British Airways decides to paint G-BNLY in the Landor design

British Airways Boeing 747-436 G-CIVK (msn 25818) LHR (SPA). Image: 940522.

British Airways has decided to paint Boeing 747-436 G-BNLY in the 1984 Landor design rather than the 1973 Negus design as previously reported. G-BNLY will become the third design in the series as part of BA’s centenary celebrations. G-BNLY is currently being painted at Dublin.

The 747-400 type has flown in the Landor livery in the past such as G-CIVK (above).

Top Copyright Photo: British Airways Boeing 747-436 G-CIVK (msn 25818) LHR (SPA). Image: 940522.

British Airways aircraft slide show (Historic Liveries):

The airline issued this statement:

  • The iconic Landor design will be the next heritage livery to take to the skies on a Boeing 747
  • Aircraft landed in Dublin earlier this week to be painted and will return to Heathrow later in the month
  • Aircraft is the third in a series of heritage liveries flying as part of British Airways’ centenary celebrations – a British Overseas Airways Corporate (BOAC) liveried Boeing 747 is already operating around the airline’s long-haul network, and an Airbus 319 is currently being painted with the British European Airways (BEA) livery

British Airways has today revealed the third design in its series of heritage liveries to mark the airline’s centenary – a Boeing 747-400 painted in the iconic Landor design.

The announcement comes after huge crowds turned out to see the first heritage livery – a 747 in British Overseas Airways Corporation (BOAC) colors, which touched down at Heathrow last week and follows the news that an Airbus 319 is currently being re-painted in the British European Airways (BEA) livery.

The Boeing 747-400, registration G-BNLY, entered the IAC paint bay at Dublin Airport earlier this week where it will be repainted with the Landor livery, which adorned the British Airways fleet from 1984-1997. Design features include the British Airways coat of arms with the motto To Fly. To Serve. on the tail fin, with a stylised section of the Union Flag. It will also be re-named ‘City of Swansea’, the name the aircraft had when it originally sported the Landor livery. The livery also features the airlines’ centenary logo, which is proudly displayed on all the centenary heritage liveried aircraft.

It will return to Heathrow and enter service later in the month flying to long-haul destinations served by the Boeing 747, with the design remaining on the aircraft until it retires in 2023.

The Landor, BEA and BOAC heritage liveries are part of a special series to mark British Airways’ centenary, as the airline celebrates its past while looking to the future. One final replica design will be revealed in due course, while all new aircraft entering the fleet, including the A350, will continue to receive today’s Chatham Dockyard design.

In its centenary year British Airways is hosting a range of activities and events. As well as looking back, the airline is also hosting BA 2119 – a program, which will lead the debate on the future of flying and explore the future of sustainable aviation fuels, the aviation careers of the future and the customer experience of the future.

The airline will be working with expert partners to identify BA’s 100 Great Britons; the people up and down the country who are currently shaping modern Britain, and of course, the year would not be complete without some special flying and moments for customers.

The centenary activity is taking place alongside the airline’s current five-year £6.5bn investment for customers. This includes the installation of the best quality WiFi and power in every seat, fitting 128 long-haul aircraft with new interiors and taking delivery of 72 new aircraft. The airline will also be introducing a new Club World seat with direct aisle access later this year.

A potted history of BA:

  • On August 25, 1919, British Airways’ forerunner company, Aircraft Transport and Travel Limited (AT&T), launched the world’s first daily international scheduled air service between London and Paris.
  • In 1924, Britain’s four main fledgling airlines, which had by then evolved into Instone, Handley Page, Daimler Airways (a successor to AT&T), and British Air Marine Navigation Company Limited, merged to form Imperial Airways Limited.
  • By 1925, Imperial Airways was providing services to Paris, Brussels, Basle, Cologne and Zurich.  Meanwhile, a number of smaller UK air transport companies had started flights and in 1935, they merged to form the original privately-owned British Airways Limited, which became Imperial Airways’ principal UK competitor on European routes.
  • Following a Government review, Imperial Airways and British Airways were nationalised in 1939 to form British Overseas Airways Corporation (BOAC). Continental European and domestic flights were flown by a new airline, British European Airways (BEA) from 1946. BOAC introduced services to New York in 1946, Japan in 1948, Chicago in 1954 and the west coast of the United States in 1957. BEA developed a domestic network to various points in the United Kingdom, including Belfast, Edinburgh, Glasgow and Manchester.
  • From 1946 until 1960, BOAC and BEA were the principal British operators of scheduled international passenger and cargo services – and they preserved Britain’s pioneering role in the industry. The 1950s saw the world enter the passenger jet era – led by BOAC, with the Comet flying to Johannesburg in 1952, halving the previous flight time.
  • Additional airlines began to pass into BEA’s ownership and in 1967, the Government recommended a holding board be responsible for BOAC and BEA, with the establishment of a second force airline, resulting in British Caledonian being born in 1970.
  • Two years later, the businesses of BOAC and BEA were combined under the newly formed British Airways Board, with the separate airlines coming together as British Airways in 1974.
  • In July 1979, the Government announced its intention to sell shares in British Airways and in February 1987 British Airways was privatised.
  • In January 2011 the International Consolidated Airlines Group (IAG) was formed when British Airways and Iberia merged. IAG has since also become the parent company of Aer Lingus, and Vueling and in 2017, IAG launched LEVEL a new low-cost airline brand that operates from Barcelona, Paris and Vienna.
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