Category Archives: Norwegian (Sweden)

Norwegian reports a positive passenger traffic trend in June

Fridtjof Nansen, Norwegian explorer

Norwegian’s traffic figures for June continue to be heavily influenced by travel restrictions and therefore low demand. However, forward bookings and demand continue to show a positive increase as a greater number of markets unlock and ease restrictions. In July, the number of aircraft and routes will gradually increase.

In June, 225 509 passengers flew with Norwegian, which is approx. 100 percent more than at the same time last year. Compared with June 2020, the total capacity (ASK) has increased by 182 percent and passenger traffic (RPK) up 102 percent. The load factor in June was 62.9 percent, a decrease of 25 percentage points compared with last year.

“June traffic results still show the impact of low demand due to reduced flying schedules and government imposed travel restrictions. However, we have seen a continued month on month increase in bookings as countries ease restrictions. As a result, we have resumed flights to a number of key European destinations, we will continue to adjust and increase our network and schedules as demand rises.” Said Geir Karlsen, CEO of Norwegian.

Norwegian operated 15 aircraft in June. During the month the company operated 99.9 percent of its scheduled flights, with 94.1 percent departing on time.

Top Copyright Photo: Norwegian.com (Norwegian Air Sweden) Boeing 737-8JP WL SE-RRF (msn 39004) (Fridtjof Nansen, Norwegian explorer) ARN (Stefan Sjogren). Image: 954104.

Norwegian: Travel restrictions continue to impact operations in April

"Jean Sibelius. Finnish composer"

Norwegian Air Shuttle issued this report:

Norwegian’s traffic figures for April are impacted by government travel restrictions and therefore low demand.

In April 59431 customers flew with Norwegian, an increase of approximately 18000 compared to the same period last year. The capacity (ASK) was down 7 percent, and the total passenger traffic (RPK) was up by 115 percent.

The load factor was 42.2 percent, up 24 percentage points, compared to April last year.

“The pandemic and international travel restrictions continue to impact our traffic results when compared to the same period last year despite the percentage increases. However, as the reopening of borders in Norway and across Europe progresses, we are confident that we will continue to see a gradual increase in year on year traffic. We continuously adjust our operations to changes in demand.” Said Jacob Schram, CEO of Norwegian.

Norwegian operated ten aircraft in April, mainly on domestic routes in Norway. The company operated 97.7 percent of its scheduled flights in April, whereof 97.8 percent departed on time.

Top Copyright Photo: Norwegian.com (Norwegian Air Sweden) Boeing 737-8JP WL SE-RRZ (msn 42083) (Jean Sibelius, Finnish composer) PAE (Nick Dean). Image: 953561.

Norwegian (Sweden) aircraft slide show:

Norwegian closes its long-haul network, Gatwick jobs at stake, will focus on Europe and 737s

Norwegian has made a major decision to shut down its long-haul Boeing 787 Dreamliner network and concentrate on short-haul operations from Europe with this announcement:

Norwegian’s Board of Directors has outlined a simplified business structure and dedicated short haul route network. With this plan, Norwegian can build a robust and solid company that will attract investors and continue to serve new and existing customers.

Norwegian has long been recognized as an industry leader in low cost travel, winning numerous awards. The company will build on this foundation, focusing on its core Nordics business, operating a European short haul network with narrow body aircraft. The airline will continue to meet its customers’ needs by offering competitive fares across a broad range of domestic routes in Norway, across the Nordics and to key European destinations.

“Our short haul network has always been the backbone of Norwegian and will form the basis of a future resilient business model,” said Jacob Schram, CEO of Norwegian.

The current plan is to serve these markets with around 50 narrow body aircraft in operation in 2021 and to increase that number to around 70 narrow body aircraft in 2022. Furthermore, Norwegian targets to reduce its debt significantly to around NOK 20 billion and to raise NOK 4 – 5 billion in new capital through a combination of a rights issue to current shareholders, a private placement and a hybrid instrument. The company has received concrete interest in participation in the private placement. Norwegian has recently reinitiated a dialogue with the Norwegian government about possible state participation based on the new business plan.

The COVID-19 pandemic has profoundly affected the entire aviation industry. Travel restrictions and changing government advice continue to negatively influence demand for long haul travel, and Norwegian’s entire Boeing 787 Dreamliner fleet has been grounded since March 2020. Future demand remains highly uncertain. Under these circumstances a long haul operation is not viable for Norwegian and these operations will not continue. The consequence of this decision is that the board of directors of the legal entities employing primarily long haul staff in Italy, France, the UK and the US have contacted insolvency practitioners. Norwegian will continue to assess profitable opportunities as the world adapts and recovers from the impact of COVID-19.

Customers with bookings affected by the future changes in our route network will be contacted directly and will be refunded. The examinership and reconstruction processes undertaken in Ireland and Norway will continue as planned, and the plan presented today is subject to approval by the Examiner and Reconstructor, support from the creditors and subsequently court approval.

Norwegian Air Shuttle aircraft photo gallery:

Norwegian Air Shuttle aircraft slide show:

Norwegian commits to reduce CO2 emissions by 45 percent by 2030

Norwegian Air Shuttle made this announcement:

Norwegian has launched a new environmental sustainability strategy that will begin immediately and deliver several industry leading targets. Cutting CO2 emissions by 45 percent, remove all non-recyclable plastics and recycle all single-use plastics are key commitments in the new strategy. The goal is in line with the 1.5°C target set forth in the Paris Agreement.

Jacob Schram, CEO of Norwegian, said: “At Norwegian we take our responsibility towards the environment seriously, and that is why we must look to the future and implement a strategy that produces immediate and tangible benefits for the environment today. Norwegian will continue to instigate a positive change across the industry in this field that will benefit not only the environment but also our customers and our business. The low-cost business model is the sustainability model as it enables efficient energy and resource management.”

Will require 500 million litres sustainable aviation fuels

To limit global warming to 1.5°C, carbon emissions must be reduced by 45 percent by 2030 compared to 2010 levels, according to the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC, 2018). We commit to improve the carbon efficiency of our operations and will reduce our carbon emissions by 45 percent per passenger kilometer (RPK) by 2030 – compared to 2010 levels. This will be achieved through both fleet renewal and sustainable aviation fuels.

The airline commits to utilising between 16 and 28 percent sustainable aviation fuels by the end of the decade, depending on the level of fleet renewal. The target amounts to up to 500 million litres sustainable aviation fuels by 2030.

To achieve this important goal, it is also crucial to get in place a regulatory framework that actively rewards carbon efficiency and increases both the production and use of sustainable aviation fuel.

Jacob Schram said: “We encourage producers to ramp up production of sustainable aviation fuels. Norwegian will be actively engaging with producers to kick start this vital contribution to the industry and take advantage of the emission savings that these fuels offer.”

Will remove all non-recyclable plastics

Initial elements of the sustainability strategy will also include a 100 percent reduction of non-recyclable plastics and 100 percent recycling of single-use plastics by 2023.

Anders Fagernæs, Norwegian Head of Environmental Sustainability, said: “More sustainable and smarter options are becoming a greater part of the considerations that customers make when choosing which airline to fly with. We will champion this attitude and become the customers sustainable choice by reducing and recycling plastic waste, promoting sustainable aviation fuel and continuing to fly one of the world’s youngest fleets to achieve a 45 percent reduction in CO2 emissions by 2030.”

A solid foundation

Norwegian is already one of the world’s leading fuel-efficient carriers due to its modern fuel-efficient aircraft. Norwegian was the first airline to sign the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) pledge, committing to become carbon neutral by 2050.

The airline was also voted the world’s most fuel-efficient airline on transatlantic routes in 2015 and 2018 by the International Council on Clean Transportation (ICCT) and since 2010 the airline has reduced its emissions by 28 percent.

Norwegian Air calls for a special meeting on May 4 to discuss its future

Norwegian Air Shuttle (Norwegian Air) is basically in hibernation as its plans its future. The beleaguered airline has called for a special meeting on May 4, 2020.

At that meeting, the management of the company is expected to present a new restructuring plan that will see a much smaller airline if approved. Creditors will be asked to exchange debt for equity.

The company is also planning a hibernation phase that will last until next winter.

Read more from Forbes.

Norwegian aircraft photo gallery:

Norwegian discontinues its transAtlantic Boeing 737 MAX routes

Norwegian.com (Norwegian Air Sweden) Boeing 737-8 MAX 8 SE-RTE (msn 42838) BFI (Joe G. Walker). Image: 947301.

Norwegian has made this announcement:

Norwegian will discontinue its transAtlantic routes originally operated by the Boeing 737 MAX aircraft this September. The decision follows months of substitute aircraft and wetlease operations covering the airline’s routes due to the global grounding of the 737 MAX aircraft. There are no changes to the 46 nonstop routes operated by the Dreamliner from the United States to Europe.

“Since March, we have tirelessly sought to minimize the impact on our customers by hiring, so called wetleasing, replacement aircraft to operate services between North America and Ireland. However, as the return to service date for the 737 MAX remains uncertain, this solution is unsustainable,” said Matthew Robert Wood, Senior Vice President Commercial Long-Haul and New Markets, Norwegian.

In March, Norwegian managed to implement a back-up plan within 24 hours of the Boeing 737 MAX grounding, accommodating all customers booked on the airline’s 737 MAX routes from both New York Stewart International Airport and Providence, as well as launch the new route from Hamilton/Toronto, Canada, to Dublin.

Nonstop services to Cork and Shannon ended in March with the grounding of the 737 MAX aircraft and passengers were rerouted to Dublin flights out of both Providence and Stewart. The service to Dublin from the two U.S. cities and, also Hamilton, Canada, continued, but will now end with the last flight from the U.S. – both Providence and Stewart – on September 14, arriving in Dublin on September 15. The last flight from Hamilton, Canada, will depart September 13. Norwegian will no longer operate any substitute aircraft for the 737 MAX.

This will not affect the airline’s other long-haul services, operated by its Boeing 787 Dreamliner fleet. Norwegian currently operates 46 routes from the U.S. to Europe this summer season, more than any other European airline.

Norwegian would like to thank the partners that made it possible to launch its transatlantic MAX operations back in 2017, specifically the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, New York Stewart International Airport, Providence’s T.F. Green Airport and Tourism Ireland, as well as the John C. Munro Hamilton International Airport.

Top Copyright Photo: Norwegian.com (Norwegian Air Sweden) Boeing 737-8 MAX 8 SE-RTE (msn 42838) BFI (Joe G. Walker). Image: 947301.