Tag Archives: FAA

Federal Aviation Administration adopts stricter unruly passenger policy

FAA Administrator Steve Dickson has signed an order (PDF) directing a stricter legal enforcement policy against unruly airline passengers in the wake of recent, troubling incidents.

The FAA has seen a disturbing increase in incidents where airline passengers have disrupted flights with threatening or violent behavior. These incidents have stemmed both from passengers’ refusals to wear masks and from recent violence at the U.S. Capitol.

“Flying is the safest mode of transportation and I signed this order to keep it that way,” Administrator Dickson said.

Historically, the agency has addressed unruly-passenger incidents using a variety of methods ranging from warnings and counseling to civil penalties. Effective immediately, however, the FAA will not address these cases with warnings or counseling. The agency will pursue legal enforcement action against any passenger who assaults, threatens, intimidates, or interferes with airline crew members. This policy will be in effect through March 30, 2021.

Passengers who interfere with, physically assault, or threaten to physically assault aircraft crew or anyone else on an aircraft face stiff penalties, including fines of up to $35,000 and imprisonment. This dangerous behavior can distract, disrupt, and threaten crew members’ safety functions.

The FAA has initiated more than 1,300 enforcement actions against unruly passengers during the past 10 years, including recent cases for allegedly interfering with and assaulting flight attendants who instructed them to wear masks.

While the FAA does not have regulatory authority over aviation security or no-fly lists, the agency works closely with federal law enforcement and national security partners on any reported security threats that may impact aviation safety.

Watch a video message from Administrator Dickson:

Reuters: FAA in final stages of Boeing 737 MAX review; could approve as early as November 18

From Reuters:

“The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration is in the final stages of reviewing proposed changes to Boeing Co’s 737 MAX and expects to complete the process in the “coming days,” the agency’s chief told Reuters on Monday.”

Read the full report.

 

Reuters: FAA expands area to inspect for cracks in Boeing 737 NG planes

From Reuters:

“The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) said on Tuesday it was revising its order requiring checks for structural cracks in Boeing 737 NG planes to cover a larger area after the company said additional cracks had been found.”

Read the full report.

Washington Post: After two faulty Boeing jets crash, the Trump administration blames foreign pilots

Opinion by Dana Milbank of the Washington Post. To read the column CLICK HERE

From Wikipedia:

Daniel Kevin Elwell is the Acting Administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) in addition to running the Next Generation Air Transportation System.

Appointed by President Donald Trump to become the FAA Deputy Administrator in June 2017, Elwell was promoted to Acting Administrator on January 7, 2018.

Videos:

FAA issues a new AD for all Boeing 787 Dreamliners

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued this airworthiness directive (AD):

We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for all The Boeing Company Model 787 series airplanes. This AD was prompted by reports of hydraulic leakage caused by damage to aileron and elevator actuators from lightning strikes. This AD requires an inspection or records check to inspect for certain parts, detailed inspections of aileron and elevator power control units (PCUs), and applicable on-condition actions. We are issuing this AD to address the unsafe condition on these products.

Former Delta executive nominated to head the FAA

AOPA issued this statement:

The White House announced today that longtime Delta Air Lines executive Steve Dickson is its nominee to lead the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

Pending Senate confirmation, Dickson will succeed Dan Elwell, who has been serving as acting administrator for the past 14 months, following Michael Huerta’s retirement from the agency.

 

Dickson was with Delta for 27 years, retiring in 2018 as senior vice president of global flight operations. During his tenure with the airline, he was responsible for training, technical support, and regulatory compliance for more than 13,000 pilots. He is a graduate of the U.S. Air Force Academy and flew F-15s during his military career.

 

News of Dickson’s nomination has generated positive feedback from industry officials and stakeholders, including AOPA President and CEO Mark Baker. Baker worked alongside Dickson on the NextGen Advisory Committee, which has been instrumental in prioritizing air traffic control modernization initiatives.

 

In the past, Dickson has been outspoken against ATC privatization, calling it “reckless” as it would disrupt the progress of NextGen implementation.

 

Baker commented, “Steve Dickson is a solid choice to lead the FAA.  His in-depth knowledge of our aviation system, keen awareness of general aviation as well as the challenges before us make him the right choice to lead the agency.  I am hopeful the Senate will move to confirm Mr. Dickson as quickly as possible.”

 

“We also commend Acting Administrator Dan Elwell for his unwavering commitment and dedication to serving the nation, the FAA, and the aviation industry. He’s done a great job in that role,” added Baker.

 

As FAA administrator, Dickson will guide a $17.5 billion dollar budget and oversee 47,000 employees. Should he be confirmed by the Senate, Dickson would serve a five-year term.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has reversed its course from yesterday, and will now ground all U.S. registered Boeing 737-8 MAX 8s and 737-9 MAX 9s. This will effectively ground all MAX airplanes. The FAA claims to have “new evidence”. Either way, they are now in agreement with the rest of the world.

Statement:

The FAA is ordering the temporary grounding of Boeing 737 MAX aircraft (PDF)operated by U.S. airlines or in U.S. territory. The agency made this decision as a result of the data gathering process and new evidence collected at the site and analyzed today. This evidence, together with newly refined satellite data available to FAA this morning, led to this decision.

The grounding will remain in effect pending further investigation, including examination of information from the aircraft’s flight data recorders and cockpit voice recorders. An FAA team is in Ethiopia assisting the NTSB as parties to the investigation of the Flight 302 accident. The agency will continue to investigate.

 


 

FAA Administrator takes “no action” at this time, will continue to review

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Administrator, Daniel K. Elwell has issued this statement:

Boeing also issued this statement:

Safety is Boeing’s number one priority and we have full confidence in the safety of the 737 MAX. We understand that regulatory agencies and customers have made decisions that they believe are most appropriate for their home markets. We’ll continue to engage with them to ensure they have the information needed to have confidence in operating their fleets. The United States Federal Aviation Administration is not mandating any further action at this time, and based on the information currently available, we do not have any basis to issue new guidance to operators.

From Wikipedia:

Daniel Elwell is the Acting Administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) in addition to running the Next Generation Air Transportation System.

Appointed by President Donald Trump to become a FAA Deputy Administrator in June 2017, Elwell was promoted to Acting Administrator on January 7, 2018.

Elwell graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in International Affairs from the United States Air Force Academy. He moved on to Williams Air Force Base where he earned his pilot wings.

Elwell was a Command Pilot for the U.S Air Force and U.S Air Force Reserve. Elwell fought in the Operation Desert Storm in a combat capacity. Elwell eventually reached the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. He retired soon after.

For 16 years, Elwell was a commercial pilot for American Airlines. Elwell also had a role of American Airlines’s Managing Director for International and Government Affairs. He also served served as a legislative fellow for the late Senator Ted Stevens. While working for Senator Stevens, Elwell was part of other aviation safety programs in Alaska, including the Capstone Program in the Yukon–Kuskokwim Delta, as well as the installation of real-time weather cameras at remote airfields and mountain passes.

Elwell was named Vice President of the Aerospace Industries Association in 2008 where he stayed until 2013. Elwell was a civil aerospace manufacturer representative in this capacity where he was an advocate for various companies.

Elwell joined Airlines for America (A4A) in 2013 where he was the Senior Vice President for Safety, Security, and Operations. Elwell left this role in 2015.

Elwell also served as the Senior Advisor on Aviation to Secretary Elaine Chao.

FAA Issues Emergency Airworthiness Directive (EAD) for CFM56-7B engines

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) issued an Emergency Airworthiness Directive (EAD) that requires operators to inspect fan blades on certain CFM56-7B engines within 20 days.

The directive is based on a CFM International Service Bulletin issued today and on information gathered from the investigation of Tuesday’s Southwest Airlines engine failure. The inspection requirement applies to CFM56-7B engines. Specifically, engines with more than 30,000 total cycles from new must complete inspections within 20 days.  The EAD becomes effective upon publication. The engine manufacturer estimates today’s corrective action affects 352 engines in the U.S. and 681 engines worldwide.

Southwest Airlines issued this short statement:

Southwest Airlines Company acknowledges the issuance of Emergency Airworthiness Directive (AD) 2018-09-51 by the Federal Aviation Administration to airlines operating CFM56-7B engines. The existing Southwest Airlines maintenance program meets or exceeds all the requirements specified in the Airworthiness Directive.

Photos: Southwest Airlines.