Category Archives: Aeroflot Russian Airlines

Aeroflot restores the Moscow – Guangzhou route

Aeroflot Russian Airlines restored the Moscow – Guangzhou route on June 6.

The restored route operates one day a week.

Aeroflot is still contained in where it can fly internationally.

Aeroflot (SkyTeam) serves 65 domestic destinations and 30 international destinations in 17 countries, as of June 2022.

While European countries have closed their airspace to Aeroflot, many other countries, including Turkey, Israel, Egypt and India have not. Therefore Aeroflot is able to patchwork an international network, mainly to the south and the east of Moscow.

Map of banned airspace:

https://www.bloomberg.com/graphics/2022-russia-ukraine-flight-bans/

Where does Aeroflot currently fly internationally?

Armenia

Yerevan EVN

Azerbaijan

Baku GYD

Belarus

Minsk MSQ
China
Guangzhou CAN

Egypt

Cairo CAI

India

Delhi DEL
Iran
Tehran IKA

Israel

Tel Aviv TLV

Kazakhstan

Aktau SCO
Aktobe AKX
Almaty ALA
Atyrau GUW
Karaganda KGF
Kostanay KSN
Nur-Sultan NQZ
Krygyzstan
Bishkek FRU
Osh OSS
Tamchy IKU

Maldives

Malé MLE
Seychelles
Mahé SEZ

Sri Lanka

Colombo CMB

Turkey

Antalya AYT
Bodrum BJV
Dalaman DLM
Istanbul IST
Ukraine (occupied Crimea)
Simferopol SIP

Uzbekistan

Bukhara BHK
Samarkand SKD
Tashkent TAS
Urgench UGC

 

Aeroflot aircraft photo gallery:

 

SkyTeam boots (suspends) Aeroflot

SkyTeam and Aeroflot have agreed to temporarily suspend the airline’s SkyTeam membership.

SkyTeam is the alliance dedicated to providing passengers with a more seamless travel experience at every step of their journey. 19 member airlines working together across an extensive global network to welcome 676 million customers each year on more than 15,445 daily flights to 1,036 destinations in 170 countries.

Aeroflot Group shows only a 20.4% decline in traffic in March

Aeroflot Group issued this traffic report for March:

Aeroflot Group operating results for March 2022

Key highlights of March 2022:

  • Aeroflot Group carried 2.2 million passengers, 20.4% down year-on-year;
  • 2.0 million passengers carried in domestic segment, 15.7% down year-on-year;
  • Aeroflot Group’s passenger load factor was 79.5%, a 3.3 percentage point decrease year-on-year;
  • Pobeda Airlines carried 910.9 thousand passengers; passenger load factor was 92.2%.

Aeroflot Group Operating Results

Aeroflot Airlines

March 2022

March

2021

Change

3M 2022

3M 2021

Change

Passengers carried, thousand PAX

836.7

1,232.9

(32.1%)

3,763.7

3,270.2

15.1%

– international

137.2

284.3

(51.7%)

1,276.1

676.8

88.6%

– domestic

699.5

948.6

(26.3%)

2,487.6

2,593.4

(4.1%)

Revenue Passenger Kilometres, mn

2,259.0

2,921.9

(22.7%)

10,136.1

7,625.8

32.9%

– international

497.2

1,008.1

(50.7%)

4,601.2

2,470.7

86.2%

– domestic

1,761.8

1,913.8

(7.9%)

5,534.9

5,155.1

7.4%

Available Seat Kilometres, mn

3,096.0

3,785.4

(18.2%)

14,696.2

10,337.0

42.2%

– international

720.1

1,436.8

(49.9%)

7,353.4

3,724.9

97.4%

– domestic

2,375.9

2,348.6

1.2%

7,342.8

6,612.1

11.1%

Passenger load factor, %

73.0%

77.2%

(4.2 p.p.)

69.0%

73.8%

(4.8 p.p.)

– international

69.0%

70.2%

(1.1 p.p.)

62.6%

66.3%

(3.8 p.p.)

– domestic

74.2%

81.5%

(7.3 p.p.)

75.4%

78.0%

(2.6 p.p.)

Revenue flights

6,517.0

9,569.0

(31.9%)

29,910

27,397

9.2%

– international

883.0

2,021.0

(56.3%)

9,866

5,313

85.7%

– domestic

5,634.0

7,548.0

(25.4%)

20,044

22,084

(9.2%)

Flight hours

19,784

25,802

(23.3%)

91,825

73,156

25.5%

Pobeda Airlines

March 2022

March

2021

Change

3M 2022

3M 2021

Change

Passengers carried, thousand PAX

910.9

982.3

(7.3%)

3,109.3

2,755.0

12.9%

– international

23.4

59.8

(60.8%)

242.6

160.5

51.1%

– domestic

887.5

922.4

(3.8%)

2,866.8

2,594.5

10.5%

Revenue Passenger Kilometres, mn

1,853.3

1,630.1

13.7%

5,714.4

4,581.8

24.7%

– international

85.1

147.3

(42.2%)

670.5

395.2

69.7%

– domestic

1,768.2

1,482.8

19.2%

5,043.9

4,186.7

20.5%

Available Seat Kilometres, mn

2,010.2

1,739.0

15.6%

6,231.8

4,969.6

25.4%

– international

101.8

161.2

(36.8%)

775.9

467.1

66.1%

– domestic

1,908.4

1,577.8

21.0%

5,455.9

4,502.5

21.2%

Passenger load factor, %

92.2%

93.7%

(1.5 p.p.)

91.7%

92.2%

(0.5 p.p.)

– international

83.6%

91.4%

(7.8 p.p.)

86.4%

84.6%

1.8 p.p.

– domestic

92.7%

94.0%

(1.3 p.p.)

92.4%

93.0%

(0.5 p.p.)

Revenue flights

5,249

5,579

(5.9%)

17,954

15,844

13.3%

– international

150

348

(56.9%)

1,477

1,008

46.5%

– domestic

5,099

5,231

(2.5%)

16,477

14,836

11.1%

Flight hours

14,284

12,470

14.5%

44,634

35,780

24.7%

Rossiya Airlines

March 2022

March

2021

Change

3M 2022

3M 2021

Change

Passengers carried, thousand PAX

456.1

554.0

(17.7%)

1,631.0

1,345.3

21.2%

– international

28.8

35.0

(17.8%)

275.9

67.6

4.1х

– domestic

427.3

519.0

(17.7%)

1,355.1

1,277.7

6.1%

Revenue Passenger Kilometres, mn

1,150.6

1,209.9

(4.9%)

4,094.9

3,035.4

34.9%

– international

148.7

108.6

36.9%

1,087.9

206.1

5.3х

– domestic

1,001.9

1,101.3

(9.0%)

3,007.0

2,829.3

6.3%

Available Seat Kilometres, mn

1,513.3

1,432.3

5.7%

5,224.4

3,728.3

40.1%

– international

169.5

123.2

37.5%

1,273.8

236.3

5.4х

– domestic

1,343.9

1,309.1

2.7%

3,950.5

3,492.0

13.1%

Passenger load factor, %

76.0%

84.5%

(8.4 p.p.)

78.4%

81.4%

(3.0 p.p.)

– international

87.7%

88.1%

(0.4 p.p.)

85.4%

87.2%

(1.8 p.p.)

– domestic

74.6%

84.1%

(9.6 p.p.)

76.1%

81.0%

(4.9 p.p.)

Revenue flights

4,645

4,975

(6.6%)

16,093

11,892

35.3%

– international

146

292

(50.0%)

1,714

583

2.9х

– domestic

4,499

4,683

(3.9%)

14,379

11,309

27.1%

Flight hours

11,501

11,975

(4.0%)

40,525

29,089

39.3%

 

Aeroflot Group Operating Results

March 2022

March

2021

Change

3M 2022

3M 2021

Change

Passengers carried, thousand PAX

2,203.7

2,769.2

(20.4%)

8,504.0

7,370.5

15.4%

– international

189.4

379.2

(50.0%)

1,794.6

904.9

98.3%

– domestic

2,014.3

2,390.0

(15.7%)

6,709.5

6,465.6

3.8%

Revenue Passenger Kilometres, mn

5,262.9

5,761.8

(8.7%)

19,945.5

15,243.1

30.8%

– international

730.9

1,264.0

(42.2%)

6,359.6

3,072.0

2.1х

– domestic

4,531.9

4,497.9

0.8%

13,585.8

12,171.1

11.6%

Available Seat Kilometres, mn

6,619.6

6,956.7

(4.8%)

26,152.4

19,035.0

37.4%

– international

991.4

1,721.2

(42.4%)

9,403.2

4,428.4

2.1х

– domestic

5,628.2

5,235.5

7.5%

16,749.2

14,606.6

14.7%

Passenger load factor, %

79.5%

82.8%

(3.3 p.p.)

76.3%

80.1%

(3.8 p.p.)

– international

73.7%

73.4%

0.3 p.p.

67.6%

69.4%

(1.7 p.p.)

– domestic

80.5%

85.9%

(5.4 p.p.)

81.1%

83.3%

(2.2 p.p.)

Cargo and mail carried, tonnes

12,303.0

22,712.4

(45.8%)

53,376.5

62,199.0

(14.2%)

– international

1,288.9

9,040.6

(85.7%)

19,110.7

24,978.9

(23.5%)

– domestic

11,014.1

13,671.9

(19.4%)

34,265.8

37,220.1

(7.9%)

Revenue Cargo Tonne Kilometres, mn

48.4

103.5

(53.2%)

226.8

275.3

(17.6%)

– international

5.4

53.9

(89.9%)

101.2

144.1

(29.8%)

– domestic

43.0

49.6

(13.4%)

125.7

131.3

(4.3%)

Revenue Tonne Kilometres, mn

522.1

622.0

(16.1%)

2,021.9

1,647.2

22.7%

– international

71.2

167.6

(57.5%)

673.5

420.6

60.2%

– domestic

450.8

454.4

(0.8%)

1,348.4

1,226.7

9.9%

Available Tonne Kilometres, mn

781.9

943.1

(17.1%)

3,177.8

2,567.9

23.7%

– international

135.5

328.4

(58.7%)

1,262.3

858.3

47.1%

– domestic

646.4

614.6

5.2%

1,915.5

1,709.6

12.0%

Revenue load factor, %

66.8%

66.0%

0.8 p.p.

63.6%

64.1%

(0.5 p.p.)

– international

52.6%

51.0%

1.5 p.p.

53.4%

49.0%

4.4 p.p.

– domestic

69.7%

73.9%

(4.2 p.p.)

70.4%

71.8%

(1.4 p.p.)

Revenue flights

16,411

20,123

(18.4%)

63,957

55,133

16.0%

– international

1,179

2,661

(55.7%)

13,057

6,904

89.1%

– domestic

15,232

17,462

(12.8%)

50,900

48,229

5.5%

Flight hours

45,569

50,247

(9.3%)

176,983

138,025

28.2%

 

BIS takes enforcement actions against three Russian airlines operating aircraft in violation of U.S. export controls, aircraft identified

Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) Assistant Secretary for Export Enforcement Matthew S. Axelrod issued orders denying the export privileges of three Russian Airlines – Aeroflot, Azur Air, and UTair – due to ongoing export violations related to comprehensive export controls on Russia imposed by the Commerce Department. These three Temporary Denial Orders (TDOs) terminate the right of these airlines to participate in transactions subject to the Export Administration Regulations (EAR), including exports and reexports from the United States. Today’s TDOs are issued for 180-days and may be renewed.

“The Biden Administration has imposed historic sanctions on the Russia for the unwarranted aggression happening in Ukraine. With today’s temporary denial orders, the Department of Commerce takes another significant action to hold Putin and his enablers accountable for their inexcusable actions,” said Commerce Secretary Gina M. Raimondo. “We are cutting off not only their ability to access items from the United States but also reexports of U.S.-origin items from abroad. Any companies that flout our export controls, specifically those who do so to the benefit of Vladimir Putin and the detriment to the Ukrainian people, will feel the full force of the Department’s enforcement.”

“The images we are seeing coming out of Ukraine demonstrate Vladimir Putin’s barbarism, brutality, and blatant disregard for human life. The Department of Commerce, along with the entire Biden-Harris Administration, have taken swift and unprecedented action to ensure that Russia, and its enablers, pay a price for their actions,” said Deputy Secretary of Commerce Don Graves. “We are already seeing the impact of the Commerce Department’s export controls, with U.S. exports to Russia of items subject to new licensing requirements have decreased by 99 percent by value compared to the same time period last year. With today’s action we send a clear message to those who deliberately disobey those same controls: defy our export controls at your own peril.

“Companies that violate the expansive export controls we have imposed on Russia will find themselves the target of Commerce Department enforcement action,” said Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Export Enforcement Matthew S. Axelrod. “With our allies and partners, we will continue to stand with the people of Ukraine as they respond to Russia’s unprovoked and brutal invasion of their country.”

The TDOs issued represent the first enforcement actions taken by BIS in response to Russia’s unprovoked and brutal invasion of Ukraine, and the severe restriction in export privileges of these companies is a reminder to parties in Russia as well as throughout the rest of the world that U.S. legal authorities are substantial, far-reaching, and can have a meaningful impact on access to global commerce by parties found to be in violation of U.S. law.

BIS has led the Department of Commerce’s efforts in response to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine by taking a number of powerful regulatory actions and issuing public notice to the global community as to potential violations of the EAR in the civilian aerospace sector.

On February 24, 2022, BIS imposed expansive controls on aviation-related items to Russia, including a license requirement for the export, reexport or transfer (in-country) to Russia of any aircraft or aircraft parts on the Commerce Control List.

On March 2, 2022, BIS further excluded any aircraft registered in, owned, or controlled by, or under charter or lease by Russia or a national of Russia from being eligible for license exception Aircraft, Vessels, and Spacecraft (AVS). Accordingly, any U.S.-origin aircraft or foreign aircraft that includes more than 25% controlled U.S.-origin content is subject to a license requirement if, for example, it is Russianowned or operated and exported to Russia.

List of aircraft:

Note: Russia has since re-registered these foreign aircraft to the Russian registry, probably to avoid confiscation and to confuse the situation.

On March 18, 2022, BIS publicly released a list of private and commercial aircraft it had been tracking as likely operating in violation of the EAR. This action notified the public that, absent authorization from BIS, the operation of, or service to, any aircraft on the list or owned by Russian parties in violation of the EAR may lead to enforcement actions from BIS, which may include substantial jail time, fines, loss of export privileges, or other restrictions. BIS further updated the list on April 30, 2022 and will continue to maintain and update the list as circumstances warrant.

The list and additional information on BIS’s actions in response to the Russian invasion is available online here: https://bis.doc.gov/index.php/policy-guidance/country-guidance/russia-belarus.

Aeroflot, Utair, and Azur Air engaged in and continue to engage in recent conduct prohibited by the EAR by operating controlled aircraft subject to the EAR without the required BIS authorization. Pursuant to Section 746.8 of the EAR, all international flights conducted by the aforementioned airlines into Russia would have required export or reexport licenses from BIS. Additionally, any domestic Russian flights by the same airlines on aircraft reexported to Russia after March 2, 2022 without the required BIS license are also in violation of General Prohibition Ten (GP10). GP10 prohibits continuing with transactions knowing that a violation has occurred or is about to occur.

• Aeroflot operated multiple aircraft subject to the EAR, including, but not limited to, on flights into and out of Moscow, Russia from/to Beijing, China; Delhi, India; Antalya and Istanbul, Turkey; and Dubai, United Arab Emirates, respectively. Aeroflot subsequently operated some of the same aircraft on domestic flights between Moscow, Russia and Vladivostok, Russia and Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky, Russia, respectively.

• Azur Air operated multiple aircraft subject to the EAR, including, but not limited to, on flights into and out of Moscow, Russia from/to Antalya, Turkey; Male, Maldives; Dubai, United Arab Emirates; and Nha Trang, Vietnam, respectively. Azur Air subsequently operated some of the same aircraft on domestic flights between Moscow, Russia and Samara, Russia; Irkutsk, Russia; Kaliningrad, Russia; Mineralnye Vody, Russia; and Novosibirsk, Russia, respectively.

• UTair operated multiple aircraft subject to the EAR, including, but not limited to, on flights into and out of Russia from/to Khujand and Dushanbe, Tajikistan; Yerevan, Armenia; Baku and Ganja, Azerbaijan; Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; and Tashkent, Uzbekistan, respectively. UTair subsequently operated some of the same aircraft on domestic flights between Moscow, Russia and Syktykar, Russia and Ukhta, Russia, respectively. Links to the TDOs are available here:

Aeroflot redeploys its international network, will launch flights from Sochi to six countries

Aeroflot Russian Airlines Sukhoi Superjet 100-95B RA-89014 (msn 95025) SVO (OSDU). Image: 921776.

Aeroflot Russian Airlines is being forced to realign its international network due to Putin’s invasion of Ukraine and western sanctions, especially airspace closures to Russian aircraft.

Aeroflot will now fly from Sochi in southern Russia to six countries and 17 destinations.

The aircraft will be operated by Rossiya.

Using its shorter-range Sukhoi  SuperJet 100s, Aeroflot will operate from Sochi to Armenia (Yerevan), Egypt (Cairo), Israel (Tel Aviv), Kazakhstan (Aktau, Aktobe, Almaty, Atyrau, Nur Sultan), Turkey (Antalya, Bodrum, Dalaman, Istanbul) and Uzbekistan (Bukhara, Samarkand, Tashkent, Urgench, Ferghana).

The international flights will connect to hubs in Moscow (Sheremetyevo), St. Petersburg and Krasnoyarsk.

Aeroflot is avoiding using foreign leased Airbus and Boeing aircraft on the routes due to a real fear of seizure.

 

Aeroflot issued this statement:

Aeroflot has opened sales of tickets for direct regular flights from Sochi to Armenia, Egypt, Israel, Kazakhstan, Turkey, and Uzbekistan. The flight program is focused on transit passenger traffic and caters to those travelling on routes via Sochi from base airports of the Aeroflot Group airlines in Moscow (Sheremetyevo), Saint-Petersburg, Krasnoyarsk.

Flights from Sochi to 17 destinations will be operated by Rossiya Airlines (a subsidiary of Aeroflot Group) on domestically-produced Superjet 100 aircraft. Up to ten airliners of this type will be based in Sochi to operate the flight program. 

Destination

Frequency of flights

(per week)

Flights launch date

Country City
Armenia  Yerevan 7 8 April
Egypt  Cairo 7 7  April
Israel Tel Aviv 7 7  April
Kazakhstan Aktau 3 8  April
Aktobe 3 7  April
Almaty 7 8  April
Atyrau 2 9  April
Nur-Sultan 7 7  April
Turkey Antalya 14 7  April
Bodrum 3 22  April
Dalaman 2 22  April
Istanbul 19 7  April
 

 

Uzbekistan

Bukhara 3 7  April
Samarkand 4 8  April
Tashkent 7 8  April
Urgench 2 8  April
Fergana 3 7  April

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aeroflot will continue to explore the perspective of the development of international flights program from Sochi as well as from other cities of Russia.

Previous worldwide route map (now shrunk to six countries):

Previous Route Map to Western Europe:

Top Copyright Photo: Aeroflot Russian Airlines Sukhoi Superjet 100-95B RA-89014 (msn 95025) SVO (OSDU). Image: 921776.

Aeroflot aircraft slide show:

Aeroflot aircraft photo gallery:

 

Aeroflot uses its SuperJet 100s on foreign routes, the economic and sanctions fallout of Russia’s war in Ukraine

The Russian economy is in free fall. The Russian ruble is worth less than a penny.

Russian airlines mainly now fly on domestic routes. There is very little growth potential for them as long as Putin continues his savage attack on Ukraine.

Aeroflot is now pushing ticket sales to international destinations it can still fly to with its Sukhoi SuperJet 100s to avoid their western leased aircraft from being seized.

Aeroflot resumed regular flights to Bishkek and Osh (Kyrgyzstan). Starting on March 14, flights to Bishkek and Osh will be operated daily.

Aeroflot has opened sales of tickets for daily regular flights to Baku. Flights to the capital of Azerbaijan will be operated on Sukhoi SuperJet 100 aircraft, starting from  March 21, 2022 on the following schedule (local times):

Flight

Route

Departure

Arrival

SU1854

Moscow (SVO-С) — Baku

11:00

15:40

SU1855

Baku — Moscow (SVO-C)

16:40

19:20

Aeroflot has also opened sales of tickets for daily regular flights to Yerevan. Aeroflot flights to Armenia will resume from March 22, 2022 and will be operated on Sukhoi SuperJet 100 aircraft on the following schedule (local times):

Flight

Route

Departure

Arrival

SU1966

Moscow (SVO-С) — Yerevan

00:10

05:15

SU1967

Yerevan — Moscow (SVO-C)

06:15

09:20

Have fun in Armenia and Azerbaijan!

From 60 Minutes:

Further western sanctions are being discussed:

Impact of sanctions on Russia, Moscow’s Sheremetyevo International Airport lays off 7,000 staff members

Moscow’s Sheremetyevo International Airport, due to western sanctions and blocked airspace, has been forced to lay off 7,000 employees.

Previously Sheremetyevo International Airport, in order to optimize and concentrate activities in the Northern Terminal Complex (Terminals B and C), suspended passenger service at Terminal D from 00.00 Moscow time on March 15 this year.

The transfer of airline flights from Terminal D will be carried out according to the schedule to Terminal B and Terminal C, respectively. Airlines and commercial partners are informed in advance of upcoming changes.

International flights of Belavia, Aircompany Armenia, Vietnam Airlines, Corendon Airlines, Korean Air, MIAT Mongolian Airlines, Aeroflot (flights to the EAEU), Cham Wings Airlines, Air India, Air Serbia for arrival and departure from Terminal D will be transferred to Terminal C.

Domestic flights of Aeroflot, Rossiya Airlines, Pobeda, Yamal, Ikar, Nordwind Airlines, Severstal airlines will be served at Terminal B.

Will Russian airlines return their leased airliners?

Russia is apparently planning to block their airlines from returning (stealing?) Western airliners leased to their airlines.

This will be a major hit to aircraft leasing companies.

From Reuters:

“Russia published a draft law on Thursday that could prevent its airlines returning leased aircraft, raising the stakes in a showdown with Western finance over $10 billion of jets.”

Reporting by Reuters Editing by David Goodman and Mark Potter

Aircraft lessors face legal quagmire as Russian plane repos stall

Will Russia nationalize the leased airliners that Russian airlines operate? A legal quagmire is developing for western aircraft leasing companies.

From Reuters:

https://www.reuters.com/markets/europe/lessors-face-legal-quagmire-russian-plane-repos-stall-2022-03-09/