Tag Archives: Boeing 737-36N

Ukraine International retires its last Boeing 737 Classic

Type Retired: November 8, 2018 (flight AUI 718 Istanbul - Odessa with UR-GBD)

On Thursday, November 8, 2018, Ukraine International Airlines’ Boeing 737-300 aircraft with registration number of UR-GBD (below), operated its final flight under Ukraine International Airlines’ call sign.

Top Copyright Photo: Ukraine International Airlines Boeing 737-36N UR-GAN (msn 28569) (Official Carrier National Football Teams) LGW (Antony J. Best). Image: 901106.

Above Photo: Teemu Pesonen.

Subsequently UIA’s fleet consists of 42 aircraft with the average age of 10.5 years.

UIA continues its fleet renewal program. Three Classic Generation aircraft, including two Boeing 737-300 and one Boeing 737-500 were decommissioned. And now the company’s medium haul fleet includes only New Generation Boeing 737-800 and Boeing 737-900 with an average age of 8.7 years. These planes have bigger capacity and consume less fuel per seat kilometer.

In 1992 UIA became the first Boeing 737 family operator in Ukraine and offered its passengers a new level of comfort and service. Within 26 years of UIA’s activity the company used 74 aircraft, 42 of which currently keep flying under UIA’s call sign.

Moreover UIA was the first Ukrainian airline to install winglets on its planes increasing their fuel efficiency and reducing carbon dioxide emissions into atmosphere.

This year the airline added a new type of widebody long haul aircraft for the Ukrainian market – Boeing 777-200ER. Now three such aircraft operate UIA’s flights to New York, Beijing and Bangkok. The company also operates widebody Classic Generation Boeing 767-300ER aircraft on its long haul routes which will be phased out in 2019-2020.

“The Classic Generation aircraft, UIA had started its activity in 1992, played its role. We thank them, as they were reliable planes, which let us become the airline UIA is now. – UIA Communications Director Evgeniya Satska said, – The next step to UIA’s medium haul fleet renewal will be the arrival of three Boeing 737 MAX aircraft delivery. There start to be delivered in Spring 2019”.

Note: The last Boeing 737-500 (UR-GAT) (below) was retired previously on October 12, 2018 (flight AUI172 Stockholm – Kiev).

Below Copyright Photo (all others by the airline): Ukraine International Airlines Boeing 737-528 UR-GAT (msn 25237) LHR (SPA). Image: 924723.

Ukraine International aircraft slide show:

Type Retired: October 12, 2018 (flight AUI 172 Stockholm ARN - Kiev with UR-GAT)

New milestone agreement reached to merge First Air and Canadian North

Canadian North Boeing 737-36N C-FGCN (msn 28590) YYZ (TMK Photography). Image: 928273.

Makivik Corporation (Makivik) and the Inuvialuit Corporate Group (ICG) have announced they have signed a definitive agreement to merge First Air and Canadian North in order to provide the best possible air services across the Arctic.

Following the receipt of government regulatory approvals, Makivik and ICG will proceed to complete the merger. The parties expect to complete the transaction by the end of 2018.

The proposed Pan-Arctic airline will operate under the name Canadian North and aircraft will feature the new First Air livery, including its Inukshuk logo.

Headquarters for the proposed airline will be located in Ottawa. The two airlines first announced their intention to merge on July 6, 2018.

Customers of First Air and Canadian North will see continuity in operations while the merger is finalized. The parties are committed to keeping customers up-to-date on all developments related to schedules and commercial flights on an ongoing basis.

The new, wholly Inuit-owned airline intends to be an economic driver in the circumpolar region as one of the North’s largest private-sector employers. Offering more flights to more destinations, the new airline hopes to help expand Arctic tourism in the communities it serves by increasing demand for tourist-related businesses and services.

The parties are pleased to announce this merger will result in significant service improvements for their valued customers, including:

  • Improved schedule: Better time-of-day options on certain routes, enabling day trips;
  • Better connectivity: Improved connections for Northern communities;
  • Increased service opportunities: Potential new routes to service more Northern destinations;
  • Existing service maintained: No reduction in flight options as a result of merger
  • Further enhanced safety: Will enable aircraft modernization across the network, as well as specialization in maintenance of Boeing 737 and ATR aircraft; and
  • Expanded charter business: Particularly related to Alberta natural resources and Northern charters, including for tourism.

As dedicated stewards of the Arctic environment, both Makivik and ICG are energized by the positive ecological impact the merged airline will have. The consolidation of duplicate, undercapacity flights, for example, will not only improve business efficiencies, but also significantly reduce GHG emissions and black carbon particulate along those routes.

A Lufthansa Consulting report commissioned by the Government of Nunavut supports the need for more efficiency in Nunavut air transportation services; the parties are confident the merger between First Air and Canadian North will meet these essential needs for all Northerners.

In the meantime, both First Air and Canadian North will continue providing Northerners with access to safe, friendly and reliable air travel services across the Arctic.

The First Air brand will be retired.

Top Copyright Photo: Canadian North Boeing 737-36N C-FGCN (msn 28590) YYZ (TMK Photography). Image: 928273.

Canadian North aircraft slide show:

First Air aircraft slide show:

Bottom Copyright Photo: First Air Boeing 737-406 Combi C-FFNE (msn 27233) YUL (Gilbert Hechema). Image: 942730.

Combi - Cargo up front

Route Maps:

Canadian North:

First Air:

 

First Air and Canadian North agree to merge

Canadian North Boeing 737-36N C-FKCN (msn 28573) YYC (Chris Sands). Image: 932428.

Makivik Corporation (Makivik) and the Inuvialuit Corporate Group (ICG) on July 6, 2018 announced they have signed an agreement in principle to merge First Air and Canadian North in order to provide the best possible essential air services across the Arctic. Makivik took this initiative to begin the discussion under the new direction of Charlie Watt, Sr.

Following execution of definitive agreements and the receipt of applicable regulatory approvals needed to establish a strong new entity, the proposed Pan-Arctic airline will operate under the name “Canadian North” and aircraft will feature new First Air livery, including its Inukshuk logo. Headquarters for the proposed airline will be located in Ottawa. Both Makivik and IDC recognize the value and potential in the North and in the Alberta market and remain committed to supporting and growing the Alberta presence. The parties expect to complete the merger by the end of 2018.

We expect this merger will:

  • Improve Arctic air services by offering customers greater reliability, better on-time service, and fewer interruptions;
  • Further enhance safety by enabling newer aircraft across the network, as well as specialization in maintenance of Boeing 737 and ATR aircraft;

  • Improve sustainability and efficiency of Arctic air services thus enabling us to more effectively meet demand across our vast service areas while addressing challenges related to pilot shortages; and
  • Contribute to Northern and Inuit economic development by creating a wholly Inuit-owned, new airline focused on Canada’s North.

Air service is not a luxury for Northerners; it is a vital lifeline which requires ongoing investment,” said Patrick Gruben, Chair of the Inuvialuit Development Corporation (IDC). “We are proud of Canadian North’s tremendous success while fulfilling its mandate to provide safe, stable air service to customers in Canada’s Northern regions and we look forward to further improving these services in partnership with Makivik Corporation.”

“The world is changing and we need to adapt to new realities,” said Charlie Watt Sr., Makivik President. “This is one way to assert our sovereignty across the Arctic.”

A report commissioned by the Government of Nunavut supports the need for more efficiency in Nunavut air transportation services; a merger of First Air and Canadian North is the only viable way to both meet and exceed these essential needs for Nunavummiut and all Northerners.

Customers of First Air and Canadian North will not see changes to services, including fares and scheduling, while we work toward achieving regulatory approval and finalizing the merger. Both parties are committed to keeping customers up-to-date on all developments related to scheduled and commercial flights on an ongoing basis.

By merging these airlines we look forward to new economic opportunities in Canada and Internationally, and to better air servies for Inuit across the circumpolar region.

In the meantime, both First Air and Canadian North will continue providing Northerners with access to safe, friendly and reliable air travel services across the Arctic.

Top Copyright Photo (all others by Canadian North and First Air): Canadian North Boeing 737-36N C-FKCN (msn 28573) YYC (Chris Sands). Image: 932428.

Canadian North aircraft slide show:

First Air aircraft slide show:

Below Copyright Photo: First Air Boeing 737-436 C-FFNM (msn 25839) YYZ (TMK Photography). Image: 942227.

First Air's 2017 new livery

Canadian North route map:

First Air route map: