Tag Archives: Andreas Lubitz

The New York Times: FAA raised questions about Andreas Lubitz’s depression before Germanings crash

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The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) (Washington) raised questions in 2010 on whether it should have granted a pilot’s license to Andreas Lubitz according to report by the New York Times. Lubitz in March flew his Germanwings Airbus A320 into a mountain in the French Alps killing all aboard.

Read the full report: CLICK HERE

Germanwings’ Lubitz informed the Pilot School that he had a “previous episode of severe depression”, Lufthansa cancels its 60th Anniversary celebrations

Andreas Lubitz

Germanwings’ (2nd) (Cologne/Bonn) First Officer Andreas Lubitz “informed the Flight Training Pilot School in 2009, in the medical documents he submitted in connection with resuming his flight training, about a “previous episode of severe depression” according to a Lufthansa statement after an internal review. Despite this, Lubitz was deemed fit to fly after receiving his medical certificate.

Lufthansa has issued this full statement:

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The co-pilot of Germanwings flight 4U 9525 interrupted his pilot training at the Flight Training Pilot School for several months. Thereafter the co-pilot received the medical certificate confirming his fitness to fly.

To ensure a swift and seamless clarification, Lufthansa – after further internal investigations – has submitted additional documents to the Düsseldorf Public Prosecutor, particularly training and medical documents. These also include the email correspondence of the copilot with the Flight Training Pilot School. In this correspondence he informed the Flight Training Pilot School in 2009, in the medical documents he submitted in connection with resuming his flight training, about a “previous episode of severe depression”.

Lufthansa will continue to provide the investigating authorities with its full and unlimited support. We therefore ask for your understanding that we cannot provide any further statements at this time, because we do not wish to anticipate the ongoing investigation by the Düsseldorf Public Prosecutor.

As already confirmed last Thursday to the public the co-pilot held a fully valid class 1 medical certificate during flight duty on March 24, 2015.

In other news, Lufthansa is canceling its 60th Anniversary celebrations. The company issued this statement:

Out of respect for the crash victims of flight 4U 9525 Lufthansa is canceling the originally planned festivities for the 60th anniversary of the company, which was planned for April 15, 2015.

Instead of the originally planned anniversary event, Lufthansa will provide a live broadcast for its employees, of the official state ceremony in the Cologne Cathedral on the 17th of April 2015, where the bereaved families and friends will gather to remember the victims.

Photo: FO Andreas Lubitz from his Facebook page.

Germanwings pilot Andreas Lubitz hid a medical illness from the airline

Andreas Lubitz

German investigators have discovered a medical leave note from a doctor issued for Germanwings first officer Andreas Lubitz (above) that included the day of the French Alps crash, the Dusseldorf public prosecutor’s office said, according to CNN.

Lubitz tore up the medical leave slips and kept the undisclosed illness secret from his employer. It is suspected the illness could have prevented him from advancing in his aviation career.

Note: The German prosecutor has just confirmed it was a medical illness (not a mental condition). It has been reported he was deemed “unfit for work” and was hiding this information according to German investigators.

Read the full story from CNN: CLICK HERE

Video message by Lufthansa CEO Carsten Spohr:

Lufthansa CEO and Germanwings CEO: We are “speechless and shocked”

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Lufthansa CEO Carsten Spohr and Germanwings CEO Thomas Winkelmann just held a press conference in Cologne, Germany. Both CEOs (translated from German) said they were “speechless” and “shocked” at the latest developments. CEO Spohr confirmed the French prosecutor’s conclusion that the First Officer (FO) Andreas Lubitz, 28, denied access to the cockpit to the Captain and intentionally activated the descent and crashed the Germanwings Airbus A320 into the mountain.

FO Lubitz began training in 2008 and was hired in September 2013 and had 630 hours flying time. FO Lubitz passed all flight and medical tests. FO Lubitz “interrupted” his training for unknown reasons (but this is not uncommon). Lufthansa Group pilots do not go through psychological testing.

According to Lufthansa CEO Carsten Spohr, FO Andreas Lubitz was “100% fit to fly”. He continued, it remains a mystery and they have no idea why the FO would do this.

Andreas Lubitz

Above Photo: First Officer Andreas Lubitz on his Facebook page.

CEO Spohr also confirmed the pilot in the cockpit could override the code by keeping the door locked.

Unlike U.S. airlines, Lufthansa and Germanwings do not have a procedure to prevent a pilot from being alone in the cockpit. When asked if they would change their procedure to have a Flight Attendant enter the cockpit when one of the pilots leaves the cockpit, CEO Spohr said he did not see the need to change their current procedures but would review all of its cockpit procedures with experts.

Should European airlines have a “two person” cockpit rule? Please vote in the informal poll below:

 

Breaking News: Brice Robin: The Germanwings First Officer “accelerated the descent” in a “deliberate attempt to destroy the aircraft”

Germanwings #indeepsorrow

Brice Robin, Marseille Public Prosecutor, has just held a live press conference in Marseille (Marselles in English), France. According to the prosecutor, First Officer Andreas Lubitz, 28, a German citizen, intentionally locked the cockpit door and locked out the Captain. According to the prosecutor, the First Officer “accelerated the descent” to “deliberately attempt to destroy the aircraft”. The First Officer was heard to be breathing normally, eliminating the medical emergency theory.

Screams were heard by passengers at the end as the Airbus A320 slammed into the mountain.

150 people died in the tragic crash.

Since the accident is now an apparent crime, the BEA (Bureau d’Enquêtes et d’Analyses pour la sécurité de l’aviation civile), the Police and the Public Prosecutor will continue the investigation.

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