Tag Archives: Boeing 737 MAX

Iran Aseman Airlines signs MOA for 30 Boeing 737 MAX aircraft

Boeing 737-8 MAX 8 SSWL N8703J (msn 42556) BFI (Nick Dean). Image: 934344.

Boeing confirms the signing of a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) with Iran Aseman Airlines, expressing the airline’s intent to purchase 30 Boeing 737 MAX airplanes with a list price value of $3 billion. The agreement also provides the airline with purchase rights for 30 additional 737 MAXs.

According to the U.S. Department of Commerce, an aerospace sale of this magnitude creates or sustains approximately 18,000 jobs in the United States. Deliveries would be scheduled to start in 2022.

Boeing negotiated the MOA under authorizations from the U.S. government following a determination that Iran had met its obligations under the nuclear accord signed in 2015. Boeing will look to the Office of Foreign Assets Control for approval to perform under this transaction. Boeing continues to follow the lead of the U.S. government with regards to working with Iran’s airlines, and any and all contracts with Iran’s airlines are contingent upon U.S. government approval.

Copyright Photo: Boeing 737-8 MAX 8 SSWL N8703J (msn 42556) BFI (Nick Dean). Image: 934344.

Advertisements

Boeing and Korean Air finalize an order for 30 737 MAXs and 2 777-300 ERs

Korean Air 737 MAX and 777-300ER (Boeing)(LR)

Boeing (Chicago, Seattle and Charleston) and Korean Air (Seoul) today finalized the airline’s order of 30 737 MAXs and two additional 777-300 ER (Extended Range) jetliners valued at nearly $4 billion at current list prices. The airline also has options for additional 737 MAXs as part of the order, which was previously announced as a commitment during the Paris Air Show in June.

Boeing logo (medium)

With this order for up to 52 Boeing airplanes, Korean Air becomes Boeing’s newest 737 MAX customer and now has 62 firm Boeing airplane orders on backlog.

As part of this order for 737 MAX airplanes, Korean Air also adds another two 777-300ERs as it continues to modernize its long-haul widebody fleet.

Korean Air logo

Korean Air currently operates a fleet of 91 Boeing passenger airplanes that consist of 737, 747 and 777 models. The airline also operates an all-Boeing cargo fleet of 28 747-400, 747-8 and 777 Freighters.

Image: Boeing.

Korean Air aircraft slide show: AG Airline Slide Show

AG Aviation Gifts and Keepsakes

Boeing begins final assembly of the first 737 MAX

Boeing (Chicago, Seattle and Charleston) employees in Renton, Washington, have started final assembly on schedule of the first 737 MAX 8, the first member of Boeing’s new, more efficient single-aisle family.

After the first fuselage arrived on August 21 from Spirit Aerosystems in Wichita, Kansas, mechanics began installing flight systems and insulation blankets.

Crews next moved the fuselage to the wing-to-body join position on the new production line where the first MAXs will be built. Mechanics then attached the wings to the body of the airplane.

The wings feature Boeing’s new Advanced Technology winglets. Designed exclusively for the 737 MAX, they will give customers up to 1.8 percent additional fuel-efficiency improvement over today’s inline winglet designs.

Boeing will build the first 737 MAXs exclusively on the new production line in the Renton factory. Once mechanics prove out the production process, the team will extend MAX production to the other two final assembly lines in Renton.

The 737 MAX team remains on track to roll out the first completed 737 MAX by the end of the year and fly it in early 2016. Launch customer Southwest Airlines is scheduled to take delivery of the first 737 MAX in the third quarter of 2017. In total, the 737 MAX family has 2,869 orders from 58 customers worldwide.

Photos: Boeing.

Boeing brings the first 737 MAX fuselage to Renton

Boeing 1st Boeing 737 MAX Fuselage

Boeing (Chicago, Seattle and Charleston) on Friday (August 21) brought the first 737 MAX fuselage to the Renton, WA plant. The fuselage was built in Wichita, KS and transported by rail to the Washington State plant.

Boeing 737 Customers 1

Boeing 737 Customers 2

Boeing explains the production of the Boeing 737 over the years:

Boeing logo (medium)

The first 271 737s were built in Seattle at Boeing Plant 2, just over the road from Boeing Field, (BFI). However, with the sales of all Boeing models falling and large scale staff layoffs in 1969, it was decided to consolidate production of the 707, 727 and 737 at Renton just 5 miles away. In December 1970 the first 737 built at Renton flew and all 737s have been assembled there ever since.

However not all of the 737 is built at Renton. For example, since 1983 the fuselage including nose and tailcone has been built at Wichita and brought to Renton by train. Also much of the sub-assembly work is outsourced beyond Boeing.

Production methods have evolved enormously since the first 737 was made in 1966. The main difference is that instead of the aircraft being assembled in one spot they are now on a moving assembly line similar to that used in car production. This has the effect of accelerating production, which not only reduces the order backlog and waiting times for customers but also reduces production costs. The line moves continuously at a rate of 2 inches per minute; stopping only for worker breaks, critical production issues or between shifts. Timelines painted on the floor help workers gauge the progress of manufacturing.

When the fuselage arrives at Renton, it is fitted with wiring looms, pneumatic and air-conditioning ducting and insulation before being lifted onto the moving assembly line. Next, the tailfin is lifted into place by an overhead crane and attached. Floor panels and galleys are then installed and functional testing begins. In a test called the “high blow”, the aircraft is pressurised to create a cabin differential pressure equivalent to an altitude of 93,000 feet. This ensures that there are no air leaks and that the structure is sound. In another test, the aircraft is jacked up so that the landing gear retraction & extension systems can be tested. As the aircraft moves closer to the end of the line, the cabin interior is completed – seats, lavatories, luggage bins, ceiling panels, carpets etc. The final stage is to mount the engines. There are approximately 367,000 parts on a 737 NG.

The present build time is now just 11 days (5,500 airplane unit hours of work) with a future target of 6 days (4,000 airplane unit hours of work). In Dec 2005 a second production line was opened to increase the production rate to 31 aircraft a month. By 2007 there was a three year waiting list for new 737s, and an order backlog of over 1,600 aircraft. A third production line is under construction dedicated to the MMA order.

After construction they make one flight, over to BFI where they are painted and fitted out to customer specifications. It takes about 200ltrs (50USgallons) of paint to paint a 737. This will weigh over 130kg (300lbs) per aircraft, depending on the livery. Any special modifications or conversions (eg for the C40A, AEW&C or MMA) are done at Wichita after final assembly of the green aircraft. Auxiliary fuel tanks and specialist interiors for VIP aircraft are fitted by PATS at Georgetown, Delaware.

The fuselage is a semi-monocoque structure. It made from various aluminium alloys except for the following parts.

  • Fiberglass: radome, tailcone, centre & outboard flap track farings.
  • Kevlar: Engine fan cowls, inboard track faring (behind engine), nose gear doors.
  • Graphite/Epoxy: rudder, elevators, ailerons, spoilers, thrust reverser cowls, dorsal of vertical stab.

Different types of alluminium alloys are used for different areas of the aircraft depending upon the characteristics required. The alloys are mainly aluminium, zinc, magnesium & copper but also contain traces of silicon, iron, manganese, chromium, titanium, zirconium and probably several other elements that remain trade secrets. The different alloys are mixed with different ingredients to give different properties as shown below:

Fuselage skin, slats, flaps – areas primarily loaded in tension – Aluminium alloy 2024 (Aluminium & copper) – Good fatigue performance, fracture toughness and slow propagation rate.

Frames, stringers, keel & floor beams, wing ribs – Aluminium alloy 7075 (Aluminium & zinc) – High mechanical properties and improved stress corrosion cracking resistance.

737-200 only: Bulkheads, window frames, landing gear beam – Aluminium alloy 7079 (Aluminium & zinc) Tempered to minimise residual heat treatment stresses.

Wing upper skin, spars & beams – Aluminium alloy 7178 (Aluminium, zinc, magnesium & copper) – High compressive strength to weight ratio.

Landing gear beam – Aluminium alloy 7175 (Aluminium, zinc, magnesium & copper) – A very tough, very high tensile strength alloy.

Wing lower skin – Aluminium alloy 7055 (Aluminium, zinc, magnesium & copper) – Superior stress corrosion.

Outsourcing

Many components are not built by Boeing but are outsourced to other manufacturers both in the US and increasingly around the world. This may be either for cost savings in production, specialist development or as an incentive for that country to buy other Boeing products. Here is a list of some of the outsourced components:

  • Fuselage, engine nacelles and pylons – Spirit AeroSystems (formerly Boeing), Wichita.
  • Slats and flaps – Spirit AeroSystems (formerly Boeing), Tulsa.
  • Doors – Vought, Stuart, FL.
  • Spoilers – Goodrich, Charlotte, NC.
  • Vertical fin – Xi’an Aircraft Industry, China.
  • Horizontal stabiliser – Korea Aerospace Industries.
  • Ailerons – Asian Composites Manufacturing, Malaysia.
  • Rudder – Bombardier, Belfast.
  • Tail section (aluminium extrusions for) – Alcoa / Shanghai Aircraft Manufacturing, China.
  • Main landing gear doors – Aerospace Industrial Development Corp, Taiwan.
  • Inboard Flap – Mitsubishi, Japan.
  • Elevator – Fuji, Japan.
  • Winglets – Kawasaki, Japan.
  • Forward entry door & Overwing exits – Chengdu Aircraft, China.
  • Wing-to-body fairing panels and tail cone – BHA Aero Composite Parts Co. Ltd, China.

Boeing 737 logo

737 NG Key Production Dates:

17 Nov 1993: Boeing directors authorize the Next-Generation 737-600/-700/-800 program. Southwest Airlines launches the -700 program, with an order for 63 aircraft.

5 Sep 1994: The 737-800 is launched at the Farnborough Air Show.

15 Mar 1995: The 737-600 is launched with an order for 35 from SAS.

28 Apr 1995: The new engine for the Next-Generation 737 family, the CFM56-7, powers up for its first ground test at the Snecma test facility in Villaroche, France.

1 Dec 1995: Major assembly begins on the No. 1 737-700 model when a 55-foot-long spar, or horizontal wing structure, is loaded into an automated assembly tool in the Renton, Wash., factory. Assembly also begins in Wichita, Kan., on the first 737-700 fuselage Section 43 panel (an upper fuselage section).

16 Jan 1996: The CFM56-7, makes its first flight attached to the left-hand wing of a General Electric 747 flying test bed in Mojave, Calif.

20 Mar 1996: The 737-700 program reaches its 90 percent product definition release, marking a major engineering milestone for the new 737 family. The milestone signifies the transition from the development phase to production phase of the program.

22 Apr 1996: The first 737-700 machined wing ribs arrive from Kawasaki Heavy Industries in Japan. Boeing 737 wing ribs were previously built-up assemblies. The single-pieced machined ribs increase quality and decrease weight.

30 Apr 1996: The first Common Display System for the 737-600/-700/-800 flight deck arrives at the Boeing Integrated Aircraft Systems Laboratory in Seattle. The programmable software display unit allows airlines to easily maintain the flight deck and to tailor it to their specifications.

17 Jun 1996: Assembly begins in Wichita, Kan., on the No. 1 nose, or cab, section for the first Boeing 737-700.

2 Jul 1996: Boeing launch the Boeing Business Jet, derived from the 737-700 model.

15 Jul 1996: Employees at the Boeing Renton, Wash., factory unload the No. 1, left-hand 737-700 wing out of its tooling and move the approximately 50-foot-long structure to its next manufacturing position.

26 Jul 1996: The last major body structure for the first 737-700 fuselage is loaded into the integration tool in Wichita, Kan.

12 Aug 1996: Assembly begins in Wichita, Kan., on the nose section of the first 737-800.

24 Aug 1996: The first 737-700 one-piece fuselage leaves Wichita, Kan., bound for Renton, Wash.

3 Sep 1996: The first completed 737-700 fuselage arrives in Renton, Wash., after travelling nearly 2,200 miles from the Boeing Wichita plant. The first pair of CFM56-7 engines arrive at Propulsion Systems Division in Seattle for engine build-up.

18 Sep 1996: Wings are attached to the first 737-700 fuselage in the Renton, Wash., 737 factory.

6 Oct 1996: The first 737-700 fuselage rolls on its own landing gear to the final assembly area, where flight control surfaces, engine and systems are installed.

7 Oct 1996: The 23-foot, 5-inch vertical tail is installed on the first 737-700. The vertical tail weighs approximately 1,500 pounds.

10 Oct 1996: The horizontal stabilizers are attached to the first 737-700, completing the installation of all major airplane structures.

20 Oct 1996: The second 737-700 fuselage arrives in Renton from the Boeing Wichita plant.

26 Oct 1996: The first CFM56-7 engine is attached to the right wing of the first 737-700. The left-hand engine is installed the next day.

29 Nov 1996: The No. 3. 737-700 arrives in Renton from the Boeing Wichita plant.

2 Dec 1996: The first 737-700 rolls out of the Renton factory and advances into the paint hangar.

8 Dec 1996: The first 737-700 is introduced to the world at The Boeing Company’s Renton, Wash., plant. Nearly 50,000 guests attend the Next-Generation 737 celebration.

9 Feb 1997: The first Boeing 737-700 makes its maiden flight, with Boeing Capts. Mike Hewett and Ken Higgins at the airplane’s controls. At 10:05 a.m. PST, the airplane — painted in the Boeing red, white and blue livery — takes off from Renton Municipal Airport in Renton, Wash., as hundreds of Boeing employees and their families watch and cheer. After heading north over Lake Washington, the pilots fly the newest member of the 737 family north over Tattoosh, east to Spokane and then back to Western Washington before landing at Boeing Field in Seattle.

14 Mar 1997: The fuselage of the first 737-800, destined for German-carrier Hapag-Lloyd, arrives in Renton from Boeing Wichita, after traveling 2,190 miles by railcar. At 129 feet 6 inches in length, the 737-800 is 19 feet 2 inches longer than the 737-700.

11 Apr 1997: The first 737-800 rolls to final assembly for airplane systems, horizontal stabilizer and vertical tail installation.

30 Jun 1997: The first 737-800 debuts at a ceremonial rollout on the north end of the 737 final assembly factory. A crowd of several thousand Boeing Commercial Airplane employees are on hand to witness the premiere of the 129-feet-6-inch airplane — the longest 737 ever built. The first 737-800 is the 2,906th 737 built and the 6,508th commercial airplane built by Boeing in Renton.

31 Jul 1997: The 737-800 makes its first flight, with Boeing Capts. Mike Hewett and Jim McRoberts at the airplane’s controls. At 9 a.m. PDT, the 129-foot, 6-inch 737-800 takes off from Renton Municipal Airport in Renton, Wash., as Boeing employees cheer. After heading north over Lake Washington, the pilots fly north to the Straits of Juan de Fuca and conduct a series of flight tests between there and Tatoosh. Three hours and five minutes later, the airplane lands at Boeing Field in Seattle.

17 Dec 1997: Boeing delivers the first Next-Generation 737-700 to launch customer Southwest Airlines. The event is marked by a brief ceremony at Boeing Field. The airplane later departs for Love Field in Dallas, Texas.

23 Jul 2000: The first Next-Generation 737-900 stars in a ceremonial rollout at the Renton factory. Employees of launch customer Alaska Airlines and Boeing employees who worked on the 737-900 program attend the event.

12 Jan 2001: First production 737 “blended” winglets arrive in Seattle, Wash.

14 Feb 2001: The first shipset of “blended” winglets is installed during production of a Next-Generation 737 at the Renton, Wash. factory.

14 May 2004: The 1,500th Next-Generation 737 is delivered to ATA Airlines. The Next-Generation 737 family reached this milestone delivery in less time than any other commercial airplane family, six years after the delivery of the first model. The Next-Generation 737 bested the previous record holder, the Classic 737 series, by four years.

17 Jan 2005: Final assembly time for Next-Generation 737 is cut to 11 days, making it the shortest final assembly time of any large commercial jet. The feat marks a 50 percent reduction in assembly time since the implementation of Lean tactics began in late 1999.

13 Feb 2006: Delivery of the 5,000th 737.

8 Aug 2006: Rollout of first 737-900ER.

7 Feb 2014 Boeing raise 737 production to 42 aircraft a month

13 Mar 2015 New Panel Assembly Line introduced for building wing panels to reduce 737 assembly time

Top Photo: Jim Anderson/Boeing.

Boeing 737 Operators Slide Show: AG Airline Slide Show

Video:

VietJet Air to add Boeing aircraft

Boeing (Chicago, Seattle and Charleston) has issued this statement about a possible new customer in VietJet Air (Ho Chi Minh City):

Boeing logo (medium)

Boeing and VietJet Air have announced the companies’ intention to collaborate and expand the airline’s future fleet with Boeing airplanes.

VietjetAir.com logo

The memorandum of collaboration signing event was hosted by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and witnessed by H.E Nguyen Phu Trong, General Secretary of Vietnam Communist Party, along with other Vietnamese and U.S. government officials.

“Boeing is honored to start this new partnership with VietJet,” said Dr. Dinesh Keskar, senior vice president, Asia Pacific and India Sales, Boeing Commercial Airplanes. “We look forward to providing VietJet with the very best airplanes in the world such as the 737 MAX and growing this relationship for many years to come.”

VietJet Air, is a privately held, low-cost airline in Vietnam, with headquarters in Ho Chi Minh City is currently a loyal Airbus customer.

Videos: VietJet Air.

VietJet Air aircraft slide show: AG Airline Slide Show

Korean Air signs MOU for 20 Boeing 737 MAXs and two additional 777-300 ERs

Boeing (Chicago, Seattle and Charleston) and Korean Air (Seoul) today announced the airline’s intent to purchase 30 737 MAXs and two additional 777-300 ER (Extended Range) jetliners, with options for an additional 20 737 MAXs. The agreement is valued at approximately $3.9 billion at current list prices. Boeing will work with Korean Air to finalize the order, at which time the order will be posted to the Orders & Deliveries website.

Korean Air logo

With this commitment Korean Air is poised to become a new 737 MAX customer when this order, which includes MAX 8s and substitution rights for MAX 9s, is finalized. With this commitment, the Korean flag carrier will increase the size of its unfilled orders with Boeing to 69 airplanes.

Today’s agreement, which also includes two additional 777-300 ERs (above) for Korean Air, comes on the heels of the airline’s order for five 777 Freighters earlier this year, raising Korean Air’s total orders and commitments with Boeing in the first six months of 2015 to 37 airplanes.

Korean Air currently operates a fleet of 87 Boeing passenger airplanes that consist of 737, 747 and 777 airplanes. The airline also operates an all-Boeing cargo fleet of 27 747-400, 747-8 and 777 Freighters.

Korean Air’s Aerospace Division is a key Boeing partner on both the 747-8 and 787 programs, supplying the distinctive raked wing-tips for each model. They are also one of two suppliers producing the new 737 MAX Advanced Technology (AT) Winglet.

 

Korean Air, with a fleet of 159 aircraft, is one of the world’s top 20 airlines, and operates more than 430 flights per day to 129 cities in 46 countries. It is a founding member of the SkyTeam alliance, which together with its 20 members, offers its 612 million annual passengers a worldwide system of more than 16,000 daily flights covering 1,052 destinations in 177 countries.

Top Copyright Photo: Bruce Drum/AirlinersGallery.com. Boeing 777-3B5 HL8217 (msn 37648) approaches the runway in Las Vegas.

Korean Air aircraft slide show: AG Airline Slide Show

AG Prints-6 Sizes

Fast-growing Ruili Airlines commits to purchase 30 Boeing 737 MAX aircraft

Boeing (Chicago, Seattle and Charleston) and Ruili Airlines (Kunming, Yunnan, China) today announced at the Paris Air Show that the airline has committed to purchase 30 737 MAXs with the financial support of AVIC International Leasing, amid a surge in China’s passenger traffic.

The commitment, valued at $3.2 billion at current list prices, will be subject to the approval of the Chinese government and will be posted on Boeing’s Orders & Deliveries website once all contingencies are cleared.

Currently, Ruili Airlines operates 34 daily flights on 11 scheduled routes with a fleet of five Boeing 737 airplanes. According to its development plan, the start-up carrier will expand its fleet to seven aircraft by the end of this year and 26 by 2020.

Ruili logo

Ruili Airlines obtained its public air transport enterprise business license from the Civil Aviation Administration of China (CAAC) in February 2014, marking the formal establishment of the carrier. The start-up airline is the first private carrier approved by CAAC after the regulator relaxed restrictions on new carriers in 2013.

Copyright Photo: Ton Jochems/AirlinersGallery.com. Ruili Airlines already operates both the Boeing 737-700 and the 737-800. The pictured Boeing 737-86J D-ABMX (msn 37786) became B-1960 on delivery.