Tag Archives: 737

Chrono Aviation adds its first Boeing 737-200

Chrono Aviation has added and unveiled its first Boeing 737-200. It is largest jet to ever be based at Saint-Hubert Airport in Quebec, Canada.

The first Boeing 737 is the pictured Boeing 737-219C C-GTVO (msn 22994) and was originally delivered to Air New Zealand as ZK-NQC on December 2, 1982.

The company unveiled the new type on social media:

The morning of August 30, 2018 at the Aéroport Montréal Saint-Hubert Longueuil (AMSL), Chrono Aviation unveiled its first Boeing 737-200.

With this acquisition, Chrono Aviation becomes one of the few companies to offer an aircraft of that size for chartering. The jet can carry around 120 passengers or various combinations of passengers and cargo.

The addition of this first 737-200 to our fleet marks an important step in our company’s growth and allows us to strengthen our position at the head of the air charter industry in Québec.

The plane is the first Boeing in a fleet set to expand rapidly—as a matter of fact, a second 737 200 is coming in November. Chrono is investing over $12 million into its two aircraft to completely refurbish them, paint them in the company’s trademark matte black and build entirely new interiors for them.

Since the company was founded, Chrono’s distinctive matte black planes have stood out in the North American aviation industry. “Whether in Québec, Canada or the US, people notice our planes and talk about them,” said Dany Gagnon, Vice-President of Chrono Aviation. “As you can imagine, the 737, being three times the size of the Dash 8, is going to turn a lot of heads!” With a 737 to its name—and a second one coming soon—Chrono Aviation continues its meteoric rise to the pinnacle of Canada’s aviation industry, which it started nearly six years ago now.

Chrono Aviation was founded in Québec City in 2012. Chrono Aviation is an ambitious and innovative company that specializes in air charter. The company is based in Montréal, Québec City and Rimouski, and its primary mission is to provide passengers with a superior level of safety. It stands out from the competition by offering an upmarket service with modern, cutting-edge aircraft. After only six years in business, Chrono Aviation has over 107 employees and a fleet of 14 aircraft. In recent years, the company received two prestigious awards at the annual Fidéides gala, a Trophée Vision and an award at the Mercuriades. Chrono Aviation continues to expand and strengthen its position at the head of the air charter industry in Québec.

All photos by Chrono Aviation.

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Southwest Airlines introduces a new “Disney Pixar Coco” logo jet

Coco plane. Southwest Airlines. Stephen M. Keller

Southwest Airlines is celebrating Disney∙Pixar’s all-new, big-screen adventure “Coco” in high-flying style this fall with a comprehensive program that includes a Boeing 737-700 aircraft emblazoned with the vibrant “Coco” logo and artwork inspired by the film.

The aircraft will fly among the carrier’s nearly 100 destinations throughout the United States, Mexico, Central America, and Caribbean through the end of 2017.  As the largest domestic carrier in the U.S. serving more than 115 million passengers yearly*, Southwest Airlines connects People every day to what is important in their lives.  With Disney∙Pixar’s “Coco,” Southwest connects its Customers to an all-new story that’s both exciting and inspiring. The film opens in U.S. theaters on Nov. 22, 2017.

*Based on latest U.S. Dept of Transportation data of O&D passengers.

Southwest's 2017 "Disney Pixar Coco" promotional livery

Above Copyright Photo:  Southwest Airlines Boeing 737-7L9 WL N7816B (msn 28009) (Disney Pixar Coco) SAN (James Helbock). Image: 939639.

“‘Coco’ is about a boy with big dreams and a strong connection to his family,” says Director Lee Unkrich. “These themes really lend themselves to teaming up with a company like Southwest. And after working for nearly six years to bring this story to life, we were all so excited to see ‘Coco’ on the side of an airplane.”

Customers are encouraged to spot the “Coco” plane and share their photos using #CocoAndSouthwest.  Southwest is also giving families the opportunity to enter for a chance to send their family on an adventure of a lifetime by entering the Southwest Family Flyaway sweepstakes between October 1-25, 2017, to win roundtrip air travel for four to Los Angeles; four tickets to the Disney∙Pixar “Coco” U.S. premiere and party on November 8, 2017; a two-night stay at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel in Hollywood; and a $1,000 VISA® gift card for travel expenses.  To view the full rules and to enter, visit familyflyaway.com.

Additionally, Southwest is sharing the adventures of “Coco” with Customers onboard flights beginning Nov. 1, with the launch of the Disney∙Pixar “Coco” OnDemand Channel, featuring complimentary movie clips and trailers to get everyone excited about “Coco” in 3D this Thanksgiving. Be sure to tune-in ahead of the film’s Nov. 22 theatrical debut.

Later this fall, the music of “Coco” will come to life onboard the “Coco” aircraft with a Live at 35® inflight concert performance by Anthony Gonzalez, who voices Miguel in the movie. Customers will experience the sounds and culture up-close and in-the-moment as Anthony sings a song from the upcoming film accompanied by a guitarist.

Photos: Southwest Airlines.

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Boeing completes a successful first flight of the new 737 MAX 9

The Boeing 737 MAX 9 on April 13, 2017 completed its first flight in the skies above Puget Sound. The 737 MAX program achieved the milestone on schedule, beginning a comprehensive flight-test program leading to certification and delivery.

The airplane completed a successful 2 hour, 42-minute flight, taking off from Renton Field in Renton, Wash., at 10:52 a.m. local time and landing at 1:34 p.m. at Seattle’s Boeing Field.

Piloted by Boeing Test & Evaluation Capts. Christine Walsh and Ed Wilson, the airplane performed tests on flight controls, systems and handling qualities. The MAX 9 will now undergo comprehensive flight testing before customer deliveries begin in 2018.

The 737 MAX 9 is the second member of Boeing’s industry leading 737 MAX family, with a maximum capacity of 220 passengers and a range of 3,515 nautical miles.

Photo: Boeing.

Flybondi selects the Boeing 737-800 as its launch aircraft

Flybondi (flybondi.com) (Buenos Aires), a new low-cost carrier in Argentina, has selected the Boeing 737-800 as its launch aircraft. The new carrier is planning to launch operations in September 2017.

The new airline would also like to add the Boeing 737 MAX 200.

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Gol introduces its #VoaCanarinho logo jet

Gol Linhas Aereas has rolled out this Boeing 737-8EH registered PR-GUK (msn 35852) on March 3, 2017. The new logo jet is named #VoaCanarinho because of the yellow canary on the tail.

The airline and Confederação Brasileira de Futebol renewed their partnership for four more years.

#Voacanarinho!

Gol is the official airline of the Brazilian National Football Team.

Photos: Gol.

Lufthansa’s last Boeing 737-300 makes it to Sanford, Florida

Lufthansa Boeing 737-330 D-ABEC (msn 25149) NUE (Gunter Mayer). Image: 936542.

As previously reported, on October 31, 2016 Lufthansa issued this statement:

On October 31, 2016 Lufthansa said goodbye to its Boeing 737 fleet after 48 years. This marks the end of an era for Lufthansa, spanning almost 50 years.

A Boeing 737-300, with registration D-ABEC (named “Karlsruhe”) (above), flew from Frankfurt to Hamburg on the morning on October 31, 2016 on special flight LH9922, where Lufthansa’s Boeing 737 fleet is to be officially bid farewell during a joint event with Lufthansa Technik. After a special ceremony, Captain and Fleet Commander Ulrich Pade and his crew flew back to Frankfurt, with a group of media representatives as well as a number of employees on board; the flight was scheduled to land at 5.10 pm local time.

Over the decades, Lufthansa has had a total of 148 Boeing 737 of almost all generations. At the beginning of the 1960s, the then Chief Executive Officer of Lufthansa Technik, Professor Gerhard Höltje, pushed the project forward and supported the joint development of a short and medium-haul jet with Boeing. The cabin design and the positioning of the engines under the aircraft’s wings were based on the long-haul aircraft of the time.

As an update, the last Lufthansa Boeing 737-300, the pictured 737-330 D-ABEC (msn 25149), made its long journey across the Atlantic Ocean from Frankfurt to Sanford, Florida via Keflavik and Bangor. D-ABEC arrived at Sanford on January 11, 2017.

THere is the transatlantic journey as flight LH9924 according the Flightradar 24:

flightradar-24-fra-sfb-d-abec

Copyright Photo: Lufthansa Boeing 737-330 D-ABEC (msn 25149) NUE (Gunter Mayer). Image: 936542.

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Boeing completely drops its long-standing customer codes for all aircraft types

Jiangxi Air Boeing 737-800 WL B-1558 (msn 42935) BFI (Joe G. Walker). Image: 936425.

Boeing has been moving towards droping its long-standing tradition of using customer codes (i.e. United = 22, American = 23, Lufthansa = 30 as examples) as part of the official aircraft designations (757-222, 737-823, 747-830 etc.) since the Boeing 707.

However with the introduction of the Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner, which was first Boeing type to drop the customer codes (they are simply 787-8s, 787-9s etc.), Boeing has been moving towards a more simplier method of officially designating its aircraft. Now a new method has been adopted by the manufacturer and is being carried forward with all new aircraft including the upcoming Boeing 737 MAX.

According to the Puget Sound – Boeing Test Flights blog;

“Boeing will no longer use customer codes on the 737, 747, 767, 777 lines bringing them in alignment with the 737 MAX and 787 lines. These changes have already been made on the FAA Certificates. The changes are effective with the following Line numbers for each respective Production Line.

737 Line Number 6082 onward will not have a customer code in the designation – for example Southwest’s new 737-8 N8519R is officially a Boeing 737-800 (msn 36910) (not a 737-8H4).

747 Line Number 1534 onward will not have a customer code in the designation (instead it will use the 747-8F or 747-8I designation).

767 Line Number 1102 onward will not have a customer code in the designation – for example FedEx’s new 767-3 N144FE (msn 42726) is now officially a Boeing 767-300F.

777 Line Number 1422 onward will not have a customer code in the designation – for example United’s new 777-3 N2332U is officially a Boeing 777-300ER (msn/ln 62643/1461).

Copyright Photo: Joe G. Walker/AirlinersGallery.com. For example, the pictured Xiangxi Air B-1558 (msn/ln 42935/6220) was delivered by Boeing on December 28, 2016 and is officially a Boeing 737-800 under the revised method.

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