Tag Archives: 737-838

QANTAS celebrates 95 years of history and unveils a “Retro Roo II” Boeing 737-800

"Retro Roo II" in the 1959 Boeing 707 livery

QANTAS Airways has made this announcement:

QANTAS logo (large)

A newly reconfigured Qantas Boeing 737-800 painted in vintage 1960s livery has been unveiled in Sydney as the national carrier celebrates 95 years of flying.

Retro Roo II (VH-VXQ) has the same livery that featured on Qantas’ Boeing 707 jets from 1959 to 1961 – when the flying kangaroo helped revolutionise long-haul travel.

The Boeing 707 represented a step-change in aviation and Qantas was the first carrier outside the United States to operate the jet. In 1959, Qantas used it to become the first airline to operate regular passenger jet services across the Pacific Ocean, connecting Sydney and San Francisco.

Qantas was also the first airline to offer a round-the-world jet service with the Boeing 707. The flying time was 70 hours compared to 127 hours with the Super Constellation aircraft that the B707 replaced. Today a Qantas flight from Sydney to London stops just once, in Dubai, and takes 21 flying hours.

Welcoming the freshly-painted jet into a hangar with more than 300 employees, Qantas Group CEO Alan Joyce described the vintage livery as a flying tribute to the airline’s history of innovation.

QANTAS 737-800 VH-VXQ (59)(Ldg) SYD (QANTAS)(LRW)

Above Photo: QANTAS. Boeing 737-838 VH-VXQ (msn 33723) arrives at the Sydney base.

“None of the past 95 years would have been possible without all those who have worked for Qantas with such commitment and passion. Tens of thousands of people have dedicated their whole careers to the national carrier and many who work here today are the third or fourth generation in their family to do so,” he added.

“As we celebrate our 95th birthday today, I hope this livery inspires a sense of pride in what our national airline has achieved during all those years of taking Australians around the world and bringing them safely home again,” said Mr Joyce.

“A large part of the national pride people feel towards the flying kangaroo comes from the fact it has been responsible for so many innovations in global aviation.

“We were the first airline to introduce business class, we have operated record breaking endurance flights throughout our history and we’ve helped pioneer many breakthroughs in aviation technology.

“Innovation is still at the core of Qantas and we’re now looking to a new generation of aircraft with the arrival of Qantas’ first B787 Dreamliners in 2017. Like the 707 in 1959, these aircraft are at the cutting edge of aviation and we’re really excited about the opportunities they’ll open up for our customers.

The arrival of Retro Roo II, which was painted in Townsville, is part of Qantas’ 95th birthday celebrations. Events so far have included an Australia-wide Instameet and Qantas’ charity flight to Longreach, which raised over $110,000 for drought relief. A gala dinner for over 1,000 people in the airline’s A380 hangar in Mascot on Friday rounds out the activities.

Retro Roo II is the second Qantas 737 aircraft in vintage livery. Retro Roo I was launched last November, featuring the livery of 1971-1984, and regularly appears on social media as passengers photograph it at airports across the country.

Earlier this year, Qantas donated its record-breaking Boeing 747-400 (VH-OJA) to an aviation museum staffed largely by former Qantas employees. The aircraft was significant for operating the world’s longest non-stop flight from London to Sydney in 1989, and is now a big tourism draw for the Illawarra region.

Copyright Photo: Rob Finlayson/AirlinersGallery.com (all others by QANTAS). Boeing 737-838 VH-VXQ (msn 33723) named “Retro Roo II” is pictured at Sydney after arriving from Townsville.

QANTAS aircraft slide show: AG Airline Slide Show

Video: QANTAS Airways. The first Boeing 707 service to San Francisco.

QANTAS Airways restores the Perth-Singapore route

QANTAS Airways (Sydney) today (June 26) restored the Perth-Singapore route.

Flight QF71 departed this afternoon from Perth bound for Singapore, one of five return services that QANTAS will operate each week with its Boeing 737-800 aircraft. With a flying time of just over 5 hours, the flight is scheduled to land at 5.20 pm.

In other news, The QANTAS Group issued this statement concerning the rejection of the Jetstar Hong Kong application:

QANTAS logo (large)

The QANTAS Group will work with its fellow shareholders in Jetstar Hong Kong to review the enterprise, following the Air Transport Licensing Authority’s decision to reject the local carrier’s application to establish an operation in Hong Kong.

Jetstar logo (large)

Jetstar Hong Kong – a joint venture between Shun Tak Holdings Limited, China Eastern Airlines and the QANTAS Group – was announced in March 2012. Each partner holds a one-third economic share while the Hong Kong based Shun Tak Holdings has 51 per cent of the voting rights and ultimate control. Seventy percent of the board is from Hong Kong.

At December 31, 2014, the QANTAS Group investment in Jetstar Hong Kong was carried at $10 million.

The low cost carrier’s application for a licence to operate scheduled air services has been under consideration by the local licensing authority for over two years.

Expressing disappointment at the decision, CEO of the QANTAS Group Alan Joyce said: “This is as disappointing for the shareholders as it is for the travellers that Jetstar Hong Kong planned to serve.

“It’s the travelling public who have lost out, because the message from this decision is that Hong Kong appears closed to fresh aviation investment even when it is majority locally owned and controlled.

“At a time when aviation markets across Asia are opening up, Hong Kong is going in the opposite direction. Given the importance of aviation to global commerce, shutting the door to new competition can only serve the vested interests already installed in that market.”

Copyright Photo: Steve Bailey/AirlinersGallery.com. “RetroRoo”, the pictured Boeing 737-838 VH-XZP (msn 44577) in the retro 1971 livery, reopened the route.

QANTAS aircraft slide show: AG Airline Slide Show

AG No Registering

 

QANTAS Airways’ “RetroRoo” arrives in Sydney

QANTAS Airways (Sydney) released this statement about its first retrojet “RetroRoo” arriving in Sydney:

The newest addition to the QANTAS Airways fleet has touched down on Australian soil, proudly carrying a retro livery and bearing the name of trailblazing former CEO James Strong.

The design is a flashback to the livery that adorned QANTAS Boeing 747s in the 1970s and is a flying tribute to mark seven decades of the Flying Kangaroo logo, which falls this month.

QANTAS Airways CEO Alan Joyce joined past and present staff and executives, Boeing executives and other guests to welcome the aircraft after it was given a water cannon salute from Air Services Australia.

The aircraft is named after former CEO James Strong. James was instrumental in the making of the modern QANTAS, including the merger with Australian Airlines.

James Strong was QANTAS CEO from 1993 to 2001 and later served on the QANTAS Board until his death in March 2013. His wife Jeanne-Claude and son Nicholas were at the hangar to christen the aircraft.

“QANTAS aircraft are traditionally named after Australian places, with the exception of our fleet of Airbus A380s, which are named for Australian aviation pioneers. We’re very proud to break with tradition to name this aircraft James Strong – another great leader of the Australian aviation industry.”

The new Boeing 737-800, the 75th of the aircraft type, will begin services across the QANTAS domestic network from next week. It is the 11th new Boeing aircraft that the QANTAS Group has taken delivery of this year.

The delivery of the “retrojet” coincides with the week of QANTAS’ 94th birthday, which was celebrated on Sunday November 16. The Queensland and Northern Territory Aerial Services Limited (QANTAS) was registered as a business on November 16, 1920.

Update: VH-XZP entered revenue service on November 22, operating flight QF 611 from Brisbane to Melbourne according to Australian Aviation.

Copyright Photo: Rob Finlayson/AirlinersGallery.com. Boeing 737-838 VH-XZP (msn 44577) “James Strong” (now with a bowtie) sits proudly on the Sydney ramp.

Video:

QANAS aircraft slide show: AG Slide Show

QANTAS Airways introduces its first retrojet

QANTAS 737-800 VH-XZP (71) + John Travolta (QANTAS)(LRW)

QANTAS Airways (Sydney) has formally introduced its first retrojet in the form of its newly delivered Boeing 737-838 VH-XZP (msn 44577) painted in the retro 1971 ochre livery.

The company issued this statement and photo:

QANTAS has gone back to the future by unveiling its first ever “retro” inspired livery on one of its brand new Boeing 737 aircraft.

The eye catching design is a flying tribute to 70 years of the iconic flying kangaroo logo – a widely recognized symbol of home to millions of intrepid Australian travellers.

QANTAS Ambassador and self-confessed aviation enthusiast, John Travolta (above) was on hand to witness QANTAS and Boeing unveil the aircraft at a special hangar event in Seattle, which is timed to mark the 70th anniversary of the kangaroo logo.

QANTAS ambassador, John Travolta said the retro livery has brought back lots of memories for him.

“It’s great to see a piece of QANTAS history flying in the sky today,” said Mr Travolta.

“I have enjoyed many wonderful experiences with QANTAS over the years, from getting my 747 wings to having my own 707 painted in the original 1960s QANTAS livery. This is a great celebration of the brand’s heritage and incredible reputation over the years.

The signature element of the 1971-1984 livery design was the ochre band around the window line of the aircraft. Ochre reflected the colors of the outback where QANTAS was established in 1920.

The winged kangaroo logo is used on the tail and was adapted from the original 1947 version designed by Gert Sellheim.

In 1984 the flying kangaroo discarded its wings, evolving to its current slender and stylized form.

The 737 will operate across all QANTAS domestic routes from November 20, acting as a flying reminder of where QANTAS has come from, as well as showing new generations of young Australians some of the history behind Australia’s biggest airline.

The livery is also timed to mark the QANTAS’ 94th birthday, which also falls in November.

Happy Birthday QANTAS.

Photos: QANTAS Airways.

QANTAS Airways aircraft slide show:

Kangaroo Logo evolution:

QANTAS historic logos

QANTAS 737-800 WL VH-XZP (71)(Tail)(QANTAS)(LRW)

QANTAS Airways will retire its last Boeing 767 on December 27, awaits the delivery of its new 1970 Boeing 737-800 retro jet

QANTAS Airways (Sydney) is awaiting delivery of its new Boeing 737-838 VH-XZP (msn 44577) which has been painted in a retro livery. The 1970 retro livery will be formally unveiled on November 16. VH-XZP is the company’s 75th Boeing 737-800. The 737 is scheduled to depart from the Seattle area on November 17 on delivery and will arrive on November 19 in Australia.

In other news, QANTAS has unveiled a new brand advertising campaign, based on a concept of what the national carrier has been doing for almost 100 years – bringing people home.

QANTAS celebrates its 94th year of operation this month. In the same month, QANTAS will also celebrate the 70th year of the QANTAS kangaroo logo.

The ‘Feels Like Home’ series tells the real stories of five QANTAS passengers and their journey home to Australia being welcomed at the airport by loved ones.

Filmed in London, Santiago, Los Angeles, Hong Kong, the Pilbara and Sydney, the series features QANTAS employees as well as customers and rolled out from Sunday November 9.

QANTAS Group CEO Alan Joyce said the campaign was designed to celebrate the unique place Qantas has in the lives of many Australians.

Finally, QANTAS Airways will operate its last Boeing 767-300 flight on December 27, 2014 from Melbourne as flight QF 452 per Airline Route.

Copyright Photo: Keith Burton/AirlinersGallery.com. Boeing 767-338 ER VH-OGQ (msn 28154) climbs away from the Sydney hub.

QANTAS Aircraft Slide Show: AG Slide Show

Video: As mentioned above, QANTAS is phasing out its aging Boeing 767-300s. Follow one 767 to Victorville, California for storage and final disposition:

 

QANTAS’ passengers will be able to use personal electronic devices starting tomorrow

QANTAS Airways (Sydney) today issued this statement:

From tomorrow afternoon QANTAS customers will be able to use their personal electronic devices such as smart phones, tablets and music players in flight mode, for the duration of each flight, providing uninterrupted access to work and entertainment.

QANTAS was approved to revise its personal electronic device policy by the Civil Aviation Safety Authority today following new guidance on the safe use of personal electronic devices inflight.

Advice for customers:

Devices can be used whether passengers are boarding via aerobridge or transiting across tarmac.

Once aircraft doors are closed for departure, devices will need to be in ‘flight mode’.

Customers are required to secure handheld devices by holding them or placing them in a seat pocket during taxi, take-off and landing. Larger items such as laptops will still need to be stowed.

Customers are still required to listen to all inflight safety briefings and comply with cabin crew instructions.

Mobile and smart phones will still not be able to be used to make calls or send texts from the air.

QANTAS plans to lift restrictions on electronic devices across the entire QANTAS Group for regional, domestic and international flights.

QANTAS Link and Jetstar Airways are in the final stages of preparing their submission to CASA for the extended use of personal electronic devices.

The changes to CASA’s ruling on personal electronic devices inflight follows an announcement by the United States’ Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) in October last year that it would allow passengers to leave their electronic devices on through all phases of flight if individual airlines could prove that it did not interfere with the operation of the aircraft.

Experts from airlines, aircraft manufacturers, passenger groups, pilot associations, flight attendants, and mobile services have since been investigating the impact of personal electronic devices inflight.

Until today, devices in Australia were required to remain off until the seatbelt sign turned off, meaning passengers were unable to use them while the aircraft was taxiing to the runway or through much of the climb or descent.

In addition, QANTAS is working towards enabling customers to use their own devices to access 350 hours of on-demand entertainment from gate to gate on selected Domestic and International aircraft. Initially this functionality would encompass Apple devices including iPads and iPhones, followed by laptops and Android devices at a later stage.

Customers would only need to download a Q Streaming app to their device, or connect via their browser to the Q Streaming Inflight Entertainment network to access movies, TV shows and music. Qantas will continue to offer complimentary tablets for customers to access Q Streaming on a number of aircraft types.

The new policy will apply to all QANTAS Domestic and QANTAS International flights from 3:00pm tomorrow (August 26).

Copyright Photo: Michael B. Ing/AirlinersGallery.com. Boeing 737-838 VH-VXS (msn 33725) prepares to taxi from the gate at Denpasar on the island of Bali, Indonesia.

QANTAS Airways: AG Slide Show

QANTAS Airways to refurbish its Boeing 737-800 fleet

QANTAS Airways (Sydney) will refurbish its fleet of 67 Boeing 737-800 aircraft, providing customers with a greater level of comfort and enhanced in-flight entertainment options.

The upgrade will commence in mid-2015 and be completed within 12 months.

According to the airline, “29 of our latest 737-800 aircraft already have full seat back video on demand in-flight entertainment for each passenger, the refurbishment will see wireless Q-streaming entertainment installed on the 38 remaining 737-800 aircraft to supplement the screens that fold down from the ceiling.”

QANTAS has 67 Boeing 737-800s in its domestic fleet, and will receive four new aircraft by December. Earlier this year the last of the older Boeing 737-400s was retired. The average age of the QF Boeing 737-800’s is 6.7 years.

The installation of QStreaming on the Boeing 737s is part of a broader overhaul of QANTAS’ in-flight entertainment offering, including 100 more hours of content per month, and the introduction of Sky News, Foxtel and Fox Sports for inflight news and additional programming.

Copyright Photo: Joe G. Walker/AirlinersGallery.com. Boeing 737-838 VH-VZL (msn 34194) was delivered on April 22, 2011.

QANTAS Airways: AG Slide Show

QANTAS Airways responds to untrue claims against the carrier

QANTAS Airways (Sydney) has issued this “Questions and Answers” statement concerning industry rumors about the carrier:

CLAIM: Qantas aircraft are less safe when serviced at overseas heavy maintenance facilities.

FACT: This is not true. The aviation industry is one of the most highly regulated industries in the world. All maintenance on Australian aircraft needs to be conducted at facilities approved by Australia’s aviation safety regulator, CASA.

The union’s claims are actually more than 10 years old. They have already been investigated by Qantas and CASA, and the facilities continue to be approved by CASA and used by the world’s leading airlines.

This particular union has repeatedly played the safety card against Qantas and was found in the Federal Court to be using safety claims to pursue industrial issues.

The majority of Qantas’ maintenance is done in Australia. Our A380s and B747s have their heavy maintenance conducted overseas at world-class heavy maintenance facilities. Regardless of geography, all our maintenance is done at facilities approved by CASA and to Qantas’ high standards.

As with all elements of aviation, there are multiple fail-safes to account for the very small amount of human error that may occur – so suggesting any mistake is a potential catastrophe is alarmist and disingenuous.

CLAIM: Qantas does not have oversight of the maintenance conducted at overseas facilities.

FACT: Qantas sends teams of employees from our Engineering division to oversee heavy maintenance conducted outside of Australia, including senior managers and support staff. The senior manager is often an experienced Licenced Aircraft Maintenance Engineer.

All maintenance on Qantas aircraft that is conducted at overseas facilities is done to Qantas’ high standards and at facilities approved by CASA.

CLAIM: The safety of a Qantas Aircraft was jeopardised by maintenance conducted in Hong Kong in 2008 with engine the engine not bolted on correctly.

FACT: Qantas disputes the union’s interpretation of this incident and categorically rejects suggestions that the safety of the aircraft was at risk as a result of what was a minor maintenance issue.

Firstly the issues relate to washers – not bolts. One engine had three of the eight washers installed upside down. Two engines had one washer installed instead of two on the bolts. (Note – Boeing recommends only one washer to be used.)

While this was not in strictly keeping with Qantas maintenance manual, it had no bearing on the safety of the aircraft at all. This was looked at by CASA at the time and found no need to investigate further.

The claim that the engines could have fallen off the aircraft during the flight as a consequence is false and alarmist.

CLAIM: Qantas executives have enjoyed massive pay increases, taking executive packages to a ratio of 140:1 to Qantas worker’s wages.

FACT: Qantas executives have not had ‘massive pay increases’. In fact, executive pay has decreased since 2010. Alan Joyce will take home 36 per cent less this year compared to last year and there is currently a bonus and pay freeze in place for executives and all employees. The Qantas Board has also taken a reduction in fees.

Qantas is not aware how the union came up with the 140:1 ratio, however it is incorrect.

CLAIM: Half of Qantas workers earn less than $50,000 a year.

FACT: The claim that half of Qantas employees earn less than $50,000 a year is completely false. Less than 10 per cent of Qantas employees earn less than $50,000 and this includes both full time and part time employees. The majority of part time workers also earn more than $50,000 a year.

CLAIM: Hangar 245 in Sydney was vacated in 2006 and has been empty ever since.

FACT: This is not true. We have invested millions of dollars upgrading the hangar and it is currently being used by our line maintenance engineers.

Copyright Photo: John Adlard/AirlinersGallery.com. Boeing 737-838 VH-XZJ (msn 39365) in the Mendoowoorrji special livery taxies at the Sydney hub.

QANTAS Airways: AG Slide Show

QANTAS’ 75th 737 arrives in New Zealand

Boeing 737-838 VH-VZF (msn 34200) arrives at Melbourne on September 3 with the special 75th logo.  It was later re-registered ZK-ZQA for the journey to New Zealand.  Copyright Photo: Gordon Reid via John Adlard.

Boeing 737-838 VH-VZF (msn 34200) arrives at Melbourne on September 3 with the special 75th logo. It was later re-registered ZK-ZQA for the journey to New Zealand. Copyright Photo: Gordon Reid via John Adlard.

QANTAS Airways’ (Sydney) 75th Boeing 737 arrived yesterday (September 21) at Auckland with a special decal. Boeing 737-838 ZK-ZQA (msn 34200, ex VH-VZF) is also named for New Zealand aviator Jean Batten and will be operated by subsidiary JetConnect on trans-Tasman services.

Press release:

finance.yahoo.com/news/Qantas-takes-75th-Boeing-prnews-3696035945.html?x=0&.v=1