Category Archives: British Airways

Comair temporarily takes its new MAX 8 aircraft out of schedule

First MAX 8 for Comair (South Africa), delivered February 26, 2019

Comair has just issued this statement:

 

Comair has decided to remove its 737 MAX 8 from its flight schedule, although neither regulatory authorities nor the manufacturer has required it to do so, Wrenelle Stander, executive director of Comair’s airline division, said on Monday afternoon.

While Comair has done extensive preparatory work prior to the introduction of the first 737 MAX 8 into its fleet and remains confident in the inherent safety of the aircraft, it has decided temporarily not to schedule the aircraft while it consults with other operators, Boeing and technical experts.

“The safety and confidence of our customers and crew is always our priority,” Stander said.

The MAX 8 is the latest iteration of the most common commercial aircraft ever manufactured. It is well-established around the world, particularly in the fleets of large carriers in the United States. There are currently over 370 Boeing 737 MAX 8s in operation, with 47 airlines. The type operates approximately 1 500 flights a day and has accumulated over 250 000 flights in total with an excellent record of daily reliability.

Top Copyright Photo: British Airways-Comair (South Africa) Boeing 737-8 MAX 8 ZS-ZCA (msn 60432) BFI (Joe G. Walker). Image: 945738.

British Airways-Comair aircraft slide show: CLICK HERE

x

Advertisements

British Airways unveils again the Landor livery on G-BNLY, departs for Miami

  • Boeing 747, reg G-BNLY, arrived at Heathrow this morning in the recognizable Landor livery
  • The aircraft will take to the skies on long-haul routes currently served by the Boeing 747
  • British Airways is painting selected aircraft in heritage designs to mark its centenary

Saturday March 9, 2019 – British Airways today welcomed the arrival of the third in its series of four heritage liveries – a Boeing 747 painted in the Landor design, which will be recognizable for many as it flew on British Airways aircraft between 1984-1997.

(Picture by Nick Morrish/British Airways)

The Boeing 747-436, registration G-BNLY, touched down at Heathrow this morning and will enter service this afternoon to Miami as flight BA211. It will be flying to long-haul destinations served by the Boeing 747-400, with the design remaining on the aircraft until it retires in 2023.

The aircraft marks the third heritage design to join the fleet, with one final design to be revealed later this month as the airline continues to celebrate its past while looking to the future in its centenary year. As with the British Overseas Airways Corporation (BOAC) liveried 747, and the British European Airways (BEA) liveried A319, the aircraft can be followed using tracking website Flightradar24.

In its centenary year British Airways is hosting a range of activities and events. As well as looking back, the airline is also hosting BA 2119 – a program, which will lead the debate on the future of flying and explore the future of sustainable aviation fuels, the aviation careers of the future and the customer experience of the future.

The airline will be working with expert partners to identify BA’s 100 Great Britons; the people up and down the country who are currently shaping modern Britain, and of course, the year would not be complete without some special flying and moments for customers.

The centenary activity is taking place alongside the airline’s current five-year £6.5bn investment for customers. This includes the installation of the best quality WiFi and power in every seat, fitting 128 long-haul aircraft with new interiors and taking delivery of 72 new aircraft. The airline will also be introducing new Club World seat with direct aisle access later this year.

Photos Above: British Airways.

"City of Swansea", arrival from Dublin paint shop in 1984 Landor livery on March 9, 2019

Above Copyright Photo: British Airways Boeing 747-436 G-BNLY (msn 27090) LHR (SPA). Image: 945933.

British Airways aircraft slide show:

Video:

British Airways invests in its first class product

British Airways issued this statement:

British Airways is set to deliver significant changes to the onboard product and service in its First cabin as part of its £6.5bn investment for customers.

The new look and feel, set to take to the skies from March 31, will include new bedding, amenities and menus that would not look out of place in a revered five-star British hotel.

The airline’s First customers will be offered super-soft, sophisticated new male and female loungewear designed exclusively by luxury British fashion brand, Temperley London. The loungewear will be coupled with bespoke British Airways amenity bags, featuring Temperley’s “Star” design. The bags will be filled with products from No 1 British Skincare brand, ELEMIS, including products from the highly sought after ULTRA SMART PRO-COLLAGEN range*. The amenity kit contains the essentials to cleanse, revive and hydrate.

The airline’s chefs have also designed new delicious A La Carte menus that focus on fresh seasonal ingredients of British provenance. The new menus will be served on elegant bone china crockery, designed exclusively for the airline by high-end British tableware designer William Edwards. The new tableware will be accompanied by contemporary cutlery from Studio William.

The airline will also be introducing a new signature afternoon tea service, showcasing the great British tradition of high tea. The menu will include a selection of sandwiches, delicate pastries and scones, as well as a wide range of tea infusions.

As part of the changes, British Airways is also investing in new Dartington glassware. Travellers will now be able to enjoy the airline’s fine wines and champagnes from sophisticated stemware, while soft drinks and spirits will be served from elegant cut-glass tumblers.

Carolina Martinoli, British Airways’ Director of Brand and Customer Experience, said: “As part of our £6.5bn investment for customers, we’re changing parts of the travel experience in our First cabin. Our teams of designers, chefs and customer service experts have carefully thought through the details we know matter most to our customers.

“In this, our centenary year, we’ve sought out some of the best British designers and manufacturers to work with to ensure travelling in First with British Airways is an unforgettable experience.”

The airline’s First customers will benefit from an improved turndown service for the perfect night’s sleep, thanks to new luxurious 400 thread count bedding, accompanied by a foam fibre mattress topper. Customers will also receive a stylish new day blanket and bolster cushion.

And those wishing to relax and enjoy the 1,000 hours of programmes available on the in-flight entertainment channels, can do so through high performance headphones crafted by Meridian, the British Pioneers of High Resolution audio.

British Airways’ First customers continue to have access to the airline’s exclusive First Wing at Heathrow Terminal 5. Re-designed and unveiled in 2017, the First Wing provides customers with a private check-in area leading through to dedicated security lanes, which grant customers direct access to British Airways’ prestigious First Lounge.

2019 is British Airways’ Centenary year. The airline is investing £6.5 billion for customers over five years, including new aircraft, new cabins, new catering, new lounges, WiFi, and new routes.

* ULTRA SMART PRO-COLLAGEN is a new bespoke range of skincare that adapts to individual needs to preserve and promote younger looking, luminous skin.

Female amenity bags contain:

Cleansing micellar facial wipe

Soothing apricot facial wipe

Pro-collagen rose mist

Ultra smart pro-collagen matrix moisturiser

Ultra smart pro-collagen eye cream

Hydra-nourish lip balm

Sea lavender and samphire hand cream

Fortitude deodorant

Male amenity bags contain:

Ultra smart pro-collagen eye cream

Ultra smart pro-collagen matrix moisturiser

Cleansing micellar facial wipe

Skin soothe shave gel

Fortitude deodorant

Hydra-nourish lip balm

British Airways unveils its second retro livery – BEA

British Airways announced on social media (below) the arrival of its second retro livery as part of BA100. Airbus A319-131 G-EUPJ (msn 1232) now wears the livery of predecessor BEA – British European Airways.

The skies may be grey, but G-EUPJ is gleaming in her retro BEA livery. Thanks IAC Ltd for doing such a great job!

The airline also issued this more formal statement:

  • A319, reg G-EUPJ, arrived at Heathrow this morning in British European Airways colors
  • The aircraft will fly domestic and European routes, heading first to Manchester
  • British Airways is painting selected aircraft in heritage designs to mark its centenary

Monday March 4, 2019 – British Airways today unveiled the second in its series of heritage liveries – a British European Airways (BEA) design on an Airbus A319 – as it touched down at Heathrow this morning.

The arrival drew large crowds to Shannon, where the aircraft was painted, and Heathrow, British Airways’ home.

The A319, registration G-EUPJ, is adorned with the BEA livery, which flew predominantly on domestic and European routes between 1959 and 1968. However, there is one significant difference with the replica; the aircraft will have a grey upper wing, rather than the traditional red, to meet current wing paint reflectivity requirements.

The aircraft, which has been painted to mark British Airways’ centenary, enters service this afternoon with its maiden commercial flight in its new colors to Manchester. After this, it will continue to fly routes across the UK and Europe, with the design remaining on the aircraft until it retires next year. As with the British Overseas Airways Corporation (BOAC) liveried 747, the aircraft can be followed using tracking website Flightradar24, which will feature a special image of the livery.

Picture by: Stuart Bailey

The BEA liveried A319 is the second aircraft with heritage designs to enter the British Airways fleet following the arrival of its BOAC 747 long-haul counterpart last month. Next to arrive with be another 747, this time with a British Airways Landor livery. And one final design will be revealed later this month as the airline celebrates its past while looking to the future.

In its centenary year British Airways is hosting a range of activities and events. As well as looking back, the airline is also hosting BA 2119 – a program, which will lead the debate on the future of flying and explore the future of sustainable aviation fuels, the aviation careers of the future and the customer experience of the future.

The airline will be working with expert partners to identify BA’s 100 Great Britons; the people up and down the country who are currently shaping modern Britain, and of course, the year would not be complete without some special flying and moments for customers.

The centenary activity is taking place alongside the airline’s current five-year £6.5bn investment for customers. This includes the installation of the best quality WiFi and power in every seat, fitting 128 long-haul aircraft with new interiors and taking delivery of 72 new aircraft. The airline will also be introducing new Club World seat with direct aisle access later this year.

G-EUPJ has now arrived at the London Heathrow base.

Photos: British Airways.

Below Copyright Photo: BEA – British Airways Airbus A319-131 G-EUPJ (msn 1232) LHR (Antony J. Best). Image: 945932.

"BA 100 1919 - 2019" - in BEA's 1959 red square livery

50 Years of the Concorde

The 50th Anniversary of the first BAC-Aerospatiale Concorde flight was on March 2, 2019. Concorde 001 made its first test flight from Toulouse on March 2, 1969.

From Wikipedia:

Scheduled flights began on January 21, 1976 on the London–Bahrain and Paris–Rio de Janeiro (via Dakar) routes, with BA flights using the Speedbird Concorde call sign to notify air traffic control of the aircraft’s unique abilities and restrictions, but the French using their normal call signs. The Paris-Caracas route (via Azores) began on April 10. The US Congress had just banned Concorde landings in the US, mainly due to citizen protest over sonic booms, preventing launch on the coveted North Atlantic routes. The US Secretary of Transportation, William Coleman, gave permission for Concorde service to Washington Dulles International Airport, and Air France and British Airways simultaneously began a thrice-weekly service to Dulles on May 24, 1976.

Of the twenty aircraft built, 18 are still intact and in museums around the world.

 

 

British Airways decides to paint G-BNLY in the Landor design

British Airways Boeing 747-436 G-CIVK (msn 25818) LHR (SPA). Image: 940522.

British Airways has decided to paint Boeing 747-436 G-BNLY in the 1984 Landor design rather than the 1973 Negus design as previously reported. G-BNLY will become the third design in the series as part of BA’s centenary celebrations. G-BNLY is currently being painted at Dublin.

The 747-400 type has flown in the Landor livery in the past such as G-CIVK (above).

Top Copyright Photo: British Airways Boeing 747-436 G-CIVK (msn 25818) LHR (SPA). Image: 940522.

British Airways aircraft slide show (Historic Liveries):

The airline issued this statement:

  • The iconic Landor design will be the next heritage livery to take to the skies on a Boeing 747
  • Aircraft landed in Dublin earlier this week to be painted and will return to Heathrow later in the month
  • Aircraft is the third in a series of heritage liveries flying as part of British Airways’ centenary celebrations – a British Overseas Airways Corporate (BOAC) liveried Boeing 747 is already operating around the airline’s long-haul network, and an Airbus 319 is currently being painted with the British European Airways (BEA) livery

British Airways has today revealed the third design in its series of heritage liveries to mark the airline’s centenary – a Boeing 747-400 painted in the iconic Landor design.

The announcement comes after huge crowds turned out to see the first heritage livery – a 747 in British Overseas Airways Corporation (BOAC) colors, which touched down at Heathrow last week and follows the news that an Airbus 319 is currently being re-painted in the British European Airways (BEA) livery.

The Boeing 747-400, registration G-BNLY, entered the IAC paint bay at Dublin Airport earlier this week where it will be repainted with the Landor livery, which adorned the British Airways fleet from 1984-1997. Design features include the British Airways coat of arms with the motto To Fly. To Serve. on the tail fin, with a stylised section of the Union Flag. It will also be re-named ‘City of Swansea’, the name the aircraft had when it originally sported the Landor livery. The livery also features the airlines’ centenary logo, which is proudly displayed on all the centenary heritage liveried aircraft.

It will return to Heathrow and enter service later in the month flying to long-haul destinations served by the Boeing 747, with the design remaining on the aircraft until it retires in 2023.

The Landor, BEA and BOAC heritage liveries are part of a special series to mark British Airways’ centenary, as the airline celebrates its past while looking to the future. One final replica design will be revealed in due course, while all new aircraft entering the fleet, including the A350, will continue to receive today’s Chatham Dockyard design.

In its centenary year British Airways is hosting a range of activities and events. As well as looking back, the airline is also hosting BA 2119 – a program, which will lead the debate on the future of flying and explore the future of sustainable aviation fuels, the aviation careers of the future and the customer experience of the future.

The airline will be working with expert partners to identify BA’s 100 Great Britons; the people up and down the country who are currently shaping modern Britain, and of course, the year would not be complete without some special flying and moments for customers.

The centenary activity is taking place alongside the airline’s current five-year £6.5bn investment for customers. This includes the installation of the best quality WiFi and power in every seat, fitting 128 long-haul aircraft with new interiors and taking delivery of 72 new aircraft. The airline will also be introducing a new Club World seat with direct aisle access later this year.

A potted history of BA:

  • On August 25, 1919, British Airways’ forerunner company, Aircraft Transport and Travel Limited (AT&T), launched the world’s first daily international scheduled air service between London and Paris.
  • In 1924, Britain’s four main fledgling airlines, which had by then evolved into Instone, Handley Page, Daimler Airways (a successor to AT&T), and British Air Marine Navigation Company Limited, merged to form Imperial Airways Limited.
  • By 1925, Imperial Airways was providing services to Paris, Brussels, Basle, Cologne and Zurich.  Meanwhile, a number of smaller UK air transport companies had started flights and in 1935, they merged to form the original privately-owned British Airways Limited, which became Imperial Airways’ principal UK competitor on European routes.
  • Following a Government review, Imperial Airways and British Airways were nationalised in 1939 to form British Overseas Airways Corporation (BOAC). Continental European and domestic flights were flown by a new airline, British European Airways (BEA) from 1946. BOAC introduced services to New York in 1946, Japan in 1948, Chicago in 1954 and the west coast of the United States in 1957. BEA developed a domestic network to various points in the United Kingdom, including Belfast, Edinburgh, Glasgow and Manchester.
  • From 1946 until 1960, BOAC and BEA were the principal British operators of scheduled international passenger and cargo services – and they preserved Britain’s pioneering role in the industry. The 1950s saw the world enter the passenger jet era – led by BOAC, with the Comet flying to Johannesburg in 1952, halving the previous flight time.
  • Additional airlines began to pass into BEA’s ownership and in 1967, the Government recommended a holding board be responsible for BOAC and BEA, with the establishment of a second force airline, resulting in British Caledonian being born in 1970.
  • Two years later, the businesses of BOAC and BEA were combined under the newly formed British Airways Board, with the separate airlines coming together as British Airways in 1974.
  • In July 1979, the Government announced its intention to sell shares in British Airways and in February 1987 British Airways was privatised.
  • In January 2011 the International Consolidated Airlines Group (IAG) was formed when British Airways and Iberia merged. IAG has since also become the parent company of Aer Lingus, and Vueling and in 2017, IAG launched LEVEL a new low-cost airline brand that operates from Barcelona, Paris and Vienna.

IAG orders 18 Boeing 777-9 airplanes + 24 options for British Airways

Boeing and International Airlines Group (IAG), the parent company of British Airways, announced the airline has committed to purchasing up to 42 777X airplanes, including 18 orders and 24 options. The airline joins a group of leading carriers that have selected the new 777-9, which will debut next month as the largest and most efficient twin-engine passenger jet in the world.

The commitment, valued at up to $18.6 billion at list prices, will be reflected on Boeing’s Orders and Deliveries website once it is finalized.

British Airways has been modernizing its fleet – one of the largest in the airline industry – to more efficiently serve its extensive global route network. In recent years, the airline has introduced the super-efficient 787 Dreamliner family to replace its medium-sized widebody jets. The new 777-9 will replace British Airways’ larger widebody airplanes, mainly the four-engine 747 jumbo jet.

In ordering the 777-9, British Airways extends a long-running relationship with the popular 777 family. The airline is one of the largest 777 operators with a fleet of nearly 60 of the long-range jet. The airline last year committed to four more 777-300ER (Extended Range) jets via operating lease.

The 777-9 is larger and has a slightly wider cabin than current 777s, which provides the ability to comfortably sit 400-425 passengers in a standard two-class cabin. Powered by 787 Dreamliner technologies, an all-new composite wing, and other enhancements, the 777-9 offers airlines 12 percent lower fuel consumption than competing airplanes. The 777-9 can also fly farther than its predecessors with a standard range of 7,600 nautical miles (14,075 kilometers).

The 777X will also debut a redesigned cabin that incorporates popular 787 features and new technologies. Recently unveiled online, the 777X interior offers larger windows, a wider cabin, new lighting, while providing passengers with a smoother ride, better cabin altitude, humidity, and sound quality.

The selection by IAG and British Airways puts the 777X at 358 orders and commitments from eight customers. Production of the 777X began in 2017, with first flight planned for this year and first delivery expected in 2020.

Image: British Airways.