Category Archives: Alitalia (4th)

Italia Trasporto Aereo (ITA) is born to replace Alitalia

Newly-born Italia Trasporto Aereo (ITA) will replace the loss-making Alitalia. The Treasury of Italy has reached a deal with the European Commission for ITA to replace the current debt-ridden Alitalia on October 15, 2021 with 52 aircraft.

The ITA SpA Board of Directors today under the chairmanship of Alfredo Altavilla, met and approved the guidelines of the 2021-2025 Business Plan.

ITA will be able to acquire the assets necessary to manage the flight division through direct negotiation with Alitalia currently in Extraordinary Administration.

ITA will start with a slot allocation consistent with the initial size of its fleet, maintaining 85% of the slots currently held by Alitalia at Milan Linate Airport and 43% of the slots at Rome Fiumicino International Airport, the latter being less congested than Linate and with a greater availability of slots that can be acquired to support the growth in flights expected over the period of the plan.

The following are the main aspects of the Business Plan approved today:
Fleet
ITA will initially operate with a fleet of 52 aircraft, 7 of which are wide body and 45 narrow body.
In 2022 the fleet will grow to 78 aircraft (+26 on 2021) of which 13 are wide body (+6 on 2021) and 65 narrow body (+20 on 2021).
From 2022, new generation aircraft will begin to be added to the fleet, which will progressively replace older technology aircraft.
At the end of 2025 the fleet will grow to 105 aircraft (23 wide body and 82 narrow body), with 81 new generation aircraft (equal to 77% of the total fleet) which will significantly reduce the environmental impact and optimize the efficiency and quality of the offer.
Employees
ITA will start its operations in 2021 with a range 2,750-2,950 employees which will rise at the end of the plan (2025) to 5,550-5,700 people. All people will be hired with a new employment contract that ensures greater competitiveness and flexibility in comparison with other operators in the sector.
Network
ITA will concentrate on profitable routes from Rome Fiumicino and Milan Linate.
At the start of operations, the company will serve 45 destinations with 61 routes that will rise to 74 destinations and 89 routes in 2025.
In the IATA Winter 2021 season, ITA will operate routes to New York (from Rome and Milan), Tokyo Haneda, Boston and Miami (all three from Rome).
With the IATA Summer 2022 season the company plans to launch new flights to Sao Paulo, Buenos Aires, Washington and Los Angeles.
On the short and medium-haul network, ITA plans to operate connections from Rome Fiumicino and Milan Linate to its main European destinations (including Paris, London, Amsterdam, Brussels, Frankfurt, Geneva, with the expectation of further increasing the number of destinations and frequencies already with the IATA Summer 2022 season).
There are numerous other international routes served from Rome (including, for example, those to Madrid, Athens, Tel Aviv, Cairo, Tunis and Algiers).
Domestically ITA will serve 21 domestic airports.
Previously on July 2, 2021 the European Commission issued this statement:

The European Commission has found that an Italian aid measure of €39.7 million to support Alitalia is in line with EU State aid rules. This measure aims at compensating the airline for the damages suffered on certain routes due to the coronavirus outbreak during the period between 1 March and 30 April 2021.

Alitalia is a major network airline operating in Italy. With a fleet of over 95 planes. In 2019, the company served hundreds of destinations all over the world, carrying about 20 million passengers from its main hub in Rome and other Italian airports to various international destinations.

The restrictions put in place in Italy and other countries to limit the spread of a second and third wave of the coronavirus pandemic have heavily affected Alitalia’s operations. As a result, Alitalia incurred significant operating losses until at least 30 April 2021.

On 25 June 2021, Italy notified to the Commission an additional aid measure to compensate Alitalia for further damages suffered on certain specific routes from 1 March to 30 April 2021 due to the emergency measures necessary to limit the spread of the virus. The support will take the form of a €39.7 million direct grant, which corresponds to the estimated damage directly caused to the airline in that period according to a route-by-route analysis of the eligible routes. This follows the Commission decisions of 12 May 202126 March 202129 December 2020 and 4 September 2020 approving Italian damage compensation measures in favour of Alitalia, compensating the airline for the damages suffered from 1 to 31 January 2021, 1 November to 31 December 2020, 16 June to 31 October 2020 and 1 March to 15 June 2020 respectively.

The Commission assessed the measure under Article 107(2)(b) of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU), which enables the Commission to approve State aid measures granted by Member States to compensate specific companies or sectors for damage directly caused by exceptional occurrences. The Commission considers that the coronavirus outbreak qualifies as such an exceptional occurrence, as it is an extraordinary, unforeseeable event having significant economic impact. As a result, exceptional interventions by the Member State to compensate for the damages linked to the outbreak are justified.

The Commission found that the Italian measure will compensate for damages suffered by Alitalia which are directly linked to the coronavirus outbreak that qualifies as exceptional occurrence. The damage is calculated as the loss of profitability on certain routes due to the travel restrictions and other containment measures during the relevant period. It also found that the measure is proportionate, as the route-by-route quantitative analysis submitted by Italy appropriately identifies the damage attributable to the containment measures, and therefore the compensation does not exceed what is necessary to make good the damage on those routes.

On this basis, the Commission concluded that the additional Italian damage compensation measure is in line with EU State aid rules.

Background

Based on complaints received, on 23 April 2018 the Commission opened a formal investigation procedure on €900 million loans granted to Alitalia by Italy in 2017.  On 28 February 2020, the Commission opened a separate formal investigation procedure on an additional €400 million loan granted by Italy in October 2019. Both investigations are ongoing.

Financial support from EU or national funds granted to health services or other public services to tackle the coronavirus situation falls outside the scope of State aid control. The same applies to any public financial support given directly to citizens. Similarly, public support measures that are available to all companies such as for example wage subsidies and suspension of payments of corporate and value added taxes or social contributions do not fall under State aid control and do not require the Commission’s approval under EU State aid rules. In all these cases, Member States can act immediately.

When State aid rules are applicable, Member States can design ample aid measures to support specific companies or sectors suffering from the consequences of the coronavirus outbreak in line with the existing EU State aid framework. On 13 March 2020, the Commission adopted a Communication on a Coordinated economic response to the COVID-19 outbreak setting out these possibilities.

In this respect, for example:

  • Member States can compensate specific companies or specific sectors (in the form of schemes) for the damage suffered due and directly caused by exceptional occurrences, such as those caused by the coronavirus outbreak. This is foreseen by Article 107(2)(b)TFEU.
  • State aid rules based on Article 107(3)(c) TFEU enable Member States to help companies cope with liquidity shortages and needing urgent rescue aid.
  • This can be complemented by a variety of additional measures, such as under the de minimis Regulation and the General Block Exemption Regulation, which can also be put in place by Member States immediately, without involvement of the Commission.

In case of particularly severe economic situations, such as the one currently faced by all Member States due the coronavirus outbreak, EU State aid rules allow Member States to grant support to remedy a serious disturbance to their economy. This is foreseen by Article 107(3)(b) TFEU of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union.

Marco Finelli reporting from Italy.

Alitalia flies home the Italian football team from London as the winner of Euro 2020

This morning, Alitalia Airbus A319-112 EI-IMC flew home the Italian football team for the UEFA Euro 2020 championship (played in 2021). Italy defeated England for the championship.

Alitalia flight AZ9001 took off from Luton Airport at 3:02 am and landed at Rome’s Fiumicino Airport at 6:03 am.

Photo: Alitalia. The cup is pictured in the middle seat 1E. Coach Roberto Mancini is in seat 1D, and team manager Gabriele Oriali in seat 1F.

Marco Finelli reporting from Italy.

European Commission approves €39.7 million of Italian aid measure to compensate Alitalia for further damages suffered due to coronavirus outbreak

Alitalia (3rd) (Societa Aerea Italiana) Boeing 777-3Q8 ER EI-WLA (msn 35783) JFK (Robbie Shaw). Image: 948356.

The European Commission has approved the Italian government aid package for Alitalia:

The European Commission has found that an Italian aid measure of €39.7 million to support Alitalia is in line with EU State aid rules. This measure aims at compensating the airline for the damages suffered on certain routes due to the coronavirus outbreak during the period between 1 March and 30 April 2021.

Alitalia is a major network airline operating in Italy. With a fleet of over 95 planes. In 2019, the company served hundreds of destinations all over the world, carrying about 20 million passengers from its main hub in Rome and other Italian airports to various international destinations.

The restrictions put in place in Italy and other countries to limit the spread of a second and third wave of the coronavirus pandemic have heavily affected Alitalia’s operations. As a result, Alitalia incurred significant operating losses until at least 30 April 2021.

On 25 June 2021, Italy notified to the Commission an additional aid measure to compensate Alitalia for further damages suffered on certain specific routes from 1 March to 30 April 2021 due to the emergency measures necessary to limit the spread of the virus. The support will take the form of a €39.7 million direct grant, which corresponds to the estimated damage directly caused to the airline in that period according to a route-by-route analysis of the eligible routes. This follows the Commission decisions of 12 May 202126 March 202129 December 2020 and 4 September 2020 approving Italian damage compensation measures in favour of Alitalia, compensating the airline for the damages suffered from 1 to 31 January 2021, 1 November to 31 December 2020, 16 June to 31 October 2020 and 1 March to 15 June 2020 respectively.

The Commission assessed the measure under Article 107(2)(b) of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU), which enables the Commission to approve State aid measures granted by Member States to compensate specific companies or sectors for damage directly caused by exceptional occurrences. The Commission considers that the coronavirus outbreak qualifies as such an exceptional occurrence, as it is an extraordinary, unforeseeable event having significant economic impact. As a result, exceptional interventions by the Member State to compensate for the damages linked to the outbreak are justified.

The Commission found that the Italian measure will compensate for damages suffered by Alitalia which are directly linked to the coronavirus outbreak that qualifies as exceptional occurrence. The damage is calculated as the loss of profitability on certain routes due to the travel restrictions and other containment measures during the relevant period. It also found that the measure is proportionate, as the route-by-route quantitative analysis submitted by Italy appropriately identifies the damage attributable to the containment measures, and therefore the compensation does not exceed what is necessary to make good the damage on those routes.

On this basis, the Commission concluded that the additional Italian damage compensation measure is in line with EU State aid rules.

Background

Based on complaints received, on 23 April 2018 the Commission opened a formal investigation procedure on €900 million loans granted to Alitalia by Italy in 2017.  On 28 February 2020, the Commission opened a separate formal investigation procedure on an additional €400 million loan granted by Italy in October 2019. Both investigations are ongoing.

Financial support from EU or national funds granted to health services or other public services to tackle the coronavirus situation falls outside the scope of State aid control. The same applies to any public financial support given directly to citizens. Similarly, public support measures that are available to all companies such as for example wage subsidies and suspension of payments of corporate and value added taxes or social contributions do not fall under State aid control and do not require the Commission’s approval under EU State aid rules. In all these cases, Member States can act immediately.

When State aid rules are applicable, Member States can design ample aid measures to support specific companies or sectors suffering from the consequences of the coronavirus outbreak in line with the existing EU State aid framework. On 13 March 2020, the Commission adopted a Communication on a Coordinated economic response to the COVID-19 outbreak setting out these possibilities.

In this respect, for example:

  • Member States can compensate specific companies or specific sectors (in the form of schemes) for the damage suffered due and directly caused by exceptional occurrences, such as those caused by the coronavirus outbreak. This is foreseen by Article 107(2)(b)TFEU.
  • State aid rules based on Article 107(3)(c) TFEU enable Member States to help companies cope with liquidity shortages and needing urgent rescue aid.
  • This can be complemented by a variety of additional measures, such as under the de minimis Regulation and the General Block Exemption Regulation, which can also be put in place by Member States immediately, without involvement of the Commission.

In case of particularly severe economic situations, such as the one currently faced by all Member States due the coronavirus outbreak, EU State aid rules allow Member States to grant support to remedy a serious disturbance to their economy. This is foreseen by Article 107(3)(b) TFEU of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union.

On 19 March 2020, the Commission adopted a State aid Temporary Framework based on Article 107(3)(b) TFEU to enable Member States to use the full flexibility foreseen under State aid rules to support the economy in the context of the coronavirus outbreak. The Temporary Framework, as amended on 3 April8 May29 June13 October 2020 and 28 January 2021, provides for the following types of aid, which can be granted by Member States: (i) Direct grants, equity injections, selective tax advantages and advance payments; (ii) State guarantees for loans taken by companies; (iii) Subsidised public loans to companies, including subordinated loans; (iv) Safeguards for banks that channel State aid to the real economy; (v) Public short-term export credit insurance;(vi) Support for coronavirus related research and development (R&D); (vii) Support for the construction and upscaling of testing facilities; (viii) Support for the production of products relevant to tackle the coronavirus outbreak; (ix) Targeted support in the form of deferral of tax payments and/or suspensions of social security contributions; (x) Targeted support in the form of wage subsidies for employees; (xi) Targeted support in the form of equity and/or hybrid capital instruments; (xii) Support for uncovered fixed costs for companies facing a decline in turnover in the context of the coronavirus outbreak.

The Temporary Framework will be in place until the end of December 2021. With a view to ensuring legal certainty, the Commission will assess before this date if it needs to be extended.

Top Copyright Photo: Alitalia (3rd) (Societa Aerea Italiana) Boeing 777-3Q8 ER EI-WLA (msn 35783) JFK (Robbie Shaw). Image: 948356.

Alitalia aircraft slide show:

Alitalia to focus on holiday destinations this summer

Alitalia will focus on short haul flights to Greece, Spain, Croatia and more flights to European cities this summer.

In the summer of 2021, Alitalia will resume flying to the Italians’ favorite tourist destinations with new international flights to Greece, Spain and Croatia and more frequencies to Sicily, Puglia and Calabria. From today it is possible to book Alitalia flights from Rome Fiumicino to Santorini, Skiathos, Preveza, Kefalonia, Crete, Corfu, Mykonos, Zakynthos, Dubrovnik and Split and those from Rome Fiumicino and Milan Linate to Rhodes, Ibiza, Menorca and Palma de Mallorca.
Staring in June Alitalia will return to operate the connections with Malaga and Marseille and from July with Tel Aviv and Algiers.
From July, frequencies to the main European cities will also be increased: London, Madrid, Barcelona, ​​Athens, Paris, Nice, Brussels, Amsterdam, Geneva, Zurich, Frankfurt, Munich, Malta, Tirana. More connections also for Tunis and Cairo.
More flights will be available on national connections from Rome Fiumicino to Cagliari, Olbia, Alghero, Catania, Comiso, Lampedusa, Palermo, Pantelleria, Bari, Lamezia Terme, while from Milan Linate direct connections to Rome, Cagliari, Olbia, Alghero, Palermo will grow. Catania, Comiso, Lampedusa, Bari, Brindisi and Lamezia Terme, and from Milan Malpensa to Cagliari. Sardinia will also be reached from Pisa and Bologna with flights to Olbia, and from Verona with flights to Cagliari.
Marco Finelli reporting from Italy.

Alitalia and Rome announce new COVID-19 tested flights from Rome Fiumicino to Tokyo Haneda

Alitalia and Aeroporti di Roma are still at the forefront of protocols for traveling in extreme safety during the pandemic. After the success of Covid tested flights to and from New York, the same travel method will also be introduced for flights to Tokyo, thanks to the resumption of Alitalia’s direct flights from Rome Fiumicino to the capital of Japan, operated by three times a week.
The nonstop Alitalia service between Rome and Tokyo will start at same time with the expected Olympic Games. All passengers traveling on the three weekly flights to and from Tokyo, including the Italian athletes, must present a certificate proving negativity to Covid 19 at boarding. Upon arrival at the airport in Rome, a further antigen test will be performed. The negativity found in this second test will exempt passengers arriving in Rome from Japan from having to observe the fiduciary quarantine period in Italy. A method that has reassured the market, in parallel with the progress of the vaccination campaign in our country. The resumption of Alitalia flights to Japan will also be characterized by the inauguration of services at the most convenient city airport of Tokyo Haneda, only 20 kilometers from the city.
Marco Finelli reporting from Italy,

Reuters: Italy, Brussels to hammer out Alitalia revamp details

From Reuters:

“Rome and Brussels will start talks next week (week of March 8) to iron out technical details for the revamp of ailing carrier Alitalia, three Italian ministers said after what they referred to as a “positive and constructive” first meeting between the two sides on Friday.”

The new version of Alitalia (ITA) will start with around 45 aircraft and have around 4,500 employees and receive over 1 billion euros ($1.2 billion) in state support (Italy) under the current plan.

Read the full article.

 

ITA – Italia Trasporto Aereo (the new Alitalia) unveils its business plan approved by the Board of Directors

The Board of Directors of ITA – Italia Trasporti Aereo SpA (the new Alitalia) has approved the 2021-2025 Business Plan. The plan is still subject to Italian and European Commission approvals.

The plan outline is based on three main objectives:

  1. Create an efficient, innovative and competitive air carrier, able to offer the country quality connectivity in synergy with the strategic sectors of premium leisure and international business, placing the best service to customers – businesses, people and families – combined with social, environmental and economic sustainability, through careful and prudent management of resources.
  2. Develop a network of alliances aimed at expanding ITA’s range of action, increasing its growth and employment prospects, optimizing its investments in fleet and systems.
  3. Anchoring the network start-up, fleet and operating structures to the reality of the current context and their development, gradually and prudently, to the resumption of post Covid traffic, to ensure the public shareholder an efficient use of capital such as to allow an economic return on the amount invested, in line with the market. This, albeit in a still uncertain context, in which it remains difficult to accurately predict the evolution of demand and the consequent return on investments.

Operational Facts:

  1. Focus on the Rome Fiumicino Airport as main hub and Milan Linate Airport.
  2. Corporate structure with a holding company that will manage the flight operations, on which two subsidiaries will depend – and therefore with their own independent financial statements, which make it possible to constantly check their performance and compliance with the economic-financial balance – with specific skills in maintenance and handling, initially 100% controlled by ITA.
  3. Investments in digital systems and platforms to guarantee the customer experience of quality travel, as a distinctive element of the offer, and to develop a flexible and lean organization.

Marketing Facts:

  1. ITA aims to become the first choice on international destinations to and from Rome Fiumicino and to be the key company for business and leisure traffic to and from Milan Linate.
  2. The air cargo transport will be developed through the usage of jetliners belly cargo and the maybe in future a possible set up of a cargo division at Milan Malpensa airport is under overlook.

The business plan in the first year of operation envisions:

  1. 61 routes
  2. 52 aircraft
  3. Between 5,200 and 5,500 employees

International services from Rome:

2021: London, Amsterdam, Brussels, Paris CDG, Munich, Zurich, Geneva, Barcelona, ​​Madrid. Algiers, Tunis, Athens, Tirana, Cairo, Tel Aviv

2022: Valencia, Malaga, Frankfurt, Marseille, Belgrade, Malta, Sofia

2023: Moscow, Beirut, Amman

2024: Kuwait City, Jeddah, Riyadh

Domestic flights from Rome:

Turin, Bologna, Trieste, Verona, Venice, Florence, Bari, Brindisi, Naples, Lamezia, Reggio C., Catania, Comiso, Palermo, Alghero, Cagliari, Olbia.

International services from Milan Linate:

2021: London, Amsterdam, Brussels, Paris CDG and ORY, Frankfurt. Nationals on Rome, Naples, Alghero, Olbia, Cagliari, Palermo, Catania, Comiso, Reggio Calabria, Lamezia, Naples, Bari, Brindisi

2022: London (other stopover), Geneva, Madrid, Barcelona, ​​Luxembourg, Düsseldorf, Cologne, Stuttgart. National: Pescara

2023: Manchester, Hamburg.

By 2025 ITA will fly 93 routes.

The future aircraft fleet to be determined.

Talks are in progress with the old Alitalia SAI for the purchase of some of the commercial assets such as the Alitalia AZ code, 055 IATA ticket issuing plate, Alitalia brand, London Heathrow slots and Programma Millemiglia, the frequent flyer program.

Marco Finelli reporting from Italy.

Alitalia aircraft photo gallery:

Alitalia aircraft slide show:

Alitalia to have COVID-free flights to New York by December 8

Alitalia and Rome airports managing company ADR –  Aeroporti di Roma have announced that, as of coming Tuesday, December 8, 2020, all passengers traveling on one of the three weekly flights from and to New York must present a certification proving the negativity to COVID-19, carried out within 48 hours prior to the flight, or perform the antigen test directly at the airport before embarking. For those departing from the United States, upon arrival at Fiumicino they will be asked to perform a new antigen test; a double check that will exempt passengers from the quarantine obligation upon entry into Italy.

Also for these COVID-tested flights, passengers it will always be required to wear a protective surgical mask and to have a number of spare parts adequate for the duration of the trip, to replace them every 4 hours. In addition, before boarding, the completion of a self-certification certifying not to have had close contact with people affected by COVID-19 is required.

The initiative responds to the needs of passengers who, in a recent market survey, expressed a growing interest in adopting these measures with increasing flight hours. Furthermore, this experimental phase will aim to evaluate the effectiveness and functionality of the new travel mode, with the aim of making it more widely available in view of the upcoming Summer 2021 season.

The new travel protocol is governed by the ordinance of November 23, 2020 of the Italian Minister of Health, issued in agreement with the Italian Minister of Infrastructure and Transport and the Minister of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation. The government measure will be in force, unless extended, until February 15, 2021. The restrictions on entry into the United States provided for by the provisions of the American administration remain valid.

With this initiative Alitalia and Aeroporti di Roma extend the COVID-tested flight option, successfully launched last September 16, on two daily domestic flights Rome-Milan and confirm the commitment undertaken, from the earliest stages of the pandemic, to implement measures to prevent and protect the health of passengers and operators.

All Alitalia aircraft are sanitized daily with highly sanitizing products and, thanks to HEPA filters and vertical circulation, the air on board is renewed every three minutes and 99.7 pure, as in a sterile room, confirming that air travel remains the safest way to travel. In addition, the Leonardo da Vinci International Airport is at the forefront for high security standards achieved and is considered one of the safest airports in the world, so much so that it has obtained from Skytrax the maximum rating of 5 starts on anti-COVID health protocols, the ACI Airport Health Accreditation, and has just been chosen for the third consecutive year by ACI Europe as the best airport in Europe precisely because of the virus containment measures.

Marco Finelli reporting from Italy.

Alitalia aircraft slide show:

Alitalia to resume flights to Brazil and Argentina from mid-December

On December 15, 2020 Alitalia will resume non-stop services from Rome to Sao Paulo and inaugurate the codeshare agreement with Brazilian airline Gol; flights from Rome to Buenos Aires will begin on December 19, 2020.

Scheduled services ro Brazil and Argentina will be operated on a weekly basis and will mark not only the resumption, after about nine months, of a regular direct air connection between Italy and the two South American countries, but they will also guarantee greater opportunities for carrying goods between Europe and South America, thanks to the load capacity of 20 tons (in 80 cubic meters of space) of the bellies of the Alitalia Boeing 777-200ER aircraft which will fly on the two routes.

In detail, services to and from Brazil will restart from December 15 with departure from Rome Fiumicino airport at 10:05 pm and arrival at the Sao Paulo-Guarulhos airport at 6:25 am (local time) the following day. From Sao Paulo, the Alitalia Boeing will take off for the first time on  December 17 at 4:05 pm (local time) and land in Rome Fiumicino at 7:15 am the next morning. Departures from Rome will be every Tuesday and from Sao Paulo every Thursday.

With the resumption of operations in Brazil, a codeshare agreement with the Brazilian airline Gol will also be launched. The commercial agreement will offer will offer passengers the possibility to travel to 39 other Brazilian destinations (including, for example, Rio de Janeiro, Brasilia, Recife, Salvador) thanks to the flights operated by Gol to and from Sao Paulo airport in connection with the Alitalia flight to and from Rome.

Services to and from Argentina will restart from December 19 with departure from Rome Fiumicino airport at 9:50 pm and arrival at the Buenos Aires-Ezeiza airport at 8 am (local time) the following day. From Buenos Aires, the Alitalia Boeing will take off for the first time on  December 21 at 2:05 pm (local time) and land in Rome Fiumicino at 7 am the next morning. Departures from Rome will be every Saturday and from Buenos Aires every Monday.

With the resumption of these two routes to South America, Alitalia will serve three intercontinental destinations with scheduled flights: Buenos Aires, New York and Sao Paulo.

Marco Finelli reporting from Italy.

How the new Italia Trasporto Aereo SpA will replace the current Alitalia – Società Aerea Italiana

Newco, which replaced the current Alitalia, is now on the scene in Italy.

Italia Trasporto Aereo SpA (Alitalia 4th) was born on Friday, October 9, 2020 when four Italian ministers signed the constitution act: Roberto Gualtieri (economy), Stefano Patuanelli (economic development), Nunzia Catalfo (labor) and Paola De Micheli ( transport and infrastructure) cleared the new airline company with Chairman Francesco Caio (currently chairman at Saipem in the oil & gas world business) and Fabio Maria Lazzerini as CEO, at this time chief business officer in Alitalia SAI.

Italia Trasporto Aereo will start operations with 20 million € investment capital and will shortly get 3 billion € from Italy‘s Government.
The head office will be in Rome and take over the current Alitalia SAI in AS.
Paola De Micheli choose the motto for Italia Trasporto Aereo as “bring Italy to the world”.
Above: Left: Fabio Maria Lazzerini is the CEO and chief business officer of the current Alitalia.

Right: Francesco Caio is the new appointed chairman of Italia Trasporto Aereo SpA and is still the Saipem SpA oil and gas company chairman.
In the past weeks, Fabio Maria Lazzerini was designed CEO on June 29, 2020, told about a month ago in an audit to the low chamber transport commission;
The new airline was pushed to be set up from current Alitalia SAI in AS by commissar Giuseppe Leogrande. In a speech last Wednesday in the low chamber transport and infrastructure commission said “we urge to have the new airline soon in business for our workers families”.
“The current Alitalia is in business for carrying and continuing to fly people inside the country, In Europe and to New York with responsible management for operating as most cost effective is possible and reducing to minimum the losses. In the first 9 months have seen -1.7 billion € in gross profits and in August carried about 650,000 people on 7,619 (-57%) flights flown and only 319 million € of tickets and services sold. Low demand times of this year were in April with only 47,000 flyers carried on 1,490 flights and only 20 million € of business in ticket sold. In February 2020 Alitalia carried 1,363,000 people on 13,521 flights.”
Marco Finelli reporting from Italy.