Category Archives: QANTAS Airways

QANTAS Group to slash carbon emissions

100 Centenary Scheme - "QANTAS Time Capsule Towards 2120"

The QANTAS Group will reach net zero carbon emissions by 2050 in a major expansion of the airline’s commitment to a more sustainable aviation industry.

The national carrier will:

  • Immediately double the number of flights being offset
  • Cap net emissions from 2020 onwards
  • Invest $50 million over 10 years to help develop a sustainable aviation fuel industry

 

CUTTING NET CARBON EMISSION

This announcement means that Qantas is the only airline group to commit to cap its net emissions at 2020 levels, and the second to commit to net zero emissions by 2050.

In total, these commitments are the most ambitious carbon emissions targets of any airline group globally.

Qantas, Jetstar*, QantasLink and Qantas Freight will offset all growth in emissions from domestic and international operations from 2020.

This includes offsetting all net emissions from Project Sunrise, the carrier’s plan to operate non-stop flights from the east coast of Australia to London and New York, should the project proceed. This will also extend to domestic flying, meaning that growth on key routes like Melbourne-Sydney will be carbon neutral.

The aviation industry, which contributes around 2 per cent of global CO2 emissions, has committed to halving emissions by 2050 compared to 2005 levels. It was the first industry to make such commitments. Qantas had signed up to those commitments but will now exceed them.

Qantas will work with industry, research institutions and governments to develop the long-term solutions to significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the aviation industry over the next three decades.

OFFSETTING FLIGHTS

Qantas currently operates the largest carbon offset program in the aviation industry, with around 10 per cent of customers booking flights on Qantas.com choosing to offset their flights.

From today, Qantas and Jetstar will double the number of flights offset by matching every dollar spent by customers who tick the box to fly carbon neutral. By matching our customers’ commitment, we expect even more people to offset their emissions.

This additional investment will see Qantas Future Planet, which is already the largest private sector buyer of Australian carbon credits, support more conservation and environmental projects in Australia and around the world.

Existing projects include protecting the Great Barrier Reef, working with Indigenous communities to reduce wildfires in Western Australia and securing over 7000 hectares of native Tasmanian forest.

SUSTAINABLE AVIATION FUEL

Qantas will invest $50 million over the next ten years to help develop a sustainable aviation fuel industry.

Sustainable aviation fuel can reduce carbon emissions by eighty per cent compared to traditional jet fuel, but are currently almost double the price.

Qantas will work with governments and private sector partners to support the development of sustainable aviation fuel in Australia and overseas to make it more viable and increase demand throughout the industry.

The national carrier will also continue to reduce its emissions through continued investment in more fuel efficient aircraft, more efficient operations such as single-engine taxiing, and smarter flight planning to reduce fuel burn.

Qantas is on track to replace its Boeing 747 fleet by the end of 2020 with the more fuel-efficient B787 Dreamliners, which burn 20 per cent less fuel than aircraft of a similar size. Jetstar’s A321neo (LR) aircraft,
which begin arriving next year, use 15 per cent less fuel than the aircraft they are replacing.

The Qantas Group continues to work with aircraft and engine manufacturers on next-generation technology that will deliver a further step-change in emissions reduction – however, innovations such as electric aircraft engines are still some time away.

CEO COMMENTS

Qantas Group CEO Alan Joyce said these commitments would make Qantas a leader in the aviation industry’s efforts to reduce carbon emissions.

“We recognise that airlines have a responsibility to cut emissions and combat climate change. We’ve already made some good progress, especially by investing in newer aircraft that have a much smaller carbon footprint.

“We want to do more, and faster. We’re effectively doubling our carbon offsetting program from today and we’re capping our net emissions across Qantas and Jetstar from 2020 so that all new flying will be carbon
neutral.

“Qantas offsets all of its own travel needs and so do many of our customers. By matching their efforts, we’re hoping it will encourage even more people to offset and the program will keep growing.

“These short-term actions will go towards a longer-term goal of being completely net carbon neutral by 2050. It’s ambitious, but achievable.

“Innovation is going to be key. We’re investing $50 million to hopefully kickstart a sustainable aviation fuel industry in Australia. We know from our own trials that the technology works but we need to get to a scale of production where it’s a practical substitute.

“Concerns about emissions and climate change are real, but we can’t lose sight of the contribution that air travel makes to society and the economy. The industry has already come a long way in cutting its footprint and the solution from here isn’t to simply ‘fly less’ but to make it more sustainable.

“We’re doing this because it’s the responsible thing to do, but hopefully it will also encourage more people to choose Qantas and Jetstar because of the action we’re taking,” added Mr Joyce.

Copyright Photo: Gordon Reid via John Adlard.

In other news, Qantas has completed precautionary inspections of thirty-three 737NG aircraft, checking for hairline cracks that have appeared in some high cycle aircraft worldwide.

The cracks relate to the ‘pickle fork’ structure, which is located between the wing and fuselage. Qantas brought forward these precautionary checks by up to seven months and completed them within seven days.

Of the 33 of Qantas’ 737 aircraft that required inspection, three were found to have a hairline crack in the pickle fork structure. These aircraft have been removed from service for repair.

The aircraft had all completed around 27,000 cycles. Any aircraft with more than 22,600 cycles was inspected, in line with advice from regulators.

Qantas will minimise any customer impact from having these aircraft temporarily out of service.

Qantas is working with Civil Aviation Safety Authority and Boeing to resolve this issue, which involves some complex repair work. All three aircraft are expected to return to service before the end of the year.

CEO of Qantas Domestic, Andrew David said: “As people would expect with Qantas, we’ve gone above what was required to check our aircraft well ahead of schedule.

“We would never fly an aircraft that wasn’t safe. Even where these hairline cracks are present they’re not an immediate risk, which is clear from the fact the checks were not required for at least seven months.

“Unfortunately, there were some irresponsible comments from one engineering union, which completely misrepresented the facts. Those comments were especially disappointing given the fantastic job our engineers have done to inspect these aircraft well ahead of schedule, and the priority they give to safety every day of the week,” added Mr David.

Qantas will continue to monitor aircraft that are in scope of the airworthiness directive as inspections fall due.

Top Copyright Photo: QANTAS Airways Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner VH-ZNJ (msn 66074) (100 Centenary) PAE (Nick Dean). Image: 948008.

QANTAS Airways aircraft slide show:

Advertisements

Record-breaking nonstop New York – Sydney flight touches down

QANTAS Airways made this announcement:

The first nonstop commercial airline flight from New York to Sydney has landed after 19 hours 16 minutes in the air.

A total of 49 passengers and crew were on the flight, which was used to run a series of experiments to assess health and well-being onboard.

Data from these experiments will be used help shape the crew rostering and customer service of Qantas’ ultra long haul flights in future – including Project Sunrise (opens in new window).

Tests ranged from monitoring pilot brain waves, melatonin levels and alertness, through to exercise classes for passengers.

Cabin lighting and in-flight meals were also adjusted in ways that are expected to help reduce jetlag, according to the medical researchers and scientists (opens in new window) who have partnered with Qantas.

Arriving in Sydney, Qantas Group CEO Alan Joyce said: “This is a really significant first for aviation. Hopefully, it’s a preview of a regular service that will speed up how people travel from one side of the globe to the other.

“We know ultra long haul flights pose some extra challenges but that’s been true every time technology has allowed us to fly further. The research we’re doing should give us better strategies for improving comfort and wellbeing along the way.

“Night flights usually start with dinner and then lights off. For this flight, we started with lunch and kept the lights on for the first six hours, to match the time of day at our destination. It means you start reducing the jetlag straight away.

“What’s already clear is how much time you can save. Our regular, one-stop New York to Sydney service (QF12) took off three hours before our direct flight but we arrived a few minutes ahead of it, meaning we saved a significant amount of total travel time by not having to stop,” added Mr Joyce.

David Gray /Getty Images for Qantas

Qantas Captain Sean Golding, who led the four pilots operating the service, said: “The flight went really smoothly. Headwinds picked up overnight, which slowed us down to start with, but that was part of our scenario planning. Given how long we were airborne, we were able to keep optimising the flight path to make the best of the conditions.

“We had a lot of interest from air traffic controllers as we crossed through different airspace because of the uniqueness of this flight. We also had a special sign off and welcome home from the control towers in New York and Sydney, which you don’t get every day.

“Overall, we’re really happy with how the flight went and it’s great have some of the data we need to help assess turning this into a regular service,” said Captain Golding.

Two more research flights are planned as part of the Project Sunrise evaluations – London to Sydney in November and another New York to Sydney in December. Emissions from all research flights will be fully offset.

A decision on Project Sunrise is expected by the end of the year.

Photos by James D Morgan/Qantas.

American and QANTAS expand their relationship

American Airlines and QANTAS Airways will roll out improved frequent flyer benefits, including higher earning rates for points and status credits on each airline’s network. The partnership also includes enhanced connectivity with new codeshare destinations in the United States.

American customers will enjoy five additional codeshare markets with Qantas, and Qantas customers will benefit from enhanced connectivity across North America with access to more than 50 new routes and 30 new destinations.

This expansion is being implemented following the U.S. Department of Transportation’s final approval of Qantas and American’s joint business.

“Our customers are captivated by the natural beauty and cultural richness Australia and New Zealand offer, so we’re excited to bring them even more frequent flyer benefits and expanded codeshare opportunities for their adventures,” said Bridget Blaise-Shamai, President of the AAdvantage program and Vice President of Customer Loyalty and Insights for American.

More benefits for frequent flyers

AAdvantage members can now earn miles and elite status faster than ever on eligible flights between the United States and Australia or New Zealand thanks to an increase in mileage accrual. Members may earn up to two times more elite qualifying miles (EQMs) and elite qualifying dollars (EQDs) for most cabin classes on all eligible Qantas flights systemwide.

For more information about accruals, visit the Qantas partner page on aa.com.

Qantas Frequent Flyer members can now earn more Qantas Points and Status Credits on American flights. To learn more about Qantas Frequent Flyer earn rates, visit qantas.com.

Improved connectivity with new codeshare destinations

American also recently expanded its codeshare on new routes operated by Qantas, for a new total of 32 codeshare markets.

New flights operated by Qantas with expanded American codeshare:

  • Los Angeles (LAX) to Sydney (SYD)
  • Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) to SYD
  • San Francisco (SFO) to Melbourne, Australia (MEL)
  • SFO to Brisbane, Australia (BNE)
  • Chicago (ORD) to BNE

Qantas has expanded its codeshare with American, adding more than 50 new codeshare city pairs from DFW and ORD. This expansion adds 28 new codeshare destinations to the Qantas network in the United States.

With these new destinations, Qantas places its code on American services to more than 100 destinations and almost 200 domestic city pairs.

From DFW, the new codeshare destinations include:

  • Spokane (GEG)
  • Charleston (CHS)
  • Dayton (DAY)
  • Savannah (SAV)
  • Vail/Eagle (EGE)

From ORD, the new codeshare routes include:

  • New York (LGA and EWR)
  • Boston (BOS)
  • Miami (MIA)
  • Washington (DCA)
  • Philadelphia (PHL)
  • Charlotte (CLT)

In addition to the improved frequent flyer benefits, expanded codeshare and new routes to the United States, Qantas recently announced it would increase the number of reward seats made available to members.

QANTAS unveils its 100th anniversary logo jet in a special Centenary livery on 787-9 VH-ZNJ

QANTAS Airways has released photos of its new Boeing 787-9 VH-ZNJ “Longreach” after the airliner emerged from the paint shop.

The special design features a “100” design with the airline logos from its history.

The airline issued this statement:

Qantas’ newest 787 Dreamliner has rolled out of the paint shop at Boeing’s factory in Washington State, wearing a special Centenary livery to celebrate the flying kangaroo’s 100th year in the skies.

Qantas will turn 99 in November, and as it enters its 100th year of operations, is embarking on a range of initiatives to celebrate the Spirit of Australia.

The special livery features each Qantas logo since its 1920 founding in outback Queensland through to today, along with the newly unveiled ‘Qantas100’ imprint that will run across its Centenary celebrations.

The Boeing 787 Dreamliner, registration VH-ZNJ, is named “Longreach” – a nod to the Queensland town that was integral to the national carrier’s beginnings, its role in conquering the tyranny of distance and the Longreach series of retiring 747-400 jumbo jets.

The aircraft – Qantas’s tenth Dreamliner – will undergo a series of delivery test flights in Seattle prior its handover from Boeing next month. It will operate the second of Qantas’ Project Sunrise research flights, flying non-stop from London to Sydney and replicating the journey of the first 747-400 delivery 30 years ago. It will then enter normal commercial service with Qantas International.

Qantas CEO Alan Joyce said the aircraft livery is a reminder of the airline’s past on its newest piece of technology.

“The story of Qantas is the story of modern Australia, and the logos on this livery tell that story from the beginning,” Mr Joyce said.

“Our Centenary celebrations are all about honouring our past with an eye on the future, so it’s very fitting that this special livery will be worn by our newest state-of-the-art Dreamliner.”

Over the past century, Queensland and Northern Territory Aerial Services has evolved from delivering the mail in the outback to serving as the national carrier – from two passengers at a time to 50 million a year.

Mr Joyce said Qantas began by assembling its own aircraft and now flies non-stop from Australia to Europe, having established an unrivalled reputation for safety in the process.

“We have a lot of exciting things planned to mark the Centenary, so watch this space,” he said.

QANTAS introduces its upgraded Airbus A380 fleet

QANTAS Airways has made this announcement:

The best of Australian fashion, design and food are all showcased onboard the first of Qantas’ upgraded Airbus A380 aircraft, which touched back down in Sydney this morning (October 2).

All 12 of the national carrier’s A380 aircraft will be refurbished as part of a multimillion-dollar upgrade, delivering higher levels of comfort and a higher number of premium seats.

Qantas Group CEO Alan Joyce said the upgrade would benefit customers in every cabin.

“Australians are used to flying long haul and we know it’s important to make the journey comfortable,” Mr Joyce said.

“We’re very proud to showcase the best of Australian design, wine and food on these services which will provide a step change in comfort.”

Australian designer David Caon has transformed the aircraft’s upper deck lounge, which has been significantly expanded.  It now features seating for 10 people on deep green leather couches and wood panelled walls. Customers will be able to order from a range of bespoke snacks and light meals to be enjoyed in the lounge.

The Caon-designed Premium Economy seat, which made its debut on the Qantas Dreamliner fleet, also features as part of the upgrade. Smarter use of space on the A380 has allowed Qantas to increase the number of Premium Economy seats from 35 to 60.

The Qantas Business Suite, dubbed “mini First” by the airline’s frequent flyers, has replaced the Skybed and provides direct aisle access for every passenger.

In total, there is a 27 percent boost to premium seats, improving the economics of the aircraft and allowing Qantas to respond to growing demand on long-haul flights.

The airline has used the introduction of the upgraded A380 to roll out several improvements for passengers travelling in the airline’s First cabin including:

  • A refresh of the First Suite with new contoured cushioning and higher resolution entertainment screen.
  • Redesigned Martin Grant sleeper suit in dark charcoal with a Henley neckline and burgundy trim introduced from November.
  • New First amenity kits including socks made from bamboo cotton and new skin care products from Australian brand LaGaia Unedited.
  • The LaGaia Unedited First amenities (launching onboard in November) that incorporate a Qantas-signature Australian native scent of lemon myrtle and geranium in a refreshing facial mist, accompanied by a moisturiser and lip balm. LaGaia Unedited products will be stocked in the First lavatories. From late November, LaGaia Unedited will move into Qantas’ Sydney and Melbourne First Lounge spa facilities.

Qantas chef Neil Perry and his Rockpool team have created a menu of snacks and light meals to be enjoyed by First and Business Class customers in the redesigned upper deck lounge.

Passengers will be able to chose from dishes including dry laska goreng with fishcakes and seared prawns to mushroom arancini in a tomato ragu as part of custom-designed menus for each route.

The lounge also features a new self service bar, while customers will also be able to order signature cocktails including an Australian Negroni with mountain pepper and river mint as well as the Qantas signature gin and tonic with pink grapefruit.

Qantas’ A380s will also feature a larger dedicated Premium Economy cabin including a self-service bar.

The capacity of Qantas A380s after the upgrade will be: 14 First Suites (unchanged), 70 Business Suites (up by six), 60 Premium Economy (up by 25) and 341 Economy (down by 30) for a total of 485 passengers (up by one).

Qantas expects to complete the refurbishment of all remaining 11 aircraft by the end of 2020.

All photos by QANTAS.

Atlas Air to operate two Boeing 747-8F freighters for QANTAS Freight

QANTAS Airways has made this announcement:

QANTAS Freight has welcomed a new addition to its fleet with the first of two Boeing 747-8F freighter aircraft touching down in Sydney today.

The next generation freighters will be operated by Atlas Air, on behalf of QANTAS. Each aircraft offers 20 percent more freight capacity and space for seven extra cargo pallets compared to the 747-400F.

The two freighters will operate between Australia, China and the USA with additional routes currently being explored. The second 747-8F aircraft will enter service later this week.

While the aircraft will be painted in Atlas Air livery, the QANTAS Freight logo will be displayed on either side of the nose and underneath the freighters’ nose cargo door.

The 747-8’s iconic nose door allows easier loading of oversized cargo and helps achieve faster turnaround times.

The arrival of the new aircraft follows QANTAS Freight’s announced of a new seven-year agreement with Australia Post to enhance the domestic network. The new agreement, worth more than $1 billion, also paves the way for up to three A321 passenger to freighter aircraft join the fleet from October 2020.

QANTAS to operate ‘Project Sunrise” research flights from New York and London

Photo by David Gray/Getty Images for Qantas

QANTAS Airways has made this announcement:

  • Re-purposed Boeing 787-9 delivery flights scheduled for October, November and December
  • On-board research to test ways of improving wellbeing on ultra long-haul flights
  • Made possible by carrying 40 people to increase aircraft range

Qantas has announced three ultra long-haul research flights to gather new data about inflight passenger and crew health and wellbeing.

The flights form part of planning for Project Sunrise – Qantas’ goal to operate regular, non-stop commercial flights from the east coast of Australia (Brisbane, Sydney and Melbourne) to London and New York.

The three flights over three months will use new Boeing 787-9s and re-route their planned delivery flights. Instead of flying empty from Seattle to Australia, the aircraft will simulate two Project Sunrise routes – London and New York to Sydney.

Photo by David Gray/Getty Images for Qantas

 

This will represent the world’s first flight by a commercial airline direct from New York to Sydney and only the second time a commercial airline has flown direct from London to Sydney.

Each flight will have a maximum of 40 people, including crew, in order to minimise weight and give the necessary fuel range. Carbon emissions from the flights will be fully offset.

The on-board research is being designed in partnership with Sydney University’s Charles Perkins Centre and Monash University in conjunction with CRC for Alertness, Safety and Productivity.

People in the cabin – mostly Qantas employees – will be fitted with wearable technology devices and take part in specific experiences at varying stages of the approximately 19 hour flights. Scientists and medical experts from the Charles Perkins Centre will monitor sleep patterns, food and beverage consumption, lighting, physical movement and inflight entertainment to assess impact on health, wellbeing and body clock.

Monash University researchers will work with pilots  to record crew melatonin levels before, during and after the flights.  Pilots will wear an EEG (electroencephalogram) device that tracks brain wave patterns and monitors alertness.  The aim is to establish data to assist in building the optimum work and rest pattern for pilots operating long haul services.

Qantas Group CEO Alan Joyce said the flights will give medical experts the chance to do real-time research that will translate into health and wellbeing benefits.

“Ultra-long haul flying presents a lot of common sense questions about the comfort and wellbeing of passengers and crew. These flights are going to provide invaluable data to help answer them.

“For customers, the key will be minimising jet lag and creating an environment where they are looking forward to a restful, enjoyable flight. For crew, it’s about using scientific research to determine the best opportunities to promote alertness when they are on duty and maximise rest during their down time on these flights.

“Flying nonstop from the East Coast of Australia to London and New York is truly the final frontier in aviation, so we’re determined to do all the groundwork to get this right.

“No airline has done this kind of dedicated research before and we’ll be using the results to help shape the cabin design, inflight service and crew roster patterns for Project Sunrise. We’ll also be looking at how we can use it to improve our existing long-haul flights,” added Mr Joyce.

Qantas has already conducted data on passenger sleep strategies on its direct Perth–London service, and some of these initial findings will be assessed further as part of these dedicated research flights. Customer feedback on food choices, separate stretching and wellbeing zones and entertainment options will also be tested.

Findings on crew wellbeing data will be shared with the Civil Aviation Safety Authority to help inform regulatory requirements associated with ultra-long haul flights. (opens in new window)

Airbus and Boeing have both pitched aircraft (A350 and 777X) to Qantas that are capable of operating Project Sunrise flights with a viable commercial payload. A final decision on Project Sunrise – which depends on aircraft economics, regulatory approvals and industrial agreements – is expected by the end of December 2019.

Mr Joyce added: “There’s plenty of enthusiasm for Sunrise, but it’s not a foregone conclusion.  This is ultimately a business decision and the economics have to stack up.”

PROJECT SUNRISE RESEARCH FLIGHTS – KEY FACTS

  • Non-stop flights from New York and London to Sydney will take around 19 hours each, subject to wind and weather conditions. The data will be used to inform all Sunrise flight planning, including from Brisbane and Melbourne.
  • The aircraft will position from Boeing’s factory in Seattle, where they will be collected off the production line by Qantas pilots, and flown to their starting points of New York (for two of the flights) and London (for one flight). Cabins will be fully fitted out and otherwise ready to enter normal commercial service.
  • The flights will take place in October, November and December, in-line with scheduled aircraft deliveries from Boeing.
  • Flights will have up to 40 people (including crew) on board and a minimum of luggage and catering to extend the range of 787-9.
  • Other than crew, those in the cabin will mostly be Qantas employees taking part in testing. No seats will be sold as these flights are for research purposes only.
  • After the flights, each aircraft will enter regular service with Qantas International – with just a few extra miles on the clock.
  • Qantas operates the largest airline carbon offset scheme in the world. This same program will be used to offset all the carbon emissions from these three flights.
  • No commercial airline has ever flown direct from New York to Australia. Qantas has once flown non-stop from London to Sydney in 1989 to mark the entry into service of the Boeing 747-400. That flight had a total of 23 people on board and minimal internal fit-out in order to provide the range. The aircraft, registered VH-OJA, was donated by Qantas in 2017 to the Historical Aircraft Restoration Society near Wollongong, New South Wales.