Tag Archives: Boeing 777-FS2

FedEx Express orders 12 Boeing 767-300Fs and 12 777F freighters

FedEx Express Boeing 777-FS2 N892FD (msn 38707) NRT (Michael B. Ing). Image: 942466.

Boeing and FedEx Express today announced a new order for 12 Boeing 767-300 Freighters and 12 777F Freighters as the world’s largest air cargo carrier continues to invest in the industry’s most capable freighters to better serve its customers.

Image: Boeing.

The new airplanes, valued at $6.6 billion at list prices, will appear on Boeing’s Orders and Deliveries webpage once contingencies have been met.

This order comes as the air cargo industry continues to gather strength. A year after demand grew by nearly 10 percent, global air freight is on track to increase by another four to five percent in 2018.

Air cargo carriers are adding capacity to keep up with demand, either by converting passenger airplanes into freighters or ordering new production cargo jets. With the latest order from FedEx Express, Boeing has sold more than 50 widebody freighters so far in 2018.

FedEx Express and Boeing have a long-standing partnership. The express carrier is a major operator of the Boeing 757 Freighter and the largest operator of the 767 Freighter and 777 Freighter. FedEx is also a customer of Boeing’s Global Services business.

The 767 Freighter, based on the 767-300ER (extended range) passenger jet, can carry approximately 58 tons (52.7 tonnes) of revenue cargo with intercontinental range, making it a flexible platform for serving long-haul, regional or feeder markets.

The 777 Freighter is the world’s longest range twin-engine freighter. The jet can fly 4,900 nautical miles (9,070 kilometers) with a payload of 112 tons (102 metric tonnes or 102,000 kg). With the 777 Freighter, FedEx has been able to connect Asia with its hub in Memphis, Tenn. non-stop and reduce transit times by up to three hours. This has enabled FedEx to accept packages later in the day and still deliver them on time.

The 777 Freighter also uses 18 percent less fuel compared to the airplanes it replaces, and provides quieter takeoffs and landings that meet airport noise standards.

Copyright Photo: FedEx Express Boeing 777-FS2 N892FD (msn 38707) NRT (Michael B. Ing). Image: 942466.

FedEx Express aircraft slide show:

Boeing, FedEx Express are collaborating on the latest ecoDemonstrator Program testing

Boeing-FedEx "ecoDemonstrator Program"

On July 6, 2017 Boeing made this announcement. Now the program is ready to proceed with a dedicated freighter.

As part of the continuing effort to accelerate aerospace innovation, Boeing and FedEx Express, a subsidiary of FedEx Corporation and the world’s largest express transportation company, will work together to fly the next ecoDemonstrator.

Starting in 2018, a new Boeing 777 Freighter made for FedEx Express will test emerging technologies, such as propulsion advancements and flight deck innovations.

The ecoDemonstrator program, now in its fifth iteration, serves as a series of flying testbeds designed to improve the environmental performance and safety of future airplanes.

“The ecoDemonstrator program is focused on harvesting exciting new technologies that will benefit our airline customers, the flying public and the environment,” said Mike Sinnett, vice president of Boeing Commercial Airplanes Product Development.

The collaboration on the newest ecoDemonstrator project is the latest in a 38-year relationship between Boeing and FedEx.

“FedEx is committed to developing and implementing innovative solutions that connect the world responsibly and resourcefully,” said David Cunningham, president & CEO, FedEx Express. “We’re proud to work with Boeing and use our 777 Freighter to play a key role in bringing future benefits to the entire aviation industry.”

This round of ecoDemonstrator testing includes installing a compact thrust reverser developed by Boeing designed to save fuel, flight deck improvements that can improve efficient operations in and out of busy airports, and flying prototype airplane parts using cutting-edge manufacturing techniques that reduce material waste.

Flight testing is scheduled to last approximately three months before the airplane returns to the FedEx fleet.

Top Copyright Photo: FedEx Express Boeing 777-FS2 N878FD (msn 40684) (ecoDemonstrator Program) PAE (Nick Dean). Image: 939725.

Bottom Copyright Photo: FedEx Express Boeing 777-FS2 N878FD (msn 40684) (ecoDemonstrator Program) PAE (Nick Dean). Image: 939726.

Boeing-FedEx "ecoDemonstrator Program"

N885FD with “FedEx Panda Express” 2017 special markings transports Bao Bao to China

N885FD with "FedEx Panda Express" 2017 special markings transports Bao Bao to China

Bao Bao (BOW-BOW) the 3 ½ year-old giant panda began her journey to China on the morning on February 21, 2017. She departed the Smithsonian’s National Zoo at 11 a.m. for Dulles International Airport, where she boarded a FedEx Express Boeing 777F plane bound for Chengdu, China. The nonstop flight took about 16 hours. Bao Bao’s departure from the Zoo was broadcast via Facebook Live.

On the morning of February 21, 2017, the panda team arrived at 6:30 a.m. to finalize preparations for Bao Bao’s departure. Bao Bao received her morning diet of 17 pounds (8 kilograms) of bamboo and 5.4 (150 grams) leafeater biscuits and spent time in her outdoor habitat. Already acclimated from daily training, keeper Marty Dearie called Bao Bao back indoors and then into the custom travel crate at approximately 10 a.m. Zoo staff moved the crate onto a specially-decorated forklift which traveled carefully out of the David M. Rubenstein Giant Panda Habitat through the Zoo and was loaded on a FedEx Express truck. Dennis Kelly, director of the Zoo, was joined by Ambassador Cui Tiankai from the People’s Republic of China, Smithsonian Regent and Zoo giant panda conservation program supporter David Rubenstein and animal care staff to say goodbye.

In 2010, FedEx Express transported Bao Bao’s brother Tai Shan from The National Zoo to the China Conservation and Research Center in Chendgdu. FedEx Express also provided the transport for Bao Bao’s parents, Mei Xiang and Tian Tian, from China to the United States in 2000.

The specialized travel crate is made of steel and weighs approximately 800 lbs. Marty Dearie, one of the keepers who has cared for Bao Bao since her birth, and Katharine Hope, veterinarian at the Zoo will make the 8,600-mile trip with her. They continuously monitored Bao Bao during the trip and traveled with a supply of her favorite treats, including 50 pounds of bamboo, 2 pounds apples, 2 bags of leafeater biscuits, cooked sweet potatoes and water.

Upon arrival in Chengdu, Bao Bao’s new keepers from China Conservation and Research Center for the Giant Panda drove her to Dujiangyan Panda Base where she will stay in quarantine for approximately 30 days. The American team will follow, and Dearie will remain with Bao Bao for three days while she acclimates to her new home. It is not confirmed if Bao Bao will remain at Dujiangyan after the quarantine period has ended. Bao Bao will enter the giant panda breeding program when she reaches sexual maturity between 5 and 6 years old.

The panda team prepared Bao Bao for the move to make sure she is comfortable and safe during her journey. To slowly acclimate her to the travel crate, keepers asked Bao Bao to walk through it every day. After she became comfortable doing that, they got her used to spending short periods of time in it with the doors closed.

Bao Bao was born at 5:32 p.m. August 23, 2013, at the Zoo’s David M. Rubenstein Family Giant Panda Habitat. Her name translates to “precious” or “treasure” in Chinese. Both Mrs. Michelle Obama, former first lady of the United States, and Madame Peng Liyuan, first lady of China sent congratulatory messages for her naming ceremony when she was 100 days old. At her first birthday zhuazhou (dra-JO) ceremony, she selected a banner depicting peaches, representing longevity. She is the second surviving cub of her parents Mei Xiang (may-SHONG) and Tian Tian (tee-YEN tee-YEN).

Giant pandas are listed as “vulnerable” in the wild by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. There are an estimated 1,800 in the wild. The Smithsonian’s National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute is a leader in giant panda conservation. Ever since these charismatic bears arrived at the Zoo in 1972, animal care staff and scientists have studied giant panda biology, behavior, breeding, reproduction, and disease. These experts are also leading ecology studies in giant panda’s native habitat. The Zoo’s giant panda team works closely with colleagues in China to advance conservation efforts around the world. Chinese scientists are working to reintroduce giant pandas to the wild.

Copyright Photo: FedEx Express Boeing 777-FS2 N885FD (msn 41064) (FedEx Panda Express 2017) IAD (Brian McDonough). Image: 936065.

 

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