Tag Archives: APA

Allied Pilots Association: “Time for Gulf Carriers to Open the Books” (vote in the poll)

Allied Pilots Association logo

Allied Pilots Association (APA), representing the 15,000 pilots of American Airlines and US Airways, has issued this statement as the verbal war between western, mainly U.S. carriers and the fast-growing Big Three Gulf carriers (Emirates, Etihad Airways and Qatar Airways) intensifies. Interestingly American Airlines and Qatar Airways are Oneworld Alliance partners. Here is the statement:

Allied Pilots Association President Capt. Keith Wilson issued the following statement as the chief executive officers of Qatar Airways, Etihad Airways and Emirates Airline gather in Washington, D.C. this week:

“The massive government subsidies that have flowed to these Gulf carriers have tilted the playing field, posing a serious threat to U.S. jobs and the long-term viability of our nation’s airline industry. Government subsidies have enabled Gulf carriers to dump product into the marketplace irrespective of demand or profit-and-loss considerations. It’s time for Gulf carriers to open the books.

“The U.S. airline industry represents a vital national asset — one that generates hundreds of thousands of middle-class jobs and indirectly supports many more. We deserve a level playing field.

“Full and equal compliance with Open Skies agreements is the responsibility of all participating parties.”

What do you think?

Advertisements

Allied Pilots Association union agrees to put the latest AAG contract offer to a ratification vote

Allied Pilots Association-APA (Dallas/Fort Worth), representing the 10,000 pilots of American Airlines (Dallas/Fort Worth) and 5,000 pilots US Airways (Phoenix), agreed late Saturday (January 3) to put the latest offer from the American Airlines Group (Dallas/Fort Worth) to a ratification vote. The AAG was threatening to pull the offer. The AAG is not offering a profit sharing program unlike the pilots at Delta.

According to the Wall Street Journal (WSJ), “the company is offering the pilots a more than 18% pay increase retroactive to December 2, 2014 plus a 4% boost that it announced late last month for most nonunion employees and any unions that reach joint postmerger contracts. Moreover, the pilots are in line to receive an additional 3% raise retroactive to the start of 2015, the first of four annual pay increases.”

Read the full report: CLICK HERE

Copyright Photo: Ton Jochems/AirlinersGallery.com. American Airlines Boeing 737-823 N831NN (msn 33211) taxies at the O’Hare International Airport hub in Chicago.

American Airlines aircraft slide show (current livery): AG Slide Show

American Airlines management and Allied Pilots Association search for agreement on a new contract

American Airlines (Dallas/Fort Worth) has offered its pilots, represented by the Allied Pilots Association, a reported “industry leading contract” according to Terry Maxon of the Dallas News. The two negotiation groups are facing a deadline of Saturday to resolve their outstanding issues with a new tentative agreement. The two parties started talking on July 8. The new contract would not impact the pilots of American Eagle-branded operations.

Read the full article: CLICK HERE

However despite this optimism, the union’s president issued this statement:

Since I forwarded management’s initial joint collective bargaining agreement economic proposals to you yesterday, the feedback we have received on the proposals has been overwhelmingly negative. No disagreement here. Management’s initial proposals are seriously lacking on various fronts.

After reading the letter from American Airlines President Scott Kirby yesterday morning addressed to the APA board of directors, your APA leadership expected something a lot different from what we received. Mr. Kirby noted that issues regarding Scope bring with them “a lot of history and skepticism,” and he’s right. The contrast between Mr. Kirby’s letter and the proposals that followed will only add to that baggage. While there was no call for an increase from 76 seats to 81 seats on commuter aircraft, management instead simply shifted their aim with a Scope proposal to add five seats to the medium-sized (up to 70 seats) regional jets. Moving this limitation would be well outside the industry standard. When compared to the industry standard, what management has proposed would dramatically increase the number of 70-seat commuter aircraft and related capacity flown by regional affiliates.

In addition, management does not appear to be interested in providing our pilots with a compensation package comparable to industry leader Delta Air Lines. While initially proposed pay rates are fractionally higher than Delta’s current pilot pay rates, there’s little adjustment for the absence of profit-sharing, which this year will equal 15 percent of annual earnings for Delta pilots. This means that American Airlines pilots’ compensation would continue to trail industry leader Delta by a significant margin. Meanwhile, our airline is producing its best-ever financial results, with forecasts of industry-leading profits and margins going forward. What’s wrong with this picture?

Delta’s CEO recently addressed the importance of a “positive employee culture” and “rewarding employees with pay for performance through profit sharing,” adding that it “drives revenue growth and better financial returns.” American Airlines management evidently believes otherwise. With the exception of Spirit Airlines, American Airlines is the only other airline that does not provide profit-sharing to its pilots.

Management’s initial proposals would have American Airlines pilots remaining under bankruptcy-era work rules and likewise do not address length-of-service credit and numerous other important quality-of-life issues that we have raised in bargaining. Additionally, their initial proposals fail to recognize that Delta pilots are on the cusp of negotiating a new contract that will likely lead to pay rate increases that will surpass management’s proposed pay rates in quick fashion.

During a recent conference, Mr. Kirby stated that better labor relations “lead to better financial results and better customer service.” Management’s initial proposals are inconsistent with that virtuous cycle and with the positive employee culture that has made this merger so successful thus far.

Where do we go from here? The APA board of directors convened at 1 p.m. today (November 12) to discuss management’s proposals and determine our next steps. The APA Negotiating Committee, Scope Committee, Industry Analysis Committee and director of economic and financial analysis addressed the board this afternoon.

Our goal remains a negotiated agreement reached at the bargaining table. Management’s latest proposals have made attaining our goal more challenging.

Copyright Photo: Brian McDonough/AirlinersGallery.com. Boeing 737-823 N964AN (msn 30093) completes its final approach to the runway at Washington Reagan National Airport (DCA).

American Airlines (current livery) aircraft slide show: AG Slide Show

 

APA meets with American Airlines CEO Doug Parker and will not agree to any Scope concessions

Allied Pilots Association logo

Allied Pilots Association-APA (Dallas/Fort Worth), representing the pilots of American Airlines (Dallas/Fort Worth) has issued this statement about its meeting with CEO Doug Parker and its concern about any Scope concessions:

The newly expanded APA board of directors — with duly designated chairmen and vice chairmen from CLT, PHL and PHX — is convening this week for the first time.

As a board, we are united concerning Scope. We understand and share your concerns prompted by senior management’s recent comments about our industry-standard 76-seat limit on regional affiliate aircraft. Management has indicated a desire to dilute that limitation and obtain a below-industry-standard Scope Clause in the ongoing joint collective bargaining agreement negotiations.

This afternoon (October 8), the full APA board met with American Airlines CEO Doug Parker. Our conversation with Mr. Parker was frank and cordial and covered a wide range of items. Foremost among them: We informed him that APA will not agree to any Scope concessions. Our actions now concerning Scope will help define the profession for the balance of our careers and for the next generation of aviators, and we are committed to securing industry-leading pay and work rules.

With the merger of American Airlines and US Airways succeeding beyond the most optimistic forecasts, management needs to address APA’s priorities concerning quality of life, work rules, and pay and benefits. Our pilots’ sacrifices, our efforts on the merger’s behalf and the vital role we play in the airline’s success must be appropriately acknowledged.

APA backs AA management for an American-US Airways merger

Allied Pilots Association logo

The Allied Pilots Association (APA), representing the 10,000 pilots of American Airlines (Dallas/Fort Worth) has also backed management and issued this statement:

The president of the Allied Pilots Association (APA), certified collective bargaining agent for the 10,000 pilots of American Airlines, reiterated the union’s commitment to seeing the proposed merger of American Airlines and US Airways through to its fruition.

“Approving the merger is in the best interests of all concerned,” APA President Capt. Keith Wilson said. “We are disappointed that the U.S. Department of Justice has challenged the merger and look forward to the opportunity to highlight the merger’s many benefits.”

The Justice Department, six state attorneys general and the District of Columbia filed a civil antitrust lawsuit today challenging the proposed merger of the two carriers.

“The pilots of American Airlines remain fully committed to merging with US Airways, which will provide for a more secure future for the 100,000 men and women who work for the two airlines,” Wilson said. “As for the notion that the merger would be anti-competitive, the two airlines’ route structures are highly complementary with very little overlap. Combining the two carriers would significantly expand the choice of travel destinations available to consumers.

“Also, the combination of American Airlines and US Airways would create a network carrier comparable to Delta and United in terms of revenue and reach, establishing an important competitive counter balance to those two airlines.

“Consolidation has enabled our industry to stabilize after a round of Chapter 11 bankruptcies that were the result of various exogenous shocks, including terrorist attacks, fuel price spikes and pandemics. It makes no sense for the Justice Department to conclude now that airline industry consolidation is somehow undesirable.”

US Airways’ CEO Doug Parker vows to fight the decision by the DOJ. Now the real negotiations will begin on what AA-US are willing to give up, especially at Washington Reagan National. Read the interview in Forbes: CLICK HERE