Category Archives: Lion Air

Boeing statement on Lion Air flight 610 preliminary report

Delivered August 13, 2018, crashed into the Java Sea on October 29, 2018

Boeing issued this statement after the Indonesian government issued its preliminary report on the tragic crash of Lion Air flight 610 in the Java Sea:

The Boeing Company is deeply saddened by the loss of Lion Air Flight 610. We extend our heartfelt condolences and sympathies to the families and loved ones of those onboard.

Safety is a core value for everyone at Boeing and the safety of our airplanes, our customers’ passengers and their crews is always our top priority. As our customers and their passengers continue to fly the 737 MAX to hundreds of destinations around the world every day, they have our assurance that the 737 MAX is as safe as any airplane that has ever flown the skies.

Boeing appreciates Indonesia’s National Transportation Safety Committee (NTSC) for its ongoing efforts to investigate the causes of the accident. Boeing is taking every measure to fully understand all aspects of this accident, working closely with the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board as technical advisors to support the NTSC as the investigation continues.

Earlier today, the NTSC released its preliminary accident investigation report.  The report provides detailed accounts of Flight 610 and of the immediately preceding flight of the same aircraft.

The report explains that the maintenance logs for the accident aircraft recorded problems related to airspeed and altitude on each of the four flights that occurred over the three days prior to Flight 610. The logs indicate that various maintenance procedures were performed, but issues related to airspeed and altitude continued on each successive flight. The logs indicate that, among other procedures, on Oct. 27, two days prior to the incident flight, one of the airplane’s Angle of Attack (AOA) sensors was replaced.

On Oct. 28, before the flight immediately prior to Flight 610, the pilot in command and the maintenance engineer discussed the maintenance that had been performed on the aircraft. The engineer informed the pilot that the AOA sensor had been replaced and tested. The report does not include records as to the installation or calibration of the new sensor, nor does the report indicate whether the sensor was new or refurbished.  Although the report states that the pilot was satisfied by the information relayed by the engineer that the AOA sensor had been replaced and tested, on the subsequent flight the pilots again experienced problems with erroneous airspeed data, and also experienced automatic nose down trim.

The report states that the flight crew of the Oct. 28 flight turned off the stabilizer trim switches within minutes of experiencing the automatic nose down trim, and continued with manual trim through the end of the flight. The report further notes that the pilot performed three non-normal checklist procedures, including the runaway stabilizer non-normal checklist, which is a memory item prescribed by the 737 MAX Flight Crew Operations Manual, and reaffirmed in Boeing Flight Crew Operations Manual Bulletin TBC-19 and FAA Emergency Airworthiness Directive (AD) Number 2018-23-51, as the appropriate procedure to address unintended horizontal stabilizer movement, regardless of source.

The report indicates that the remainder of the Oct. 28 flight was uneventful and that the flight continued to its destination. The report also states that, after landing, the pilot reported some of the experienced issues both on the aircraft maintenance log and to engineering. The report states that the pilot ran the runaway stabilizer non-normal check list, but it does not state that he communicated that fact in the maintenance documentation following that flight.

The following day, Oct. 29, shortly after taking off, the pilots experienced issues with altitude and airspeed data that the pilots had previously experienced on the earlier flights, due to erroneous AOA data. Data from the flight data recorder summarized in the report also makes clear that, as on the previous flight, the airplane experienced automatic nose down trim. In response, the flight crew repeatedly commanded nose up trim. This sequence repeated for the remainder of the flight, during which the flight crew was able to maintain control of the airplane for approximately ten minutes. Unlike as is stated with respect to the prior flight, the report does not state whether the pilots performed the runaway stabilizer procedure or cut out the stabilizer trim switches.

In accordance with international protocol, all inquiries about the ongoing accident investigation must be directed to the NTSC.

Top Copyright Photo: Lion Air (PT Lion Mentari Airlines) Boeing 737-8 MAX 8 PK-LQP (msn 43000) BFI (James Helbock). Image: 944190.

Lion Air aircraft slide show:

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Boeing statement on MAX 8 Operations Manual Bulletin

Delivered August 13, 2018, crashed into the Java Sea on October 29, 2018

Boeing issued this statement:

Boeing is providing support and technical assistance to the Indonesian National Transportation Safety Committee and other government authorities responsible for the investigation into Lion Air flight 610.

 

The Indonesian National Transportation Safety Committee has indicated that Lion Air flight 610 experienced erroneous input from one of its AOA (Angle of Attack) sensors. 

 

Whenever appropriate, Boeing, as part of its usual processes, issues bulletins or makes recommendations regarding the operation of its aircraft. 

 

On November 6, 2018, Boeing issued an Operations Manual Bulletin (OMB) directing operators to existing flight crew procedures to address circumstances where there is erroneous input from an AOA sensor. 

 

The investigation into Lion Air flight 610 is ongoing and Boeing continues to cooperate fully and provide technical assistance at the request and under the direction of government authorities investigating the accident.

Top Copyright Photo: Lion Air (PT Lion Mentari Airlines) Boeing 737-8 MAX 8 PK-LQP (msn 43000) BFI (James Helbock). Image: 944190.

Lion Air aircraft slide show:

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Lion Air Boeing 737-8 MAX 8 crashes into the Java Sea, debris found

Delivered August 13, 2018, crashed into the Java Sea on October 29, 2018

Lion Air flight JT 610 from Jakarta to Pangkal Pinang, in the Bangka Belitung Islands, today (October 29, 2018) crashed into the Java Sea shortly after takeoff from Jakarta. The flight was carrying 181 passengers and six crew members. The flight crew made a request to return to JKT.

The aircraft involved was a new Boeing 737-8 MAX 8 (PK-LQP).

Lion Air issued this statement:

Lion Air flight JT610 en-route to Pangkalpinang has crashed near Kerawang (S 5’49.052” E 107’ 06.628”), 13 minutes after taking off from Jakarta Soekarno Hatta International Airport at 6:20 AM.

The flight carried 178 adults, 1 child and 2 infant, including 3 crew under training and 1 technician.

The aircraft is a Boeing 737 MAX 8 with registration number PK-LQP. It is made in 2018 and started its operation at Lion Air since August 15, 2018.  The aircraft was declared operationally feasible.

The aircraft is commanded by Captain. Bhavye Suneja and co-pilot Harvino with six cabin crew Shintia Melina, Citra Noivita Anggelia, Alviani Hidayatul  Solikha, Damayanti Simarmata, Mery Yulianda, and Deny Maula. The captain has 6,000 flight hours and the co-pilot has more than 5,000 flight hours.

Lion Air is concerned with the incident and will work with the relevant authorities and agencies on this matter.

The number to the crisis center is 021-80820001 and for customer information 021-80820002.

Read more from CNN: CLICK HERE

Read more from the BBC: CLICK HERE

Top Copyright Photo: Lion Air (PT Lion Mentari Airlines) Boeing 737-8 MAX 8 PK-LQP (msn 43000) BFI (James Helbock). Image: 944189.

Lion aircraft slide show:

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Chorus Aviation announces multi-aircraft leasing transaction with the Lion Air Group

Wings Air (Indonesia)-Lion Group ATR 72-212A (ATR 72-600) PK-WHP (msn 1290) DPS (Pascal Simon). Image: 944060.

Chorus Aviation Inc. announced today an agreement to lease four new ATR 72-600s to the Lion Air Group.

The first of these aircraft is scheduled for delivery in the fourth quarter of 2018, with the remaining three scheduled for delivery in the first and second quarters of 2019. It is anticipated that the aircraft will be operated by members of the Lion Air Group in Indonesia and Malaysia.

This transaction marks the second multi-aircraft leasing transaction in the fast-growing Southeast Asia region, expanding Chorus’ leasing business to 12 lessees in 12 countries and a total of 78 aircraft.

Upon completing the transaction contemplated by this announcement, Chorus Aviation Capital’s customers will comprise: Aeromexico Connect; Air Nostrum; Azul Airlines; CityJet; Ethiopian Airlines; Flybe; Falcon Aviation Services; KLM Cityhopper; Lion Air Group; Philippine Airlines; Virgin Australia; and its Chorus affiliate, Jazz Aviation.

Top Copyright Photo: Wings Air (Indonesia)-Lion Group ATR 72-212A (ATR 72-600) PK-WHP (msn 1290) DPS (Pascal Simon). Image: 944060.

Wings aircraft slide show:

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BOC Aviation purchases eight Airbus A330neo aircraft from Airbus for lease to Lion Air Group

BOC Aviation Limited has announced that it has purchased eight new Airbus A330neo family aircraft from Airbus.

All eight aircraft are scheduled for delivery to the Lion Air Group in 2019 and 2020. Lion Air will have the option to acquire four of the aircraft at delivery.

Lion Air Boeing 737-800 skids off the runway at Gorontalo

Lion Air flight  JT 892 from Makassar to Gorontalo with 174 passengers and seven crew members overran the runway at Gorontalo’s Djalaludin Airport, Indonesia Sunday (April 29) while attempting to land. The Boeing 737-800 (PK-LOO) was badly damaged. There were no reported injuries.

Read the full report from Jakarta Post: CLICK HERE

Social Media report:

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Boeing, Lion Air Group announce order for 50 737 MAX 10 airplanes

(PRNewsfoto/Boeing)

Boeing and the Lion Air Group have announced the airline purchased 50 of Boeing’s new 737 MAX 10 airplane, which will be the most fuel-efficient and profitable single-aisle jet in the aviation industry. The deal, valued at approximately $6.24 billion at list prices, is the largest incremental order to date of the MAX 10 variant. The order was previously listed as unidentified on Boeing’s Orders & Deliveries website.

 

The Lion Air Group was first in the world to put the 737 MAX 8 into service and the first to order the 737 MAX 9. Last month, the group became the first to take delivery of a 737 MAX 9, using the airplane’s added capacity to launch several international routes.

The 737 MAX is a family of airplanes that offer about 130 to 230 seats with the ability to fly up to 3,850 nautical miles (7,130 kilometers). These jets incorporate the latest CFM International LEAP-1B engines, Advanced Technology winglets, the Boeing Sky Interior, large flight deck displays and other features to deliver the highest efficiency, reliability and passenger comfort in the single-aisle market. The 737 MAX 10 is the largest variant in the family. At 43.8 m (143 ft 8 in) long, the airplane can seat a maximum of 230 passengers and offer airlines the lowest seat-mile cost ever in a single-aisle aircraft.

Image: Boeing.