Category Archives: Lion Air

Indonesian investigators blame a series of mistakes for the crash of Lion Air 610

Delivered August 13, 2018, crashed into the Java Sea on October 29, 2018

National Transportation Safety Committee (NTSC) of Indonesia has issued their final report on the crash of Lion Air flight 610.

The investigators faulted Boeing, Lion Air and the pilots for the tragic crash.

The report criticized the purchase of the critical sensor from a Florida repair shop that had not been properly tested and calibrated.

The report spotlighted 9 things that contributed to the accident.

Reliance on the single angle-of-attack sensor made MCAS more vulnerable to failure.

Read more from the BBC.

Boeing issued this response to the report:

Boeing Statement On Lion Air Flight 610 Investigation Final Report.

Boeing issued the following statement regarding the release of the final investigation report of Lion Air Flight 610 by Indonesia’s National Transportation Safety Committee (KNKT):

“On behalf of everyone at Boeing, I want to convey our heartfelt condolences to the families and loved ones of those who lost their lives in these accidents. We mourn with Lion Air, and we would like to express our deepest sympathies to the Lion Air family,” said Boeing President & CEO Dennis Muilenburg. “These tragic events have deeply affected us all and we will always remember what happened.”

“We commend Indonesia’s National Transportation Safety Committee for its extensive efforts to determine the facts of this accident, the contributing factors to its cause and recommendations aimed toward our common goal that this never happens again.”

“We are addressing the KNKT’s safety recommendations, and taking actions to enhance the safety of the 737 MAX to prevent the flight control conditions that occurred in this accident from ever happening again. Safety is an enduring value for everyone at Boeing and the safety of the flying public, our customers, and the crews aboard our airplanes is always our top priority. We value our long-standing partnership with Lion Air and we look forward to continuing to work together in the future.”

Boeing experts, working as technical advisors to the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board, have supported the KNKT over the course of the investigation. The company’s engineers have been working with the US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and other global regulators to make software updates and other changes, taking into account the information from the KNKT’s investigation.

Since this accident, the 737 MAX and its software are undergoing an unprecedented level of global regulatory oversight, testing and analysis. This includes hundreds of simulator sessions and test flights, regulatory analysis of thousands of documents, reviews by regulators and independent experts and extensive certification requirements.

Over the past several months Boeing has been making changes to the 737 MAX. Most significantly, Boeing has redesigned the way Angle of Attack (AoA) sensors work with a feature of the flight control software known as Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System (MCAS). Going forward, MCAS will compare information from both AoA sensors before activating, adding a new layer of protection.

In addition, MCAS will now only turn on if both AoA sensors agree, will only activate once in response to erroneous AOA, and will always be subject to a maximum limit that can be overridden with the control column.

These software changes will prevent the flight control conditions that occurred in this accident from ever happening again.

In addition, Boeing is updating crew manuals and pilot training, designed to ensure every pilot has all of the information they need to fly the 737 MAX safely.

Boeing continues to work with the FAA and other regulatory agencies worldwide on the certification of the software update and training program to safely return the 737 MAX to service.

Top Copyright Photo: Lion Air (PT Lion Mentari Airlines) Boeing 737-8 MAX 8 PK-LQP (msn 43000) BFI (James Helbock). Image: 944189.

 

 

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The Lion Air families are briefed on the Boeing 737 MAX crash by Indonesian authorities

From Reuters:

Mechanical and design issues contributed to the crash of a Lion Air 737 MAX jet according to Reuters reporting on a briefing by Indonesian investigators for the victims’ families ahead of the release of the report.

A final report will be released on Friday.

Read the full Reuters report.

Lion Air becomes first A330neo operator in the Asia-Pacific region

Airbus has made this announcement:

Lion Air has received its first Airbus A330-900, becoming the first airline from the Asia-Pacific region to fly the A330neo. The aircraft is on lease from BOC Aviation and is the first of 10 A330neos set to join the airline’s fleet.

The A330neo will be used by Lion Air for nonstop long-haul services from Indonesia. These include pilgrimage flights from cities such as Makassar, Balikpapan and Surabaya to Jeddah and Medina in Saudi Arabia. The flight time for such routes can be up to 12 hours.

Lion Air’s A330-900 is configured for 436 passengers in a single-class configuration.

Photo: Airbus.

Boeing dedicates $50 million of pledged $100 million to near-term relief for families of the victims of the Lion Air flight 610 and Ethiopian Airlines flight 302 accidents

Boeing has made this announcement:

Boeing has announced that it has dedicated $50 million of a previously announced $100 million fund to provide near-term financial assistance to families of the victims of the Lion Air Flight 610 and Ethiopian Flight 302 accidents.

Boeing also announced that it has retained Kenneth Feinberg and Camille Biros, renowned experts in establishing and overseeing victims’ compensation funds, to design and administer the fund.

“The tragic loss of life in both accidents continues to weigh heavily on all of us at Boeing, and we have the utmost sympathy for the loved ones of those on board,” said Dennis Muilenburg, Boeing chairman, president and CEO. “Through our partnership with Feinberg and Biros, we hope affected families receive needed assistance as quickly and efficiently as possible.”

The $50 million fund represents the initial expenditure of a $100 million pledge by Boeing to address family and community needs of those affected by the accidents. All monies distributed by Mr. Feinberg and Ms. Biros will be independent from any resolution provided through the legal process.

“We are honored to take on this important assignment of providing needed financial relief to the families of these two tragedies,” added Kenneth Feinberg.

Co-Administrator Camille Biros continued, “We know how important it is to assist the families of the victims who have endured a personal tragedy and will work to design and administer the fund and distribute the money as efficiently and expeditiously as possible.”

Copyright Photo: Joe G. Walker.

Note: Meanwhile all of the Boeing 737 MAX airplanes in the world remain grounded and out of service.

Video: Rogue Boeing 737 Max planes ‘with minds of their own’

New video from 60 Minutes Australia:

Liz Hayes investigates the disaster of Boeing’s 737 MAX jetliner. Why two supposedly state-of-the-art and safe planes crashed killing 346 people; why pilots now fear flying the 737 MAX; and whether Boeing could have averted the catastrophes.

Boeing statement on AOA Disagree Alert

Boeing has issued this statement:

On every airplane delivered to our customers, including the MAX, all flight data and information needed to safely operate the aircraft is provided in the flight deck on the primary flight deck displays. This information is provided full-time in the pilots’ primary field of view, and it always has been.

Air speed, attitude, altitude, vertical speed, heading and engine power settings are the primary parameters the flight crews use to safely operate the airplane in normal flight. Stick shaker and the pitch limit indicator are the primary features used for the operation of the airplane at elevated angles of attack. All recommended pilot actions, checklists, and training are based upon these primary indicators. Neither the angle of attack indicator nor the AOA Disagree alert are necessary for the safe operation of the airplane. They provide supplemental information only, and have never been considered safety features on commercial jet transport airplanes.

The Boeing design requirements for the 737 MAX included the AOA Disagree alert as a standard, standalone feature, in keeping with Boeing’s fundamental design philosophy of retaining commonality with the 737NG. In 2017, within several months after beginning 737 MAX deliveries, engineers at Boeing identified that the 737 MAX display system software did not correctly meet the AOA Disagree alert requirements. The software delivered to Boeing linked the AOA Disagree alert to the AOA indicator, which is an optional feature on the MAX and the NG. Accordingly, the software activated the AOA Disagree alert only if an airline opted for the AOA indicator. 

When the discrepancy between the requirements and the software was identified, Boeing followed its standard process for determining the appropriate resolution of such issues. That review, which involved multiple company subject matter experts, determined that the absence of the AOA Disagree alert did not adversely impact airplane safety or operation. Accordingly, the review concluded, the existing functionality was acceptable until the alert and the indicator could be delinked in the next planned display system software update. Senior company leadership was not involved in the review and first became aware of this issue in the aftermath of the Lion Air accident.

Approximately a week after the Lion Air accident, on November 6, 2018, Boeing issued an Operations Manual Bulletin (OMB), which was followed a day later by the FAA’s issuance of an Airworthiness Directive (AD). In identifying the AOA Disagree alert as one among a number of indications that could result from erroneous AOA, both the OMB and the AD described the AOA Disagree alert feature as available only if the AOA indicator option is installed.

Image: Boeing.

Boeing discussed the status of the AOA Disagree alert with the FAA in the wake of the Lion Air accident. At that time, Boeing informed the FAA that Boeing engineers had identified the software issue in 2017 and had determined per Boeing’s standard process that the issue did not adversely impact airplane safety or operation. In December 2018, Boeing convened a Safety Review Board (SRB) to consider again whether the absence of the AOA Disagree alert from certain 737 MAX flight displays presented a safety issue. That SRB confirmed Boeing’s prior conclusion that it did not. Boeing shared this conclusion and the supporting SRB analysis with the FAA.

Boeing is issuing a display system software update, to implement the AOA Disagree alert as a standard, standalone feature before the MAX returns to service. When the MAX returns to service, all MAX production aircraft will have an activated and operable AOA Disagree alert and an optional angle of attack indicator. All customers with previously delivered MAX airplanes will have the ability to activate the AOA Disagree alert.

First Lion Air A330neo rolls-out of the Airbus paint shop

Airbus has made this announcement:

The first A330neo for Lion Air Group has rolled out of the Airbus paint shop in Toulouse, France, featuring the airline’s distinctive livery. The aircraft will be operated on lease from BOC Aviation.

Altogether, Lion Air Group will acquire 10 A330neo aircraft, eight of which will be leased from BOC Aviation. The aircraft will have a single-class layout seating 440 passengers and will be operated by Lion Air on selected domestic routes, as well as charter and pilgrimage service to Saudi Arabia. Some of the aircraft will be operated by Thai Lion on long-haul services from Thailand.

The first aircraft will now continue its industrial process and proceed soon to ground and flight tests, before the delivery to the airline in the coming weeks.

The A330neo is the true new-generation aircraft building on the best-selling widebody A330’s features and leveraging on A350 XWB technology. Powered by the latest Rolls-Royce Trent 7000 engines, the A330neo provides an unprecedented level of efficiency – with 25% lower fuel burn per seat than previous generation competitors. Equipped with the Airspace by Airbus cabin, the A330neo offers a unique passenger experience with more personal space and the latest generation in-flight entertainment system and connectivity.

Photo: Airbus.