flight back to Finland, if the original flight is missed due to illness related to coronavirus.

The cover is valid in all foreign destinations, with no excess fees.

As well as including Finnair Corona Cover with all Finnair tickets booked from Finland, the cover is included also in Aurinkomatkat package trips and Finnair Holidays bookings, when the destination is outside Finland.

Customers are advised to always contact Finnair’s insurance partner for a consultation and approval for any medical or other expenses, before using local services. Expenses will be settled directly with local service providers, provided each customer first contacts and is given approval from the insurance partner. This prevents customers from having to pay for the services themselves or carry any risk for the costs.

The service is provided to Finnair customers, 24/7, with English-speaking customer service agents on hand to provide assistance.

Finnair Cargo is ready for the COVID-19 vaccine challenge

Finnair Cargo is preparing to carry COVID-19 vaccines. Several pharmaceutical companies have stated they are in the latter stages of testing a vaccine for Covid-19, suggesting it is time to start planning the supply chain. It is anticipated that air cargo will be one of the main forms of transportation.

Finnair Cargo was the first airline in the world to receive IATA’s CEIV Pharma certificate in 2015.

For the logistics chain, there is not yet publicly available information on the exact requirements for transporting vaccines.

Finnair Cargo has partnered with all major active container manufacturers to further ensure the safe transportation of the vaccines.

Finnair aircraft photo gallery: