Category Archives: AFA

Air Traffic Controllers, Pilots, Flight Attendants detail serious safety concerns due to shutdown

On Day 33 of the government shutdown, National Air Traffic Controllers Association (NATCA) President Paul Rinaldi, Air Line Pilots Association (ALPA) President Joe DePete, and Association of Flight Attendants-CWA (AFA) President Sara Nelson released the following statement:

“We have a growing concern for the safety and security of our members, our airlines, and the traveling public due to the government shutdown. This is already the longest government shutdown in the history of the United States and there is no end in sight. In our risk averse industry, we cannot even calculate the level of risk currently at play, nor predict the point at which the entire system will break. It is unprecedented.

“Due to the shutdown, air traffic controllers, transportation security officers, safety inspectors, air marshals, federal law enforcement officers, FBI agents, and many other critical workers have been working without pay for over a month. Staffing in our air traffic control facilities is already at a 30-year low and controllers are only able to maintain the system’s efficiency and capacity by working overtime, including 10-hour days and 6-day workweeks at many of our nation’s busiest facilities. Due to the shutdown, the FAA has frozen hiring and shuttered its training academy, so there is no plan in effect to fill the FAA’s critical staffing need. Even if the FAA were hiring, it takes two to four years to become fully facility certified and achieve Certified Professional Controller (CPC) status. Almost 20% of CPCs are eligible to retire today. There are no options to keep these professionals at work without a paycheck when they can no longer afford to support their families. When they elect to retire, the National Airspace System (NAS) will be crippled.

“The situation is changing at a rapid pace. Major airports are already seeing security checkpoint closures, with many more potentially to follow. Safety inspectors and federal cyber security staff are not back on the job at pre-shutdown levels, and those not on furlough are working without pay. Last Saturday, TSA management announced that a growing number of officers cannot come to work due to the financial toll of the shutdown. In addition, we are not confident that system-wide analyses of safety reporting data, which is used to identify and implement corrective actions in order to reduce risks and prevent accidents is 100 percent operational due to reduced FAA resources.

“As union leaders, we find it unconscionable that aviation professionals are being asked to work without pay and in an air safety environment that is deteriorating by the day. To avoid disruption to our aviation system, we urge Congress and the White House to take all necessary steps to end this shutdown immediately. “

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AFA issues a demand for an Ebola protection “checklist” for flight attendants

AFA Logo

The Association of Flight Attendants-CWA (AFA), the world’s largest Flight Attendant union representing nearly 60,000 Flight Attendants at 19 carriers, has notified Ebola Response Coordinator Ron Klain and key federal agencies overseeing aviation safety and health of protective and response measures needed to support aviation’s first responders and safe air travel.

AFA’s checklist includes responsible actions for managing and containing communicable diseases. By focusing efforts on prevention for all crewmembers, aircraft cleaning, and a collaborative response plan with airline management in the event of an Ebola exposure in-flight, AFA is leading efforts to minimize, contain, and eradicate the risk of Ebola from being further spread through civil aviation.

Here is the checklist demands:

Ebola and Other Communicable Disease Incident Response Checklists

AFA calls for the federal agencies overseeing aviation safety and health to require that all airlines comply with the following measures.

Prevention for All Crew Members

  •  Provide an adequate supply for every Flight Attendant on all flights of non- allergenic gloves and masks that are determined appropriate protection by the CDC and/or WHO.
  •  Provide an adequate supply of medical gloves and masks that are determined appropriate protection by the CDC and/or WHO for any volunteer medical personnel assisting with medical situations.
  •  Ensure each flight has one universal precaution kit for every Flight Attendant on duty plus two additional kits for intervening healthcare personnel. Universal precaution kits should include all items specified by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) as follows:

    Universal precaution kit:
    — Dry powder that can convert small liquid spills into a sterile granulated gel — Germicidal disinfectant for surface cleaning
    — Skin wipes
    — Face/eye mask (separate or combined)
    — Gloves (disposable)
    — Protective apron

  •  Permit Flight Attendants working on flights to wear gloves anytime during the flight without any discriminatory or disciplinary actions being taken against them.
  •  Issue guidance to all crew in the event that a passenger exhibits signs or symptoms of infectious disease during a flight.
  •  Require pre-flight briefings to communicate the use of universal precaution procedures and equipment to prevent exposure on a flight and to review guidance in the event that a passenger exhibits signs or symptoms of infectious disease during a flight.
  •  Provide an adequate supply of masks and sick bags for any passengers who exhibit symptoms on a flight.
  •  Provide an airsick bag that is immediately available for each passenger.
  •  Ensure all aircraft meet the federal requirements for access to soap and running

    water.

  •  Provide on all flights equipment necessary to take temperatures of potentially

    infected persons without requiring physical contact with those individuals.

  •  It is a federal requirement to have running water, soap and clean towels on every

    flight – but if a flight is scheduled to leave in violation of this regulation then the airline should ensure Flight Attendant(s) has the ability to wash hands with running water and soap prior to departure of every flight and provision a sufficient quantity of sanitary alcohol-based wipes.

  •  Make all of the above stated supplies a no-go item (required for aircraft dispatch).

Aircraft Cleaning

Require airlines to follow CDC recommended guidelines for cleaning aircraft and any contaminated areas after a flight with a sick traveler who may have Ebola or other communicable diseases, including protection and training for the aircraft cleaners.

Crew Members on a Flight with Infected Passenger

  •  Immediately lock-down crew names, similar to an airline incident/accident.
  •  Immediately contact the union leadership with the names, cell phone numbers,

    current locations, and in-sheltering locations of impacted crewmembers.

  •  Coordinate with the crewmembers union leadership around any issues related to

    care and protection of the crew.

  •  Immediately remove crew with pay and benefits for the entire disease incubation

    period.

  •  Provide all resources necessary to safely in-shelter the crewmembers during the

    incubation period; for example, safe and secure location with meals and medical supplies provided, including, but not limited to, thermometers for self-monitoring and protective masks.

  •  Cover all medical costs related to potential exposure, including, but not limited to, tests, doctor visits, and medications.
  •  Once the in-sheltering period is over, provide transportation to the crewmember’s choice of base or home.
  •  Provide an external (non-airline employee) mental health professional who can make daily confidential telephonic wellness calls to the in-sheltering crewmember. Crewmembers may accept or decline calls at their own discretion.
  •  Within 8 hours of knowledge of the incident, the company and union will implement the communications plan.

    Management Plan Checklist

  •  Establish an unrestricted, transparent, and confidential on-going communication flow plan between the company, union(s), and managing public health authorities.
  •  The company and the union(s) will develop a joint communications plan, including message templates, to be used in the event of a communicable disease related incident aboard an aircraft.
  •  Establish a plan for in-sheltering of crewmembers following a communicable disease related incident aboard an aircraft.

AFA works to build a coalition to fight the U.S. operations of Norwegian Long Haul

AFA-Association of Flight Attendants logo

The Association of Flight Attendants-CWA (AFA) has issued this statement against Norwegian hiring U.S.-based Flight Attendants:

The Association of Flight Attendants-CWA (AFA) today met with a broad labor coalition and government representatives from Norway to discuss the detrimental effects Norwegian Air International’s attempt to bypass international labor laws will have on aviation workers around the world. AFA, part of a delegation comprised of union representatives, issued the following statement concerning current hiring practices by Norwegian Air International:

“Today we joined our aviation colleagues and industry leaders to discuss strategies and alternatives that would ensure Norwegian does not erode labor laws or the careers of U.S. Flight Attendants as they work to expand their business.

“History has shown that when companies find a way to take advantage of loopholes that assist in evading strong labor provisions, a global race to the bottom begins, leaving behind workers and communities. For nearly 70 years, AFA has been dedicated to protecting the Flight Attendant career, standing against any attempt to create a position that has little room for advancement and no job security. We are concerned that Norwegian’s announcement to hire U.S.-based Flight Attendants to staff international flights undercuts labor laws, paying outsourced workers a fraction of what Norwegian Flight Attendants earn.

“For decades, AFA has worked closely with our counterparts across the world for global labor standards that protect careers and enhance aviation growth. While we are dedicated to creating opportunities that expand business, it is imperative that airlines work collaboratively with unions and workers so that everyone is able to share in the success.

“AFA remains dedicated to our long-standing mission of uniting all Flight Attendants, regardless of carrier. We stand in unity with our counterparts at Norwegian in their fight to retain good jobs. Norwegian’s attempt to outsource Flight Attendant positions, not only bypasses Norway’s labor laws that protect workers, but it erodes careers of U.S. Flight Attendants who have worked for nearly seven decades to build an enduring career.

“In our global aviation environment, it is imperative that we all work together to ensure that workers are treated fairly and are recognized for the role they have in their airline’s success.”