Hawaiian Airlines March and first quarter 2020 traffic statistics reflect effects of COVID-19

Hawaiian has issued this report on the affects of the coronavirus crisis:

Hawaiian Airlines, Inc., a subsidiary of Hawaiian Holdings, Inc., saw sharp declines in its system-wide traffic statistics in March 2020 as government mandated restrictions on travel in response to the COVID-19 pandemic became more numerous.

Demand declines that began with U.S. government restrictions on Chinese arrivals in late January accelerated in mid-March, when governments in Australia, New Zealand, Tahiti, American Samoa and Hawai’i instituted requirements of self-isolation or quarantine for incoming arrivals. Hawaiian Airlines has responded to the diminishing demand by reducing its scheduled service systemwide by 95 percent through April 2020.

The table below summarizes March and year-to-date statistics compared to the respective prior-year periods. In light of Hawaiian’s substantially reduced schedule in April and likelihood of similar reductions in May, Hawaiian emphasized that the results shown below should not be construed as indicative of future results.

SYSTEM-WIDE OPERATIONS1

MARCH

2020

2019

% CHANGE

PAX

542,456

993,548

(45.4)%

RPMs (000)

851,022

1,439,227

(40.9)%

ASMs (000)

1,466,774

1,665,067

(11.9)%

LF

58.0%

86.4%

(28.4) pts

YEAR-TO-DATE

2020

2019

% CHANGE

PAX

2,362,196

2,822,634

(16.3)%

RPMs (000)

3,714,773

4,128,485

(10.0)%

ASMs (000)

4,979,529

4,851,921

2.6%

LF

74.6%

85.1%

(10.5) pts

PAX

Passengers transported

RPM

Revenue Passenger Mile; one paying passenger transported one mile

ASM

Available Seat Mile; one seat transported one mile

LF

Load Factor; percentage of seating capacity filled

1Includes the operations of contract carriers under capacity purchase agreements.

Ever wondered how our cargo business got started? When Honolulu experienced a shortage of meat in 1942, Fagan Ranch on Molokaʻi decided it would ship its cattle meat to Honolulu in our Sikorsky S-38 plane, along with anything else that needed to be hauled. This gave airline officials the idea of operating an air-freight service to the outer islands. Thus, on March 20, 1942, Hawaiian Airlines became the first airline in the nation to receive a U.S. air cargo certificate.

Photo: Hawaiian Airlines.

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