Tag Archives: 757-2T7

Monarch Airlines retires its last three Boeing 757-200s

Monarch Airlines (London-Luton) as planned retired its last three Boeing 757-200s (G-DAJB, G-MONJ and G-MONK) this past week with the end of the summer season schedule.

The last flight was operated with G-MONK on a return charter flight from London (Gatwick) to
Krakow on November 12 as flights MON 9064 and MON 9065 returning late in the evening. G-MONK was then ferried from Gatwick Airport to Birmingham (BHX) for the end of lease checks.

All three of the Boeing 757s are currently at BHX awaiting their fate.

 

The airline is now all-Airbus ironically until those aircraft are replaced with new Boeing 737 MAX 8s.

Monarch has published this nice salute the venerable type on its Monarch blog:

Monarch has bid a sad but fond farewell to its Boeing 757s this month after years of tremendous service within the fleet. The Boeing 757 had a very interesting life within the fleet, due to it’s phenomenal flexibility and wide range and payload capabilities. It has served with Monarch all over the world and has probably seen more corners of the globe than our Airbus A300 or A330 wide body aircraft.

As word got out in the press and via social media that Monarch’s Boeing 757s were retiring, we received lots of interesting questions about the aircraft from you. In response, we’d like to share some of the beloved aircraft’s wonderful history and key stats with you. We’ve turned to passionate Boeing 757 enthusiast Toby Hiller, Monarch’s Senior Economic Planning Analyst, for his expertise.

Can you tell us a bit more about the history of the Boeing 757 fleet?

Between November 1993 and November 2014, Monarch’s Boeing 757 fleet operated planned flights to 439 airports in 128 countries and territories worldwide, including glamorous destinations such as New York, Rio de Janeiro, Cape Town, Bangkok, Tokyo, Singapore and Sydney! The furthest airport from Luton that the aircraft served was Auckland, New Zealand.

How many passenger seats/capacity does a Boeing 757 have?

With extra legroom seats the aircraft has 229 seats; without the extra legroom seats it has 235 seats. Interestingly, if the capacity is set up in a VIP “Captain’s Choice” configuration (which we operated on special charter flights – see below) then there is 92 business class seats and 12 economy seats.

Monarch 757-200 G-MONJ (02-Captain's Choice)(Grd)(Monarch)(LR)

Is there a fixed amount of staff needed for a Boeing 757?

The amount of crew needed for a Boeing 757 flight is subject to the length of the flight. A standard Monarch ZB short haul flight has 2 pilots (a captain and first officer) and 6 cabin crew serving our customers but this could change to 3 pilots and 8 cabin crew on long-range flights. It is interesting to know that VIP flights are subject to charterer requirements and on VIP flights an engineer would also travel.

How many toilets does a Monarch Boeing 757 have?

There are 2 toilets located at the front of the aircraft, 2 more at “door 3” which is further down the plane, so there are 4 in total.

How many galleys are there?

There are 2. There is a galley at the front of the aircraft and 1 at the rear. On VIP flights, a chef’s station could also be added to prepare fresh meals for customers.

What is the maximum take-off weight of the Boeing 757 aircraft?

Maximum take-off weight (MTOW): 113,398 kg

Top Copyright Photo: Antony J. Best/AirlinersGallery.com (all others by Monarch). One of the most colorful liveries worn by a Monarch 757 is the pictured Boeing 757-2T7 G-MONJ (msn 24104) that wore the the second version of the special “Hedkandi” color scheme.

Monarch Airlines aircraft slide show:

Video: A full flight on board G-DAJB from London (Gatwick) to Faro:

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Monarch Airlines secures an AOC from EASA

Monarch Airlines (London-Luton) has secured an European Air Operators Certificate (AOC) from EASA. The company issued this statement:

Monarch, the leading scheduled airline to leisure destinations is the first major UK airline to have completed all requirements for the issue of an EASA Air Operators Certificate (AOC). The main feature of the new EASA regulations is the introduction of a mandatory Safety Management System (SMS) by which each operator must demonstrate a robust safety culture and a risk based approach to all aspects of aircraft operations. Monarch Airlines’ new AOC will become effective from October 28, 2014; allowing the carrier to continue to operate as a transport category airline under the new regulations.

The civil aviation regulation is to be harmonized at European level by October 28, 2014, meaning all airlines must conform to EASA regulations by this point. The airlines transition involved the production of compliant Operations Manuals and the introduction of new Safety Management and Compliance Monitoring Manuals to meet the requirements of the new Implementing Rules (IRs). Monarch Airlines’ prompt submission of the relevant documents to the UK CAA for approval was eight weeks ahead of the deadline.

Copyright Photo: Ton Jochems/AirlinersGallery.com. Monarch will phase out is last three Boeing 757-200s at the end of the summer 2014 season ending a long era with the twin jet. However the company will remain a Boeing operator with its upcoming order for 30 Boeing 737 MAX 8s. Boeing 757-2T7 G-DAJB (msn 23770) taxies past the camera at Palma de Mallorca (PMI).

Monarch Airlines: AG Slide Show

Is Monarch Airlines close to ordering Boeing jets?

Monarch Airlines (London-Luton) may be close to renewing its connection with Boeing. The airline currently operates three Boeing 757-200s which are being replaced with newer Airbus A321s. Monarch has had a long association with Boeing dating back to the 707s and 720Bs and the 737 Classics (-200s and -300s).

According to Reuters, citing industry sources, the British airline is close to ordering 30 aircraft from Boeing. The aircraft were unspecified. Could it be new Boeing 737 MAX aircraft?

In August 2006, Monarch ordered six Boeing 787-8 Dreamliners but this was cancelled in September 2011 as the airline stated it has “reassessed its decision”.

If correct, this would possibly unseat Airbus as the carrier’s main supplier of aircraft.

Read the full article: CLICK HERE

Copyright Photo: Paul Denton/AirlinersGallery.com. The historic connection to Boeing is fading fast. The last Boeing 757s will be phased out at the end of the current summer season. Boeing 757-2T7 G-MONJ (msn 24104) departs from Geneva.

Monarch Airlines:

Pace Airlines suspends all operations

 

Copyright Photo: Jay Selman.  Please click on photo for full view, information and other photos.

Copyright Photo: Jay Selman. Please click on photo for full view, information and other photos.

Pace Airlines (Winston-Salem) yesterday (September 11) laid off its remaining employees and suspended all operations. This represents the second major employee job cut this week. 175-215 employees were let go on Tuesday. The company is currently under investigation by the U.S. Department of Labor for alleged non-payment of employees and has been promising to pay its employees for all deferred payments. Pace is also suing DirectAir’s parent for breach of contract. Charter operations began in 1996 flying a single Boeing 737-200 (N487GS) for the Charlotte Hornets.

 

News link with all of the details:

www2.journalnow.com/content/2009/sep/11/111459/pace-sues-south-carolina-airline-breach-contract/news-local/