Tag Archives: G-VROC

Virgin Atlantic to retire its last Boeing 747-400 in 2021

Virgin Atlantic Airways Boeing 747-41R G-VROC (msn 32746)  LHR (SPA). Image: 924415.

While Virgin Atlantic Airways unveiled its new cabins for the new Airbus A350-1000s, it also confirmed the delivery schedule for its remaining eight 455-seat Boeing 747-400s.

Virgin Atlantic CEO Shai Weiss stated Virgin Atlantic would soon begin to retire its Boeing 747-400s this year. By 2021, all eight remaining 747s will be retired and replaced with the new Airbus A350-1000s.

Top Copyright Photo (all others by the airline): Virgin Atlantic Airways Boeing 747-41R G-VROC (msn 32746) LHR (SPA). Image: 924415.

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Virgin Atlantic moves the last Boeing 747-400 flight at London Heathrow to February

Virgin Atlantic Airways (London), as previously reported, is phasing out its venerable Boeing 747-400 at London’s Heathrow Airport (LHR). According to an update by Airline Route, the last Boeing 747-400 arrival at LHR is now scheduled for February 21, 2016 instead of April 17, 2016.

The last flight is expected to be flight VS006 from Miami to LHR arriving on the morning of February 21.

The type will continue to be operated from London’s Gatwick Airport.

Copyright Photo: SPA/AirlinersGallery.com. Boeing 747-41R G-VROC (msn 32746) climbs away from London’s Heathrow Airport.

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Virgin Atlantic Airways sees 10% revenue growth in its first 1Q

Virgin Atlantic Airways (London) is reporting a 10 percent revenue growth in its fiscal first quarter.

Read the press release:

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Copyright Photo: Nik French. The first aircraft in the “new paint” color scheme is Boeing 747-41R G-VROC (msn 32746) seen on the ramp at Manchester.

Virgin Atlantic Airways introduces a new livery

Copyright Photo: Nik French.

Virgin Atlantic Airways (London) this morning (July 25) rolled out a new on Boeing 747-41R G-VROC (msn 32746) at Air Livery at Manchester. The revised scheme has taken the rather drab 2006 color scheme and added large lower case billboard titles.

On July 29 Virgin Atlantic officially unveiled the new aircraft livery and brand identity for the airline. As the press release states, “the new design, which will be applied to all of the company’s 38 aircraft, signage, communications and advertising was showcased on one of Virgin Atlantic’s Boeing 747-400 aircraft G-VROC.

The Virgin Atlantic name, previously on the front end of the fuselage is now emblazoned large across the whole of the aircraft in a fine custom drawn font. In addition, the undercarriage of the aircraft now features the new Virgin Atlantic logo in dark purple – making the aircraft more easily identifiable when taking off and landing. The winglets are now red with the Virgin script on the inner side, visible to passengers on board the plane.

The new livery uses an entirely new paint system which is unique to Virgin Atlantic – a first on commercial aircraft. It has been specially developed to achieve a highly reflective depth of metallic color.

The painting process has been simplified, using fewer maskings and applications for a drastic reduction in materials used. Over 450 liters of paint was used and took over 3,000 – 3,500 man hours to paint. The new paint is more durable so aircraft will only require re- painting once a decade.

The iconic, flag carrying flying lady, who appears on all Virgin Atlantic aircraft, has been rejuvenated with a subtle cosmetic makeover and enhanced detailing – now fluttering a larger Union Jack.

London brand agency Circus was commissioned in 2008 to review and refine the Virgin Atlantic brand values. The new livery and logo were developed by award winning design consultancy, Johnson Banks, in collaboration with the in-house brand design team, led by Joe Ferry and Nina Jenkins, and was created using the brand values defined by Circus.”

Copyright Photo: Nik French. Boeing 747-41R G-VROC (msn 32746) is pictured at MAN after the roll out.