Tag Archives: Boeing 737 MAX 8

International Airlines Group announces intent to buy 200 Boeing 737 MAX airplanes

Boeing has made this announcement:

One of the world’s largest airline groups announced today it plans to build its future fleet with the Boeing 737 MAX with an intention to purchase 200 MAX jets.

International Airlines Group (IAG) and Boeing said the two companies have been in discussions regarding the opportunity and signed a letter of intent at the Paris Air Show in a deal that would be valued at more than $24 billion, per list prices.

IAG is the parent company of Aer Lingus, British Airways, Iberia, Vueling and Level that fly more than 113 million passengers a year combined. The group has been a long-time operator of Boeing twin-aisle airplanes.

 

Earlier this year, IAG group committed to and finalized a major order for Boeing’s newest long-haul model, the 777X, to complement its fleet of current-generation 777s and new 787 Dreamliners. In the single-aisle segment, IAG and its affiliates used to operate Classic 737 aircraft. Today, its fleet is almost exclusively Airbus A320 family aircraft. IAG CEO Willie Walsh has said the group would consider the 737 MAX as part of diversifying its future fleet to spur competition.

In selecting the 737 MAX, IAG says it will fly a combination of the 737 MAX 8, which seats up to 178 passengers in a two-class configuration, and the larger 737 MAX 10 jet, which can accommodate as many as 230 passengers. The airline did not disclose a specific split between the two MAX models, though it anticipates deploying the aircraft at a number of the group’s airlines including Vueling and Level.

When a final agreement is reached, it will be posted to Boeing’s Orders & Deliveries website.

IAG is one of the world’s largest airline groups with 582 aircraft flying to 268 destinations, carrying 113 million passengers in 2018.

In addition, IAG issued this statement:

International Airlines Group (IAG) has signed a letter of intent with Boeing for 200 Boeing 737 aircraft to join its fleet. The LOI is subject to formal agreement.

The mix of 737-8 and 737-10 aircraft would be delivered between 2023 and 2027 and would be powered by CFM Leap engines. It is anticipated that the aircraft would be used by a number of the Group’s airlines including Vueling, Level plus British Airways at London Gatwick Airport.

Willie Walsh, IAG chief executive, said: “We’re very pleased to sign this letter of intent with Boeing and are certain that these aircraft will be a great addition to IAG’s shorthaul fleet.

“We have every confidence in Boeing and expect that the aircraft will make a successful return to service in the coming months having received approval from the regulators”.

 

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Southwest Airlines extends the grounding of the Boeing 737 MAX

Southwest Airlines has issued this updated statement on its Boeing 737 MAX fleet:

In compliance with the Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA) order on March 13, 2019, our Boeing 737 MAX 8 aircraft remain temporarily grounded.

Southwest Airlines continues to await guidance from Boeing and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) on the impending 737 MAX software enhancements and training requirements. We are encouraged by the reported progress and proposed path forward for returning the aircraft to service, and we remain confident that, once certified by the FAA, the enhancements will support the safe operation of the MAX.

In April, we revised our flight schedule by removing the MAX through August 5 to offer reliability to our operation and stability for our Customers during the busy summer travel months. With the timing of the MAX’s return-to-service still uncertain, we are again revising our plans to remove the MAX from our schedule through September 2.

By proactively removing the MAX from scheduled service, we can reduce last-minute flight cancellations and unexpected disruptions to our Customers’ travel plans. We will proactively contact all Customers whose itineraries will be impacted by the revision to offer them maximum flexibility and re-accommodate them well in advance of their travel date. The revision will proactively remove roughly 100 daily flights from our schedule out of our total peak-day schedule of more than 4,000 daily flights.

NBC: Ethiopian Airlines is not sure it will fly the Boeing 737 MAX again

NBC Nightly News with Lester Holt has made this announcement for a segment to air tonight:

The CEO of Ethiopian Airlines, Tewolde Gebremariam, tells NBC News in an exclusive interview that he is not sure his airline will ever fly the 737 MAX again, saying: “If we fly them again, we’ll be the last airline to fly them again.”  He added, “At this stage, I cannot fully say that the airplane will fly back on Ethiopian Airlines. It may if we are fully convinced and if we are able to convince our pilots, if we are ever to convince our traveling public.”

He continued, “Because, you know, other airlines have grounded the airplane, but in our case beyond grounding the airplane, we had this tragic accident just a couple of months ago. So it takes a lot of efforts to convince everybody that the airplane is safe. But beyond that, I think we have to convince ourselves and we want to do that.”

Ethiopian Airlines CEO wants rigorous review of Boeing 737-MAX planes following fatal crash

By Tom Costello

 

Two months after Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 crashed, killing all 157 people on board, the CEO of the airline said his crews and passengers have lost confidence in the Boeing 737-MAX and he wants the company to conduct a more thorough review of the plane.

 

In an exclusive interview with NBC News on Monday, Tewolde Gebremariam said that the airline doesn’t yet know if it will fly the Boeing 737-MAX planes again. But he said, “At this stage I cannot, I cannot fully say that the airplane will fly back on Ethiopian Airlines. It may, if we are fully convinced and if we are able to convince our pilots, if we are ever to convince our traveling public.”

 

However, he also said that if the planes were back in service, Ethiopian Airlines would be “the last airline to fly them again.” “We have not got a time to discuss on the return to service and we have made it very clear on several occasions we would not be the first one to return their airplane back to air.”

 

Gebremariam said it’s not enough for Boeing to only review the “MCAS” anti-stall system believed responsible for the fatal crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia. He wants a much more rigorous review of the plane.

 

“We strongly believe that entire flight control system needs to be reviewed,” he said.

 

The Ethiopian Airlines crash on March 10 followed a Lion Air crash in Indonesia last October. The two crashes were responsible for 346 deaths.

 

Investigators in both countries say the Boeing 737-MAX’s new MCAS anti-stall system seems to have played a role.

 

“It’s very abnormal for a new airplane to have two accidents, fatal accidents in a span of five months,” he said. “These are brand new airplanes.”

 

Boeing has admitted that “MCAS” misfired, putting both the Indonesian and Ethiopian planes into a fatal nose dive. The company is expected to submit its software fix for Federal Aviation Administration approval later this month.

 

But investigators have also noted the Ethiopian pilots were flying much faster than is typical, more than 500 miles per hour.

 

Still, Gebremariam insisted the pilots did everything they could to save their plane.

 

“They have followed the procedures correctly,” he said. “This should not happen again to any airline, even a single life should not be put at risk.”

 

Boeing said in a statement, “Boeing is working closely with pilots, airlines and global regulators to update the max and help prevent this tragic loss of life from happening again.”

 

Gebremariam said the airline’s relationship with Boeing goes back more than 60 years, and he has confidence in Boeing, even if his crews have lost confidence in the 737-MAX.

 

“We still have very strong confidence in Boeing, but we want them to do the right thing without rushing to make sure this airplane is safe and clear confidence in all of us before it returns back to air.”

Boeing agrees to ground all 371 737 MAX aircraft worldwide

Boeing issued this statement:

Boeing continues to have full confidence in the safety of the 737 MAX.  However, after consultation with the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB), and aviation authorities and its customers around the world, Boeing has determined — out of an abundance of caution and in order to reassure the flying public of the aircraft’s safety — to recommend to the FAA the temporary suspension of operations of the entire global fleet of 371 737 MAX aircraft.

“On behalf of the entire Boeing team, we extend our deepest sympathies to the families and loved ones of those who have lost their lives in these two tragic accidents,” said Dennis Muilenburg, president, CEO, Chairman of The Boeing Company.

“We are supporting this proactive step out of an abundance of caution. Safety is a core value at Boeing for as long as we have been building airplanes; and it always will be. There is no greater priority for our company and our industry. We are doing everything we can to understand the cause of the accidents in partnership with the investigators, deploy safety enhancements and help ensure this does not happen again.”

Boeing makes this recommendation and supports the decision by the FAA.

Video: New York Times:

Boeing delivers the first 737 MAX 8 to flydubai

Boeing and flydubai on July 31, 2017 celebrated the delivery of the airline’s first 737 MAX 8, making the Middle East carrier the first in the region to operate Boeing’s newest single-aisle airplane.

This delivery is the first of 76 737 MAX airplanes the airline will be adding to their all-Boeing fleet of Next-Generation 737s.

Flydubai currently operates a fleet of 58 Next-Generation 737-800s and has built a network of more than 95 destinations in 44 countries, from Russia in the north, Czech Republic in the west, Thailand in the east and Tanzania in the south.

Photo: Boeing. The pictured Boeing 737 MAX 8 temporarily registered as N60436 (msn 60966) became A6-MAX on the handover.

Route Map:

Norwegian becomes the first European Boeing 737 MAX 8 operator

Norwegian and Boeing on June 29, 2017 celebrated the delivery of the Norwegian’s first two 737 MAX 8s. Norwegian is the first European carrier to take delivery of the 737 MAX and will deploy the airplanes on transatlantic flights between northern Europe and the east coast of the United States.

Norwegian is the sixth largest low-cost carrier in the world and flies over 500 routes to more than 150 destinations in Europe, North Africa, the Middle East, Thailand, the Caribbean and the US. It currently operates a fleet of more than 100 Next-Generation 737-800s and over a dozen 787-8 and 787-9 Dreamliners. The Oslo-headquartered carrier also has unfilled orders for 108 737 MAX 8s and 19 787-9s.

Copyright Photo: Joe G. Walker. Boeing 737 MAX 8 EI-FYA (msn 42830).

Mauritania Airlines orders one Boeing 737 MAX 8

Mauritania Airlines on June 21, 2017 announced an order for one Boeing 737 MAX 8 airplane at the 2017 Paris Air Show. The order, valued at $112.4 million at list prices, was previously attributed to an unidentified customer on the Boeing Orders & Deliveries website.

Based in Mauritania’s capital city Nouakchott, at Nouakchott-Oumtounsy International Airport, Mauritania Airlines was founded in 2010 and currently serves more than 10 destinations across Africa and Europe. The Mauritanian flag-carrier currently operates a fleet which includes one Next-Generation 737-800, one Next Generation 737-700 and two 737-500s.

Image: Boeing.