Tag Archives: 40692

Boeing donates 787-8 N787BX (ZA003) to the Museum of Flight

Boeing (Chicago and Seattle) and its employees on November 8 joined the Puget Sound community in celebrating the donation of one of the original 787-8 Dreamliner (N787BX, msn 40692) flight test airplanes to the Museum of Flight in Seattle.

The Dreamliner Boeing donated to the museum is known as ZA003 (N787BX), the third 787-8 produced. The airplane has a unique past, first as part of the 787 flight test and certification program and later circumnavigating the globe several times in 2011 and 2012 during the Dream Tour, which introduced the 787 to more than 68,000 visitors in 23 countries.

“This revolutionary airplane caps the museum’s collection of historic commercial airplanes, beginning with our 1932 Boeing 247, which was the first all-metal, modern airliner,” said Doug King, president and CEO, Museum of Flight. “It was followed by our 1969 prototype 747, the first jumbo jet, and now with the first composite airliner, the 787. It’s an incredible addition to our comprehensive display.”

The celebration at the Museum of Flight included several Boeing employees whose work over the years played a role in the design, build and test of the 787 Dreamliner. Each person disembarked the airplane and presented a special artifact tied to the history of the airplane to museum docents and students from local high schools.

The artifacts given by employees ranged from a commemorative cachet carried aboard the 787’s first flight, to early artist renderings of the 7E7. Those artifacts will now be housed at the Museum of Flight.

ZA003 is the first of three flight test 787-8s Boeing plans to share with museums around the world, the aviation community and future generations of employees and airplane enthusiasts.

About The Museum of Flight:

The independent, non-profit Museum of Flight is one of the largest air and space museums in the world, attracting more than 500,000 visitors annually. The Museum’s collection includes more than 160 historically significant air- and spacecraft, the original manufacturing facility of The Boeing Company, and the world’s only full-scale NASA Space Shuttle Trainer. The Museum’s aviation and space library and archives are the largest on the West Coast. More than 130,000 individuals are served annually by the Museum’s on-site and outreach educational programs. The Museum of Flight is accredited by the American Association of Museums, and is an Affiliate of the Smithsonian Institution.

The Museum of Flight is located at 9404 E. Marginal Way S., Seattle, Exit 158 off Interstate 5 on Boeing Field halfway between downtown Seattle and Sea-Tac Airport. The Museum is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Top Copyright Photo: Ariel Shocron/AirlinersGallery.com. N787BX stopped at Madrid on its Dream Tour.

Bottom Copyright Photo: Boeing. Boeing 787-8 N787BX is pictured at its new home at Boeing Field.

Boeing 787-8 N787BX (Grd)(Museum of Flight) BFI (Boeing)(LRW)

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Boeing 787s to be repaired in the order they were delivered

Boeing (Chicago) is aggressively moving ahead to make 787 battery system changes on a worldwide basis. Boeing has already dispatched teams to locations around the world to begin installing improved battery systems on the already delivered 787s. Kits with the parts needed for the new battery systems are staged for shipment and new batteries also will be shipped immediately. Teams have been assigned to customer locations to install the new systems.  According to Boeing, airplanes will be modified in approximately the order they were delivered. ANA was the first to take delivery. Boeing has issued this statement:

With the FAA approval of the battery system improvements for the 787 Dreamliner by the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) clears the way for Boeing and its customers to install the approved modifications and will lead to a return to service and resumption of new production deliveries.

“FAA approval clears the way for us and the airlines to begin the process of returning the 787 to flight with continued confidence in the safety and reliability of this game-changing new airplane,” said Boeing Chairman, President and CEO Jim McNerney. “The promise of the 787 and the benefits it provides to airlines and their passengers remain fully intact as we take this important step forward with our customers and program partners.”

The FAA’s action will permit the return to service of 787s in the United States upon installation of the improvements. For 787s based and modified outside the United States, local regulatory authorities provide the final approval on return to service.

Approval of the improved 787 battery system was granted by the FAA after the agency conducted an extensive review of certification tests.  The tests were designed to validate that individual components of the battery, as well as its integration with the charging system and a new enclosure, all performed as expected during normal operation and under failure conditions. Testing was conducted under the supervision of the FAA over a month-long period beginning in early March.

“The FAA set a high bar for our team and our solution,” said McNerney. “We appreciate the diligence, expertise and professionalism of the FAA’s technical team and the leadership of FAA Administrator Michael Huerta and Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood throughout this process.  Our shared commitment with global regulators and our customers to safe, efficient and reliable airplanes has helped make air travel the safest form of transportation in the world today.”

Boeing, in collaboration with its supplier partners and in support of the investigations of the National Transportation Safety Board and the Japan Transport Safety Board, conducted extensive engineering analysis and testing to develop a thorough understanding of the factors that could have caused the 787’s batteries to fail and overheat in two incidents last January.  The team spent more than 100,000 hours developing test plans, building test rigs, conducting tests and analyzing the results to ensure the proposed solutions met all requirements.

“Our team has worked tirelessly to develop a comprehensive solution that fully satisfies the FAA and its global counterparts, our customers and our own high standards for safety and reliability,” said Boeing Commercial Airplanes President and CEO Ray Conner. “Through the skill and dedication of the Boeing team and our partners, we achieved that objective and made a great airplane even better.”

Boeing also engaged a team of more than a dozen battery experts from across multiple industries, government, academia and consumer safety to review and validate the company’s assumptions, findings, proposed solution and test plan.

The improved battery system includes design changes to both prevent and isolate a fault should it occur. In addition, improved production, operating and testing processes have been implemented. The new steel enclosure system is designed to keep any level of battery overheating from affecting the airplane or even being noticed by passengers.

“This is a comprehensive and permanent solution with multiple layers of protection,” said Conner.  “The ultimate layer of protection is the new enclosure, which will ensure that even if a battery fails, there is no impact to the airplane and no possibility of fire. We have the right solution in hand, and we are ready to go.

“We are all very grateful to our customers for their patience during the past several months,” said Conner. “We know it hasn’t been easy on them to have their 787s out of service and their deliveries delayed. We look forward to helping them get back into service as quickly as possible.”

Boeing has deployed teams to locations around the world to begin installing improved battery systems on 787s. Kits with the parts needed for the new battery systems are staged for shipment and new batteries also will be shipped immediately. Teams have been assigned to customer locations to install the new systems.  Airplanes will be modified in approximately the order they were delivered.

“The Boeing team is ready to help get our customers’ 787s back in the air where they belong,” said Conner.

Boeing will also begin installing the changes on new airplanes at the company’s two 787 final-assembly plants, with deliveries expected to resume in the weeks ahead. Despite the disruption in deliveries that began in January, Boeing expects to complete all planned 2013 deliveries by the end of the year. Boeing further expects that the 787 battery issue will have no significant impact to its 2013 financial guidance.

Copyright Photo: Michael B. Ing. A close-up of Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner N787BX (msn 40692) “ZA003” test aircraft with probes for early testing.

The Boeing 787 Dreamliner arrives at Farnborough

Copyright Photo: David Apps. N787BX also performed a nice fly-by at FAB before landing showing off its sleek lines.

Copyright Photo: James Mepsted.

Boeing (Chicago, Seattle, Wichita and Charleston) brought its 787-8 N787BX (msn 40692) to the Farnborough Air Show today, arriving at 9:08 a.m (0908) local time.

Read the full Reuters report:

CLICK HERE

Copyright Photo: James Mepsted. N787BX is on UK ground at FAB on July 18.

Boeing is bringing 787-8 N787BX (ZA003) to Farnborough

Boeing (Chicago, Seattle, Wichita and Charleston) will make 787 Dreamliner international debut this month when the doors open on the Farnborough International Airshow outside of London.

The 787 flight-test airplane, ZA003 (N787BX), will touch down at Farnborough the morning of Sunday, July 18 and will remain on static display through mid-day July 20. The airplane will be open for tours on a scheduled basis July 19 and 20. Boeing is using ZA003 to test and certify seats, galleys and associated cabin safety and comfort systems, among other test points.

Boeing’s exhibit at the show will focus on unmanned systems, including the international debut of the recently unveiled Phantom Ray demonstrator, the A160 Hummingbird and the Unmanned Little Bird. The Boeing Unmanned Systems Display will showcase more than a dozen products, including the new Integrator and the ScanEagle Compressed Carriage.

During the show’s daily flying demonstration, Boeing will demonstrate the capabilities of its advanced, combat-proven, multi-role F/A-18E/F Super Hornet fighter. The company and its customers will display several other systems, including the air show debut of the 737-based Peace Eagle airborne early warning and control platform for the Turkish Air Force. Visitors also will see the C-17 Globemaster III military transport; the F-15E Eagle fighter jet; and the AH-64D Apache Longbow attack helicopter. In addition, Qatar Airways will display its newest Boeing 777-300 ER July 19-22.

Second Quarter deliveries:

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Copyright Photo: Joe G. Walker. 787-8 N787BX (msn 40692) is pictured on the runway at Seattle (Boeing Field-King County).

Boeing tests 787-8 N787BX in simulated airline service

Boeing (Chicago, Seattle, Wichita and Charleston) on April 15 tested the third 787, 787-8 N787BX (msn 40692) with the call sign of “Boeing 003 Heavy Experimental” (ZA003). The jetliner flew four times that day in a simulated airline service.

Yesterday (April 18) N787BX became the first 787 to complete a transcontinental flight. BOE3 flew from Seattle (BFI) to Eglin AFB, FL. Previously ZA002 flew to Victorville, CA.

Copyright Photo: Joe G. Walker. 787-8 N787BX (msn 40692) is pictured at Seattle (Boeing Field/King County) prior to to the transcon flight.