Tag Archives: Piedmont Airlines (2nd)

Today an era ends at Piedmont Airlines

Today, as we previously reported, Piedmont Airlines will operate its last Dash 8 revenue flight.

 

 

Last night Piedmont made this announcement on social media:

On the eve of retiring our fleet of Dashes, we welcomed our 47th Embraer jet to the fleet! Bittersweet day ahead, Piedmont team.

All images above by Piedmont Airlines.

American Eagle-Piedmont aircraft slide show:

Bottom Copyright Photo: American Eagle (2nd)-Piedmont Airlines (2nd) Bombardier DHC-8-311 Dash 8 (Q300) N336EN (msn 336) CLT (Jay Selman). Image: 403769.

American Eagle (2nd)-Piedmont Airlines (2nd) Bombardier DHC-8-311 Dash 8 (Q300) N336EN (msn 336) CLT (Jay Selman). Image: 403769.

Advertisements

Piedmont Airlines to operate the last DHC-8 Dash 8 flight on July 4, 2018

American Eagle (2nd)-Piedmont Airlines (2nd) Bombardier DHC-8-311 Dash 8 (Q300) N337EN (msn 284) CLT (Jay Selman). Image: 403770.

Piedmont Airlines (2nd) began Embraer ERJ 145 (EMB-145) regional jet revenue service for American Airlines as an American Eagle carrier in February 2016.

The arrival of the EMB-145s marked the sixth Piedmont transition to new aircraft since 1962.

The change prior to this came in 1985 when Henson Aviation moved from the four-engine de Havilland Canada DHC-7-100 Dash 7 turboprop (below) to the newer Dash 8.

Allegheny Commuter - Henson Airlines de Havilland Canada DHC-7-102 Dash 7 N903HA (msn 52) PHL (Bruce Drum). Image: 103193.

Above Copyright Photo: Allegheny Commuter – Henson Airlines de Havilland Canada DHC-7-102 Dash 7 N903HA (msn 52) PHL (Bruce Drum). Image: 103193.

Piedmont is in the process of retiring the last DHC-8-300 Dash 8, with the final DHC-8-300 revenue flight scheduled for July 4, 2018. The final flight will be a passenger service from Charlotte to the Piedmont headquarters in Salisbury, Maryland.

Piedmont currently has 46 Embraer 145 regional jets in its fleet, with two additional jets arriving each month.

Henson Aviation was formed by Richard A. Henson in 1961 as a FBO in Hagerstown, MD. His Hagerstown Commuter began operations on October 1, 1962.

Henson became an Allegheny Commuter airline in 1967. The company shifted to flying for Piedmont Airlines (1st) in 1983.

The first de Havilland Canada DHC-8-102 entered revenue service for Henson Airlines on May 2, 1985 with a flight between Salisbury, MD and Baltimore-Washington International Airport (BWI).

Henson Airlines-Piedmont Regional Airline de Havilland Canada DHC-8-102 Dash 8 N917HA (msn 75) MIA (Bruce Drum). Image: 103719.

Above Copyright Photo: Henson Airlines-Piedmont Regional Airline de Havilland Canada DHC-8-102 Dash 8 N917HA (msn 75) MIA (Bruce Drum). Image: 103719.

Henson Airlines (Henson Aviation) operated the DHC-8 Dash 8s for Piedmont Airlines as the Piedmont Regional Airline and later as Piedmont for USAir as USAir Express.

Airline Color Scheme - Introduced 2005

Above Copyright Photo: US Airways Express-Piedmont Airlines (2nd) Bombardier DHC-8-102 N807EX (msn 292) CLT (Bruce Drum). Image: 101955.

Below Copyright Photo: US Airways Express-Piedmont Airlines (2nd) Bombardier DHC-8-311 N326EN (msn 234) CLT (Bruce Drum). Image: 102365.

US Airways Express-Piedmont Airlines (2nd) Bombardier DHC-8-311 Dash 8 (Q300) N326EN (msn 234) CLT (Bruce Drum). Image: 102365.

Henson was renamed Piedmont Airlines (2nd) in 1993 to preserve the Piedmont name. Piedmont Airlines operated the DHC-8 Dash 8 for USAir Express, US Airways Express and now as an American Eagle carrier.

Piedmont previously retired the DHC-8-100 Dash 8 (below) on November 29, 2017.

American Eagle (2nd)-Piedmont Airlines (2nd) Bombardier DHC-8-102 Dash 8 N807EX (msn 292) CLT (Jay Selman). Image: 403765.

Above Copyright Photo: American Eagle (2nd)-Piedmont Airlines (2nd) Bombardier DHC-8-102 Dash 8 N807EX (msn 292) CLT (Jay Selman). Image: 403765.

The DHC-8-200 was previously retired in 2008 (below).

According to Piedmont Airlines, here are the destinations served by their Dash 8s throughout history:

Airline Color Scheme - Introduced 1989 (USAir)

Above Copyright Photo: USAir Express-Piedmont Airlines (2nd) de Havilland Canada DHC-8-201 Dash 8 N990HA (msn 428) MIA (Bruce Drum). Image: 104040.

Top Copyright Photo: American Eagle (2nd)-Piedmont Airlines (2nd) Bombardier DHC-8-311 Dash 8 (Q300) N337EN (msn 284) CLT (Jay Selman). Image: 403770.

Below Copyright Photo: American Eagle (2nd)-Piedmont Airlines (2nd) Bombardier DHC-8-311 Dash 8 (Q300) N330EN (msn 274) CLT (Trent Sellers). Image: 942659.

American Eagle (2nd)-Piedmont Airlines (2nd) Bombardier DHC-8-311 Dash 8 (Q300) N330EN (msn 274) CLT (Trent Sellers). Image: 942659.

American Eagle-Piedmont aircraft slide show:

Piedmont Airlines officially retires the last DHC-8-100 Dash 8 from scheduled service, some will continue as a back-up aircraft

24232385_864348037066793_2352404144309515125_n.jpg

Piedmont Airlines, as planned, officially retired the last de Havilland Canada DHC-8-100 Dash 8 from scheduled service from the Philadelphia hub on November 29, 2017.

The type goes back to the Henson Airlines days. The last scheduled flight was flight AA 4810 from Philadelphia to the Salisbury, MD base with the pictured N806EX.

24059199_864347947066802_7105943151055256793_n.jpg

The airline made the following short announcement on November 29, 2017 on social media:

24293933_864347880400142_1543709706599871537_n.jpg

Our last scheduled Dash-8-100 flight happens later on November 29, 2017 (PHL-SBY 4810) so it’s fitting that we also received jet #34 this morning. 100s are still being used as spares, so don’t be surprised if you see one out in the wild somewhere.

Interesting day at Piedmont – we said goodbye to the Dash 8 in PHL and HVN, introduced the Embraer-145 in IPT and took delivery of our 34th jet in SBY (below).

24177105_864081350426795_905587799410849853_n.jpg

Piedmont Airlines is due to retire the larger DHC-8-300 Dash 8 in July 2018.

Bottom Copyright Photo (all others by Piedmont Airlines): The pictured N837EX was operating from the Charlotte hub on November 29, 2017 as a spare aircraft. American Eagle (2nd)-Piedmont Airlines (2nd) Bombardier DHC-8-102 Dash 8 N837EX (msn 217) (Piedmont Airlines colors) DCA (Brian McDonough). Image: 935577.

American Eagle (2nd)-Piedmont Airlines (2nd) Bombardier DHC-8-102 Dash 8 N837EX (msn 217) (Piedmont Airlines colors) DCA (Brian McDonough). Image: 935577.

Piedmont Airlines passenger service agents to protest low wages outside PHL, CLT and PHX International Airports

Airline Color Scheme - Introduced 2013

The union representing the Pidemont Airlines (2nd) passenger service agents have made this announcement:

Piedmont Airlines passenger service agents, members of the Communications Workers of America, will picket Piedmont operations at Philadelphia International Airport; Charlotte Douglas International Airport, and Sky Harbor International Airport in Phoenix, AZ on Monday, Nov. 20.

Agents are frustrated that contract negotiations have been dragging on for the past year, and are calling for the airline to get serious about negotiating a fair contract.

CWA represents 4,600 Piedmont agents nationwide, as well as 3,800 agents at Envoy and 14,000 passenger service agents at American Airlines.

Agents and allies are demonstrating their determination to get a fair contract and end the pay gap between regional airlines and mainline carriers. Despite extensive job responsibilities and long hours, Piedmont agents’ pay is less than half of the pay of mainline agents’ pay.

What: Protest and leafleting outside Piedmont operations at PHL, CLT and PHX.

When: Protest will be held on Monday, Nov. 20, in PHL from 8 am-11 am and 2 pm-5 pm; in CLT from 7 am-1 pm, and in PHX from 10 am-11:30 am. (all events are local time.)

Why: Piedmont agents help connect American Airlines passengers to their destinations every day and are proud of their contribution to American’s success. But Piedmont has been stalling and dragging its feet in negotiating a fair contract with the workers who help make it successful.

Copyright Photo: American Eagle (2nd)-Piedmont Airlines (2nd) Bombardier DHC-8-311 Dash 8 (Q300) N328EN (msn 281) CLT (Jay Selman). Image: 402765.

Joel Chusid’s Airline Corner – March 2015

Joel Chusid’s Airline Corner – March 2015

Assistant Editor Joel Chusid

Assistant Editor Joel Chusid

By Assistant Editor Joel Chusid

The Clampetts are Back

In the past few months, the global media has breathlessly reported on a series of incidents in China where passengers did seemingly unthinkable things on board commercial airliners. These ranged from throwing hot noodles at a flight attendant on a Thai AirAsia flight enroute to Nanjing over a seating dispute to numerous cases of passengers opening emergency exits on a number of different airlines at various stages of flight, before takeoff, while taxiing to a gate after landing and, thankfully unsuccessfully, in midflight. The reasons varied, to protest an extended delay, to “get fresh air” or “get off quicker” or inebriation. A rural farmer lit up a cigarette in the lav on a Cathay Pacific flight. Most, if not all, of these passengers ended up in jail, and the Chinese government introduced a “National Uncivilized Travel Record”, a sort of no-fly list for bad behavior, on which the errant passengers names were recorded. Why? Well, as living standards in China have risen, more and more passengers have taken to the air for the first time whereas in the past the train was the most common mode of inter-city transportation. China does have an enviable high speed rail system, but train tickets now can sometimes cost the same as an air ticket. This brings back memories of American Airlines’ introduction of “Value Pricing” in 1992, which resulted in a fare war that made flying too cheap to pass up for people who hadn’t previously flown. Those passengers new to air travel, were called, in airline speak, “FIRID” (for “first time flyer”), although they became known as “The Clampetts” and that summer of full flights was labeled “The Clampett Summer”. The Clampetts were a fictional family on a US situation comedy called “The Beverly Hillbillies” that ran in the late 1960s who had struck it rich, but were unfamiliar with creature comforts of living in a mansion. Stories that summer about passengers unfamiliar with airline travel, such as not opening a window, smoking, not knowing what to do with a seat belt and much more emerged among the employee ranks. These kinds of incidents also happen elsewhere, due to the unfamiliarity of an airplane in emerging nations. Although these incidents are far from comical; they can result in expenses, inconvenience to others and, yes indeed, a threat to safety. In the meantime, when flying in China, keep an eye on your fellow passenger as this era, too, shall pass, as air travel becomes more routine.

Speaking of Smoking

Why do airplanes still have no smoking signs lit up? Can you believe it’s been 25 years since flights (of six hours of less) became no smoking in the U.S.? Not long after that, all flights were smoke free. The rest of the world soon followed. The American Heart Association and other health organizations celebrated that anniversary on February 23 of this year. There are some of us who remember upon check-in, being asked “smoking or no smoking” and when boarding passes reflected that option and yellow nicotine stains were obvious around air vents – and seats had ashtrays. Most airlines relegated smoking to the rear of the cabin, which meant the back of the economy class section but also the last row or two of first class. Essentially, after takeoff, when today the announcement about electronic devices is made, it used to be the “smoking is now permitted” PA. Some passengers in the non-smoking section would congregate near the rear galleys to grab a smoke. On some airlines, such as Lufthansa, as I experienced, “to be equitable”, smoking was permitted on one entire side of the aircraft.

Noah’s Ark

Yes, the “Ark” is coming to New York’s JFK International Airport. Not quite Noah’s, but it’s for animals and their travel experience. The new $48 million, 178,000 square foot transport and quarantine “terminal” will handle 70,000 domestic and wild animals annually when it opens next year. The Ark is designed with its customers in mind to reduce the stress of travel, with an animal arrival and departure lounge, gourmet food, showers, an overnight pet resort called “Paradise 4 Paws” and veterinarian services. The facility is being designed out of the former Cargo Building 78 and will feature climate controlled vehicles for transfer to and from aircraft. For horses, planes can taxi directly to the terminal. Of note is the livestock handling section which has been designed with the input of famed animal welfare advocate Temple Grandin.

Copyright Photo Above: Antony J. Best/AirlinersGallery.com. Up-close nose view of Icelandair’s special Aurora Borealis color scheme on Boeing 757-256 TF-FIU (msn 26243).

The Northern Lights, Outside and Inside

Icelandair, in recognition of the Aurora Borealis, has introduced a new livery on one of its Boeing 757s that flies back and forth between Europe and North America, via Iceland, of course. But in addition to the paint job of the plane named Hekla Aurora, the airline has fitted the interior with blue and green LED lighting that brings the natural phenomena inside. The company says it celebrates the Icelandic stopovers they are known for, since it is one of the places in the world where the Aurora Borealis can be seen most often. Actually Reykjavik is a cool (as in fun, not temperature) place for a stopover, where 365 days a year, one can breathe clean air, eat fresh seafood, or swim in one of the many naturally indoor or outdoor heated pools or relax in the man-made Blue Lagoon, which is right near the airport.

Copyright Photo Below: Richard Vandervord/AirlinersGallery.com. A side view of TF-FIU.

Amenity Kit Retro

American-Piedmont amenity kit (MBI)(LRW)

Above Copyright Photo: Michael B. Ing/AirlinersGallery.com. The Piedmont Airlines version of the new American Airlines legacy carrier amenity kits.

Since we’re talking liveries, American Airlines has introduced special liveries of its predecessor companies. That’s not unusual, but now it’s taken the same idea to its amenity kits, which are distributed to first and business class passengers on long-haul international routes. The kits, which contain the usual items like eye masks, moisturizer, toothbrush and toothpaste and such, are sized to be used as a cover for mini tablets. They’ll be debuted over several months.

AG Hang one of our framable prints

Piedmont Airlines’ pilots approve the new contract, will fly American Eagle jets

Piedmont Airlines’ (2nd) (US Airways Express and American Eagle) (Salisbury, MD) pilots, represented by the Air Line Pilots Association, International (ALPA), voted to ratify amendments to their current agreement with the company. With 86 percent of the pilot group participating in the ballot, 77 percent of those pilots voted to approve the modifications to their current contract, which includes plans to refleet the airline as well as guaranteed opportunities for Piedmont pilots with the airline’s parent company, American Airlines.

“With much of our fleet of Dash 8s nearing replacement age, we needed to look long term as to what was best for the pilots on the property now, and what would provide career options for pilots just joining Piedmont,” said Capt. Bruce Freedman, chairman of the Piedmont unit of ALPA.

Under the modified agreement, Piedmont pilots can now take advantage of a seniority-based flow-through procedure to fly at American Airlines, and pilots have secured flying at Piedmont by obtaining minimum fleet commitments. In exchange, Piedmont pilots agreed to increase their share of medical premium payments and, over time, revise pay scales to reflect more commonly used industry approaches.

Copyright Photo: Jay Selman/AirlinersGallery.com. The Bombardier DHC-8 turboprop fleet is gradually being repainted. However the Dash 8s will need to be replaced and this new agreement paves the way for the company to fly American Eagle jets in the future. Bombardier DHC-8-314 N329EN (msn 290) departs from the Charlotte hub.

US Airways Express-Piedmont Airlines: AG Slide Show

Piedmont Airlines’ flight attendants ratify the new contract

Piedmont Airlines’ (2nd) (US Airways Express) (Salisbury) flight attendants, a wholly owned subsidiary of American Airlines Group, represented by the Association of Flight Attendants-CWA (AFA-CWA), have voted to ratify a new five-year collective bargaining agreement that was reached on March 6. The new contract was ratified by the airline’s 180 flight attendants who are based in Harrisburg, PA; Salisbury, MA; Charlottesville, VA; Roanoke, VA and New Bern, NC.

Copyright Photo: Bruce Drum/AirlinersGallery.com. Bombardier (de Havilland Canada) DHC-8-102 N908HA (msn 015) of Piedmont Airlines (2nd) taxies to the runway at the Charlotte Douglas International Airport (CLT) hub.

Piedmont Airlines-US Airways Express: AG Slide Show