Category Archives: Air New Zealand

From Air New Zealand: How did the kiwi get to New Zealand?

The kiwi is much more than just a native New Zealand bird, it’s an iconic symbol of the nation. Although the kiwi is a bird, kiwi are not able to fly. This isn’t unusual in New Zealand, which is home to more species of flightless birds than anywhere else in the world. The unique location and history of the country has meant historically birds didn’t need to fly to avoid land-based predators, they could happily forage and nest on the ground.

The fact the kiwi could only really have evolved in New Zealand, combined with their quirky characteristics, makes them the perfect symbol to represent the unique characters you’ll meet on a trip to New Zealand.

Although kiwi can’t fly there is one way for them to get up in the air, as Pete the Kiwi found in the video below.

The great kiwi mystery

One mystery that still baffles experts is how the kiwi found its way to New Zealand in the first place. The kiwi’s closest relatives live 1000s of kilometres away in Madagascar and Australia, which is a long journey for a flightless bird travel. Although the kiwi is a strong swimmer, it’s not likely to have paddled all the way.

There’s a few theories as to how the kiwi did it, it might have used stepping stones or small islands that have long since sunk back into the water. It could also have been that kiwi evolved from a New Zealand ancestor that lived millions of years ago, before the many islands on Earth broke away from the main land masses that exist today.

However, one of the strongest theories is that the many years ago an ancestor of the kiwi could still fly, and that over the centuries this ability was lost due to there being no ground-based predators to attack the kiwi.

Kiwi facts

You can find more facts on the New Zealand Department of Conservation website.

  • There are 68,000 kiwi left in New Zealand.
  • The unmanaged kiwi population is declining at a rate of 2% a year because of predators introduced by humans.
  • Kiwi usually live to between 25 and 50 years of age.
  • They are the only bird with nostrils at the tip of the beak, meaning they have a great sense of smell.
  • Their powerful legs make up a third of their bodyweight, making them fast runners.

If you want to learn even more about the kiwi, one option is to fly to New Zealand where you can see them in the wild or in captivity at the many zoos and ecological centres. You can also learn more about this amazing bird and efforts to save them on the Kiwis for Kiwi website.

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Air New Zealand lands in Houston

Air New Zealand flight NZ28 arrives in Houston to a kapa haka performance. (PRNewsFoto/Air New Zealand)

Air New Zealand flight NZ28 arrives in Houston to a kapa haka performance. (PRNewsFoto/Air New Zealand)

Air New Zealand’s (Auckland) inaugural flight to Houston touched down yesterday (December 15) at George Bush Intercontinental Airport. Flight NZ 28 departed Auckland at 6:30 pm on December 14 and arrived in Houston around 1:15pm local time.

The flight, operated by a Boeing 777-200 aircraft, was welcomed to Houston with a performance on the tarmac by a kapa haka group made up of Air New Zealand staff.

Air New Zealand 2012 logo

This week ANZ marks 50 years of flying to the U.S.

Air New Zealand’s Star Alliance partner United Airlines, which has a large Houston-based hub, will code share into Houston from numerous North American cities. A global gateway city, Houston’s George Bush Intercontinental Airport (IAH) provides nonstop service to nearly 200 airports around the globe (113 domestic U.S. destinations).

Air New Zealand will fly between Houston and Auckland up to five times per week, operating its fully-refurbished Boeing 777-200 ER.

With the addition of Houston, Air New Zealand offers direct service to New Zealand from five North American gateways, also including Los Angeles, San Francisco, Vancouver and Honolulu.

The inaugural flight from Houston to Auckland departed yesterday at 8:25 pm (2025) local time.

Photo: Air New Zealand.

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Air New Zealand operates its last regularly-scheduled Boeing 737 flight, will operate a farewell tour

 

Air New Zealand 737-NGI (08-rev 96)(Grd) AKL (CH)(LRW)

Air New Zealand (Auckland) as planned, today (September 6) operated its last regularly-scheduled Boeing 737 revenue flight as flight NZ 557 between Auckland and Christchurch. The last regular flight was operated with Boeing 737-319 ZK-NGI (msn 25608) (above).

However Air New Zealand will operate the aircraft on a Farewell Tour around New Zealand from September 8 through September 21 under the following schedule:

Air New Zealand-75 Years logo

September 8 CHC-IVC ETD 0700 ETA 0800 ANZ 1737
IVC-DUD ETD 1530 ETA 1600 ANZ 1737

September 9 DUD-CHC ETD 1530 ETA 1615 ANZ 1737

September 12 CHC-CHC 6 times ANZ 1731 through ANZ 1736

September 13 CHC-CHC 6 times ANZ 1731 through ANZ 1736

September 14 CHC-WLG ETD 1815 ETA 1900 ANZ 1737

September 15 WLG-WLG 3 times
WLG-NPE ETD 1515 ETA 1600 ANZ 1737

September 16 NPE-TRG ETD 1515 ETA 1600 ANZ 1737

September 17 TRG-AKL ETD 1530 ETA 1600 ANZ 1737

September 19 AKL-AKL 6 times

September 20 AKL-AKL 6 times

September 21 AKL-CHC ETD 1000 ETA 1120 ANZ 6201

As previously reported, Air New Zealand and its associated companies have been a Boeing 737 operator since 1968. National Airways (New Zealand National Airways Corporation) (NAC) (Wellington) took delivery of Boeing 737-219 ZK-NAC (msn 19929) on August 29, 1968, followed by ZK-NAD (msn 19930) on September 11, 1968 and ZK-NAE (msn 19931) on October 5, 1968. NAC was taken over and merged into Air New Zealand on April 1, 1978. At that time ANZ became a Boeing 737 operator.

Top Copyright Photo: Colin Hunter/AirlinersGallery.com. Air New Zealand Boeing 737-3K2 ZK-NGI taxies at a cloudy Auckland.

Air New Zealand aircraft slide show: AG Airline Slide Show

Thank you to Colin Hunter for the above information from New Zealand.

Video: The last ANZ Boeing 737 flight:

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Air New Zealand’s new “Men In Black Safety Defenders” video

Air New Zealand (Auckland) always imaginative, has issued its latest air safety video with the following description:

At Air New Zealand, we’re #CrazyAboutRugby. So for our latest inflight safety video, we called upon some very special Men In Black to brief our passengers.

The flag carrier also issued this statement:

Air New Zealand 2012 logo

Air New Zealand has teamed up with the All Blacks and an all-star line-up of international rugby greats to tackle the airline’s latest on board safety video, Men in Black Safety Defenders.

All Blacks logo

Inspired by the Columbia Pictures global film franchise Men in Black, Air New Zealand’s latest safety installment features All Black’s Captain Richie McCaw and Dan Carter as Men in Black agents.

Starring alongside the two long-serving All Blacks is Coach Steve Hansen , teammates Kieran Read , Keven Mealamu, Sam Whitelock and Israel Dagg who gets to test his vocals alongside Kiwi musician Stan Walker .

American actor Rip Torn reprises his role as Chief of the Men in Black with Wallabies great David Campese , former England Captain Martin Johnson and former Argentinean Captain Agustin Pichot making cameo appearances.

The video was created in collaboration with Sony Pictures Entertainment’s Content Licensing group, with additional support from Sony Pictures Imageworks and Sony Pictures Entertainment’s Archives & Collections.

“The creative concept and the parallels drawn between the All Blacks and the Men in Black are really clever. It’s been exciting to help Air New Zealand bring the Men in Black universe to life in this unique way,” says Emmanuelle Borde , Executive Vice President, Sony Pictures Entertainment.

Air New Zealand Head of Global Brand Development Jodi Williams says the airline is Crazy About Rugby making the All Blacks the perfect partner for its latest safety offering.

“We recently extended our sponsorship of the All Blacks and New Zealand Rugby through until 2020 and thought what better way to celebrate than with a safety video.”

“We’ve worked with the All Blacks on previous safety videos and thought it would be fun this time around to have them step into the shoes of the other highly trained Men in Black. The result is not only entertaining but makes people sit up and take notice of the key safety messages.”

All Blacks Captain Richie McCaw says the players had a great time making the video.

“We had a lot of laughs on set and were blown away by Israel’s hidden singing talent. If rugby doesn’t work out for him he clearly has a promising career as a back-up singer.”

Israel Dagg says growing up he was a huge fan of the Men in Black films.

“I grew up listening to the iconic Men in Black movie soundtrack song. Hopefully I’ve done it some justice.”

Australian Wallabies great David Campese admitted his appearance in Men in Black Safety Defenders is likely to come at a cost.

“I’m expecting to get a right ribbing from my mates for appearing in a video promoting the All Blacks, Australia’s key opponents. They’ll never let me live it down.”

Former Argentina Captain Agustin Pichot and Martin Johnson , former England Captain shared his sentiment.

“The All Blacks are staunch rivals of the Pumas making it especially fun to play the role of their nemesis in Air New Zealand’s new safety video,” says Mr. Pichot.

“I’m a big fan of Air New Zealand so was excited to get the call up to appear in the airline’s latest inflight video. I’m sure English rugby fans will have a few words to say about my appearance alongside the All Blacks too,” says Mr. Johnson.

New Zealand Rugby Chief Executive Officer Steve Tew says it’s a big year for the All Blacks and with plenty of travel on the cards the team was keen to be involved in delivering the airline’s safety briefing to fellow customers.

“Air New Zealand’s been a long-time supporter of the All Blacks and New Zealand Rugby and has played a crucial role in connecting the team to fans across the globe through inventive and colorful marketing efforts such as Men in Black Safety Defenders.”

In addition the airline also issued this video:

Air New Zealand orders one more ATR 72-600

Air New Zealand (Auckland) today received its most recent ATR 72-600.

On the occasion of the delivery ceremony, held today at the Paris Air Show, the airline announced as well the purchase of an additional ATR 72-600 aircraft. Since 2011, Air New Zealand has purchased a total of 14 ATR 72-600s. Deliveries of the ATR 72-600 aircraft will continue until 2017. Once delivered, Air New Zealand will have 25 ATR aircraft in its fleet, including 11 ATR 72-500s and 14 ATR 72-600s.

The introduction of this additional ATR 72-600 aircraft marks yet another step in Air New Zealand’s fleet modernization strategy. The new ATR aircraft will join airline’s existing fleet of 6 other ATR 72-600s and 11 ATR 72-500s. The new aircraft will enter service in July across Air New Zealand’s regional domestic network.

As with other recent deliveries to Air New Zealand, the 68-seat ATR 72-600 is equipped with the most advanced technology for the aircraft type, including a new glass cockpit avionics suite and updated cabin interiors.

The new ATR 72-600 will be operated by Mount Cook Airline for Air New Zealand.

Copyright Photo: Oliver Gregoire/AirlinersGallery.com. ATR 72-212A (ATR 72-600) F-WWEC (msn 1228) became ZK-MVF on delivery.

Air New Zealand aircraft slide show: AG Airline Slide Show

Air New Zealand-Mount Cook aircraft slide show: AG Airline Slide Show

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Air New Zealand’s new surfing safety video

New safety video from Air New Zealand: In Air New Zealand’s latest safety video we fly to some of the world’s most stunning surf breaks. We partnered with some of the world’s top pro surfers, including Gabriel Medina, Mick Fanning, Laird Hamilton and Alana Blanchard, to demonstrate safety onboard our flights.