Tag Archives: Boeing 747-436

British Airways selects the 1973 Negus livery as the fourth heritage livery on G-CIVB

British Airways released this statement:

After much speculation, British Airways has today revealed the fourth and final design in its series of heritage liveries to mark the airline’s centenary – a Boeing 747 painted in the Negus design.

The Boeing 747-400, registration G-CIVB, entered the IAC paint bay at Dublin Airport last Saturday where it is being repainted with the first version of the Negus livery which adorned the British Airways fleet from 1974-1980, directly after the merger of BOAC and BEA and the formation of the airline customers know today.

When it initially flew, the Negus livery was the first time an aircraft had carried “British Airways“ since 1939, when the original British Airways Limited merged with Imperial Airways to form BOAC. Interestingly, the Union Flag is not present on the side of the aircraft as, like the final BEA aircraft livery, the flag began to be fully celebrated on the aircraft’s tailfin instead.

The repainted 747 will return to Heathrow and enter service later this month flying to long-haul destinations served by the Boeing 747, with the design remaining on the aircraft until it retires in 2022.

The Negus is the fourth and final heritage design to be painted on a British Airways aircraft following a British Overseas Airways Corporate (BOAC) liveried Boeing 747, a British European Airways (BEA) Airbus 319 and a British Airways Landor 747, all of which are already flying.

The special series of designs are being introduced to mark British Airways’ centenary, as the airline celebrates its past while looking to the future. Alongside the heritage liveries, all new aircraft entering the fleet, including the A350, will continue to receive today’s Chatham Dockyard design.

Alex Cruz, British Airways’ Chairman and CEO, said: “Rumours have been circulating for quite some time about this final livery, so it’s exciting to confirm it is the Negus design. It’s particularly significant for us because it’s the first design worn by the British Airways that we all know today, with the distinctive lower case ‘a’ and the Union Flag on the tailfin.”

Below is a video of the 747 aircraft which will be painted in the Negus livery departing Heathrow for Dublin earlier this month:

In its centenary year British Airways is hosting a range of activities and events. As well as looking back, the airline is also hosting BA 2119 – a program, which will lead the debate on the future of flying and explore the future of sustainable aviation fuels, the aviation careers of the future and the customer experience of the future.

The airline will be working with expert partners to identify BA’s 100 Great Britons; the people up and down the country who are currently shaping modern Britain, and of course, the year would not be complete without some special flying and moments for customers.

The centenary activity is taking place alongside the airline’s current five-year £6.5bn investment for customers. This includes the installation of the best quality WiFi and power in every seat, fitting 128 long-haul aircraft with new interiors and taking delivery of 72 new aircraft. The airline will also be introducing a new Club World seat with direct aisle access later this year.

Editor’s Note: BOAC Boeing 707 G-AXXY was the first aircraft to wear the Negus and Negus livery in September 1973. BOAC and BEA merged officially on April 1, 1974.

British Airways aircraft slide show (historic liveries):

Below Copyright Photo: British Airways Boeing 747-136 G-AWNP (msn 20952) MIA (Bruce Drum). Image: 102983.

"Sir John Hawkins"

Advertisements

British Airways unveils again the Landor livery on G-BNLY, departs for Miami

  • Boeing 747, reg G-BNLY, arrived at Heathrow this morning in the recognizable Landor livery
  • The aircraft will take to the skies on long-haul routes currently served by the Boeing 747
  • British Airways is painting selected aircraft in heritage designs to mark its centenary

Saturday March 9, 2019 – British Airways today welcomed the arrival of the third in its series of four heritage liveries – a Boeing 747 painted in the Landor design, which will be recognizable for many as it flew on British Airways aircraft between 1984-1997.

(Picture by Nick Morrish/British Airways)

The Boeing 747-436, registration G-BNLY, touched down at Heathrow this morning and will enter service this afternoon to Miami as flight BA211. It will be flying to long-haul destinations served by the Boeing 747-400, with the design remaining on the aircraft until it retires in 2023.

The aircraft marks the third heritage design to join the fleet, with one final design to be revealed later this month as the airline continues to celebrate its past while looking to the future in its centenary year. As with the British Overseas Airways Corporation (BOAC) liveried 747, and the British European Airways (BEA) liveried A319, the aircraft can be followed using tracking website Flightradar24.

In its centenary year British Airways is hosting a range of activities and events. As well as looking back, the airline is also hosting BA 2119 – a program, which will lead the debate on the future of flying and explore the future of sustainable aviation fuels, the aviation careers of the future and the customer experience of the future.

The airline will be working with expert partners to identify BA’s 100 Great Britons; the people up and down the country who are currently shaping modern Britain, and of course, the year would not be complete without some special flying and moments for customers.

The centenary activity is taking place alongside the airline’s current five-year £6.5bn investment for customers. This includes the installation of the best quality WiFi and power in every seat, fitting 128 long-haul aircraft with new interiors and taking delivery of 72 new aircraft. The airline will also be introducing new Club World seat with direct aisle access later this year.

Photos Above: British Airways.

"City of Swansea", arrival from Dublin paint shop in 1984 Landor livery on March 9, 2019

Above Copyright Photo: British Airways Boeing 747-436 G-BNLY (msn 27090) LHR (SPA). Image: 945933.

British Airways aircraft slide show:

Video:

British Airways decides to paint G-BNLY in the Landor design

British Airways Boeing 747-436 G-CIVK (msn 25818) LHR (SPA). Image: 940522.

British Airways has decided to paint Boeing 747-436 G-BNLY in the 1984 Landor design rather than the 1973 Negus design as previously reported. G-BNLY will become the third design in the series as part of BA’s centenary celebrations. G-BNLY is currently being painted at Dublin.

The 747-400 type has flown in the Landor livery in the past such as G-CIVK (above).

Top Copyright Photo: British Airways Boeing 747-436 G-CIVK (msn 25818) LHR (SPA). Image: 940522.

British Airways aircraft slide show (Historic Liveries):

The airline issued this statement:

  • The iconic Landor design will be the next heritage livery to take to the skies on a Boeing 747
  • Aircraft landed in Dublin earlier this week to be painted and will return to Heathrow later in the month
  • Aircraft is the third in a series of heritage liveries flying as part of British Airways’ centenary celebrations – a British Overseas Airways Corporate (BOAC) liveried Boeing 747 is already operating around the airline’s long-haul network, and an Airbus 319 is currently being painted with the British European Airways (BEA) livery

British Airways has today revealed the third design in its series of heritage liveries to mark the airline’s centenary – a Boeing 747-400 painted in the iconic Landor design.

The announcement comes after huge crowds turned out to see the first heritage livery – a 747 in British Overseas Airways Corporation (BOAC) colors, which touched down at Heathrow last week and follows the news that an Airbus 319 is currently being re-painted in the British European Airways (BEA) livery.

The Boeing 747-400, registration G-BNLY, entered the IAC paint bay at Dublin Airport earlier this week where it will be repainted with the Landor livery, which adorned the British Airways fleet from 1984-1997. Design features include the British Airways coat of arms with the motto To Fly. To Serve. on the tail fin, with a stylised section of the Union Flag. It will also be re-named ‘City of Swansea’, the name the aircraft had when it originally sported the Landor livery. The livery also features the airlines’ centenary logo, which is proudly displayed on all the centenary heritage liveried aircraft.

It will return to Heathrow and enter service later in the month flying to long-haul destinations served by the Boeing 747, with the design remaining on the aircraft until it retires in 2023.

The Landor, BEA and BOAC heritage liveries are part of a special series to mark British Airways’ centenary, as the airline celebrates its past while looking to the future. One final replica design will be revealed in due course, while all new aircraft entering the fleet, including the A350, will continue to receive today’s Chatham Dockyard design.

In its centenary year British Airways is hosting a range of activities and events. As well as looking back, the airline is also hosting BA 2119 – a program, which will lead the debate on the future of flying and explore the future of sustainable aviation fuels, the aviation careers of the future and the customer experience of the future.

The airline will be working with expert partners to identify BA’s 100 Great Britons; the people up and down the country who are currently shaping modern Britain, and of course, the year would not be complete without some special flying and moments for customers.

The centenary activity is taking place alongside the airline’s current five-year £6.5bn investment for customers. This includes the installation of the best quality WiFi and power in every seat, fitting 128 long-haul aircraft with new interiors and taking delivery of 72 new aircraft. The airline will also be introducing a new Club World seat with direct aisle access later this year.

A potted history of BA:

  • On August 25, 1919, British Airways’ forerunner company, Aircraft Transport and Travel Limited (AT&T), launched the world’s first daily international scheduled air service between London and Paris.
  • In 1924, Britain’s four main fledgling airlines, which had by then evolved into Instone, Handley Page, Daimler Airways (a successor to AT&T), and British Air Marine Navigation Company Limited, merged to form Imperial Airways Limited.
  • By 1925, Imperial Airways was providing services to Paris, Brussels, Basle, Cologne and Zurich.  Meanwhile, a number of smaller UK air transport companies had started flights and in 1935, they merged to form the original privately-owned British Airways Limited, which became Imperial Airways’ principal UK competitor on European routes.
  • Following a Government review, Imperial Airways and British Airways were nationalised in 1939 to form British Overseas Airways Corporation (BOAC). Continental European and domestic flights were flown by a new airline, British European Airways (BEA) from 1946. BOAC introduced services to New York in 1946, Japan in 1948, Chicago in 1954 and the west coast of the United States in 1957. BEA developed a domestic network to various points in the United Kingdom, including Belfast, Edinburgh, Glasgow and Manchester.
  • From 1946 until 1960, BOAC and BEA were the principal British operators of scheduled international passenger and cargo services – and they preserved Britain’s pioneering role in the industry. The 1950s saw the world enter the passenger jet era – led by BOAC, with the Comet flying to Johannesburg in 1952, halving the previous flight time.
  • Additional airlines began to pass into BEA’s ownership and in 1967, the Government recommended a holding board be responsible for BOAC and BEA, with the establishment of a second force airline, resulting in British Caledonian being born in 1970.
  • Two years later, the businesses of BOAC and BEA were combined under the newly formed British Airways Board, with the separate airlines coming together as British Airways in 1974.
  • In July 1979, the Government announced its intention to sell shares in British Airways and in February 1987 British Airways was privatised.
  • In January 2011 the International Consolidated Airlines Group (IAG) was formed when British Airways and Iberia merged. IAG has since also become the parent company of Aer Lingus, and Vueling and in 2017, IAG launched LEVEL a new low-cost airline brand that operates from Barcelona, Paris and Vienna.

First Look: Rolled out today at Dublin – a BOAC Boeing 747-400

"British Airways 100 1919 - 2019", rolled out at Dublin on February 18, 2019

Copyright Photo: BOAC (British Airways) Boeing 747-436 G-BYGC (msn 25823) (British Airways 100 1919-2019) DUB (Greenwing). Image: 945722.

As previously reported, as part of its 100-year birthday, British Airways previously announced it will be painting a Boeing 747-400 in the much-admired design of its predecessor British Overseas Airways Corporation (BOAC).

The livery from the 1964 – 1974 BOAC era now adorns this Boeing 747-400, registration G-BYGC.

The aircraft will leave the paint shop in Dublin and arrive in to Heathrow on February 18, before entering service the following day. This coincides with the 50th anniversary of the first Boeing 747 flight only a few days earlier.

The BOAC 747 will be the first aircraft to receive a popular design from British Airways’ past with more details of further designs to be revealed in due course. Aircraft which receive the retro liveries will fly British Airways’ routes, proudly showcasing some of the popular designs as part of the airline’s centenary celebrations.

All new aircraft entering the fleet, including the Airbus A350, will continue to receive today’s popular Chatham Dockyard design.

Alex Cruz, British Airways’ Chairman and CEO, said: “So many British Airways customers and colleagues have fond memories of our previous liveries, regularly sharing their photos from across the globe, so it’s incredibly exciting to be re-introducing this classic BOAC design.

“Our history has shaped who we are today, so our centenary is the perfect moment to revisit our heritage and the UK’s aviation landscape through this iconic livery.”

The 747 has been deliberately chosen for the BOAC livery as it is a later variant of the same aircraft type that adorned the design when it was initially in operation.

The BOAC livery will remain on the Boeing 747-400 until it retires in 2023. By this time, British Airways will have retired the majority of its 747 fleet, replacing them with new state-of-the-art long-haul aircraft. This includes taking delivery of 18 A350s and 12 Boeing 787 Dreamliners in the next four years – which feature new cabins and are more environmentally efficient – as well as another 26 short-haul aircraft, all part of the airline’s £6.5bn investment for customers.

A potted history of BA:

  • On August 25, 1919, British Airways’ forerunner company, Aircraft Transport and Travel Limited (AT&T), launched the world’s first daily international scheduled air service between London and Paris.
  • In 1924, Britain’s four main fledgling airlines, which had by then evolved into Instone, Handley Page, Daimler Airways (a successor to AT&T), and British Air Marine Navigation Company Limited, merged to form Imperial Airways Limited.
  • By 1925, Imperial Airways was providing services to Paris, Brussels, Basle, Cologne and Zurich.  Meanwhile, a number of smaller UK air transport companies had started flights and in 1935, they merged to form the original privately-owned British Airways Limited, which became Imperial Airways’ principal UK competitor on European routes.
  • Following a Government review, Imperial Airways and British Airways were nationalised in 1939 to form British Overseas Airways Corporation (BOAC). Continental European and domestic flights were flown by a new airline, British European Airways (BEA) from 1946. BOAC introduced services to New York in 1946, Japan in 1948, Chicago in 1954 and the west coast of the United States in 1957. BEA developed a domestic network to various points in the United Kingdom, including Belfast, Edinburgh, Glasgow and Manchester.
  • From 1946 until 1960, BOAC and BEA were the principal British operators of scheduled international passenger and cargo services – and they preserved Britain’s pioneering role in the industry. The 1950s saw the world enter the passenger jet era – led by BOAC, with the Comet flying to Johannesburg in 1952, halving the previous flight time.
  • Additional airlines began to pass into BEA’s ownership and in 1967, the Government recommended a holding board be responsible for BOAC and BEA, with the establishment of a second force airline, resulting in British Caledonian being born in 1970.
  • Two years later, the businesses of BOAC and BEA were combined under the newly formed British Airways Board, with the separate airlines coming together as British Airways in 1974.
  • In July 1979, the Government announced its intention to sell shares in British Airways and in February 1987 British Airways was privatised.

 

British Airways to paint a Boeing 747-400 in the BOAC livery, the first of legacy liveries

Best Seller

British Airways has made this announcement:

As part of its 100-year birthday, British Airways has announced it will be painting a Boeing 747-400 in the much-admired design of its predecessor British Overseas Airways Corporation (BOAC).

The livery from the 1964 – 1974 BOAC era will adorn a Boeing 747-400, registration G-BYGC (below).

In "Chatham Dockyard' livery, to be repainted in BOAC retro livery in February 2019

Above Copyright Photo: British Airways Boeing 747-436 G-BYGC (msn 25823) LHR (SPA). Image: 945336.

The aircraft will leave the paint shop in Dublin and arrive in to Heathrow on February 18, before entering service the following day. This coincides with the 50th anniversary of the first Boeing 747 flight only a few days earlier.

A Boeing 747 long-range wide-body four engined commercial jet airliner for the BOAC – British Overseas Airways Corporation flying above the United Kingdom on 7 April 1971. (Photo by Fox Photos/Hulton Archive/Getty Images).

The BOAC 747 will be the first aircraft to receive a popular design from British Airways’ past with more details of further designs to be revealed in due course. Aircraft which receive the retro liveries will fly British Airways’ routes, proudly showcasing some of the popular designs as part of the airline’s centenary celebrations.

All new aircraft entering the fleet, including the Airbus A350, will continue to receive today’s popular Chatham Dockyard design.

Alex Cruz, British Airways’ Chairman and CEO, said: “So many British Airways customers and colleagues have fond memories of our previous liveries, regularly sharing their photos from across the globe, so it’s incredibly exciting to be re-introducing this classic BOAC design.

“Our history has shaped who we are today, so our centenary is the perfect moment to revisit our heritage and the UK’s aviation landscape through this iconic livery.”

The 747 has been deliberately chosen for the BOAC livery as it is a later variant of the same aircraft type that adorned the design when it was initially in operation.

The BOAC livery will remain on the Boeing 747-400 until it retires in 2023. By this time, British Airways will have retired the majority of its 747 fleet, replacing them with new state-of-the-art long-haul aircraft. This includes taking delivery of 18 A350s and 12 Boeing 787 Dreamliners in the next four years – which feature new cabins and are more environmentally efficient – as well as another 26 short-haul aircraft, all part of the airline’s £6.5bn investment for customers.

A potted history of BA:

  • On August 25, 1919, British Airways’ forerunner company, Aircraft Transport and Travel Limited (AT&T), launched the world’s first daily international scheduled air service between London and Paris.
  • In 1924, Britain’s four main fledgling airlines, which had by then evolved into Instone, Handley Page, Daimler Airways (a successor to AT&T), and British Air Marine Navigation Company Limited, merged to form Imperial Airways Limited.
  • By 1925, Imperial Airways was providing services to Paris, Brussels, Basle, Cologne and Zurich.  Meanwhile, a number of smaller UK air transport companies had started flights and in 1935, they merged to form the original privately-owned British Airways Limited, which became Imperial Airways’ principal UK competitor on European routes.
  • Following a Government review, Imperial Airways and British Airways were nationalised in 1939 to form British Overseas Airways Corporation (BOAC). Continental European and domestic flights were flown by a new airline, British European Airways (BEA) from 1946. BOAC introduced services to New York in 1946, Japan in 1948, Chicago in 1954 and the west coast of the United States in 1957. BEA developed a domestic network to various points in the United Kingdom, including Belfast, Edinburgh, Glasgow and Manchester.
  • From 1946 until 1960, BOAC and BEA were the principal British operators of scheduled international passenger and cargo services – and they preserved Britain’s pioneering role in the industry. The 1950s saw the world enter the passenger jet era – led by BOAC, with the Comet flying to Johannesburg in 1952, halving the previous flight time.
  • Additional airlines began to pass into BEA’s ownership and in 1967, the Government recommended a holding board be responsible for BOAC and BEA, with the establishment of a second force airline, resulting in British Caledonian being born in 1970.
  • Two years later, the businesses of BOAC and BEA were combined under the newly formed British Airways Board, with the separate airlines coming together as British Airways in 1974.
  • In July 1979, the Government announced its intention to sell shares in British Airways and in February 1987 British Airways was privatised.

Top Copyright Photo: BOAC (British Overseas Airways Corporation) Boeing 747-136 G-AWNC (msn 19763) JFK (Bruce Drum). Image: 102915.

BOAC aircraft slide show:

British Airways retires Boeing 747-400 G-BNLK

British Airways Boeing 747-436 G-BNLK (msn 24053) LHR (SPA). Image: 945271.

British Airways has retired the second Boeing 747-400 from the “Final 36”. The pictured G-BNLK is was ferried to St. Athan after 28 years of faithful service.

G-BNLK was delivered to BA on May 25, 1990.

BA is expected to retire the last Boeing 747 in February 2024. 18 are being replaced with new Airbus A350-1000s. Half of the remaining 747 fleet is expected to be retired by 2021.

Top Copyright Photo (all others by BA): British Airways Boeing 747-436 G-BNLK (msn 24053) LHR (SPA). Image: 945271.

British Airways aircraft slide show (current):

British Airways aircraft slide show (historic):

Below Copyright Photo: British Airways Boeing 747-436 G-BNLK (msn 24053) (interim livery) (Bruce Drum Collection). Image: 944843.

1997 interim livery

Bottom Copyright Photo: British Airways Boeing 747-436 G-BNLK (msn 24053) (Water Dreaming) LHR (SPA). Image: 945270.

BA's 1997 "Ngapa Jukurrpa - Water Dreaming" livery

Video:

Wi-Fi taking off on board British Airways

British Airways has made this announcement:

British Airways has started powering some of its long-haul aircraft with high-speed Wi-Fi, with its first three connected aircraft now in service.  The airline will connect 118 of its long haul aircraft over the next two years.

Customers will be advised of the availability of Wi-Fi when they board a connected aircraft allowing them to browse and stream from the comfort of their seat.

Using the latest generation technology, British Airways will provide high-speed bandwidth to customers, with internet being available approximately 10 minutes after take-off when the aircraft has passed 10,000ft. The portal will work with the latest operating systems from Apple, Android and Windows, allowing customers to connect on a variety of devices.

To celebrate the launch, British Airways is partnering with Visa to connect customers on board the first Wi-Fi enabled flights. For a limited time, customers will be able to connect to high speed Wi-Fi and enjoy an hour of free browsing and streaming, courtesy of Visa.

Customers can choose from two paid-for Wi-Fi packages including the ‘Browse’ package, which supports internet surfing, social media and WhatsApp, or the ‘Stream’ package, which supports streaming of music and entertainment, from the very best online content services, including Netflix*. The packages are available to purchase for one hour, four hours or the full flight.

Staying connected is important to our customers who want to be able to work, browse and stream in the air. They can now look forward to enjoying the latest generation Wi-Fi across our long haul fleet over the next two years.”

British Airways has launched its multi-million pound investment plan to benefit its customers with a focus on excellence in the premium cabins and more choice and quality for all.

Six hundred million pounds will be spent on Club World with an emphasis on improved catering and sleep, and a new seat in the future. At Heathrow a First Wing check-in area with direct security and lounge access has launched, and lounges around the airline’s network are to be revamped and improved. The Club Europe cabin has also been introduced on UK domestic services and all customers can look forward to the latest generation Wi-Fi across British Airways’ long-haul and short-haul fleets over the next two years.

Prices for the Browse package begin from £4.99 and Stream from £7.99.

* Netflix allows customers to pick from Hollywood movies, top TV shows, documentaries, independent films, stand-up comedy, a wide range of kids titles and the latest new Netflix’s Original such as Bright or Altered Carbon.

Top Photo: British Airways.

British Airways aircraft slide show (Boeing):

Below Copyright Photo: British Airways Boeing 747-436 G-BYGG (msn 28859) LHR (SPA). Image: 929324.

British Airways Boeing 747-436 G-BYGG (msn 28859) LHR (SPA). Image: 929324.