Tag Archives: frankfurt airport

Drone sighting disrupts traffic at Frankfurt Airport

A drone sighting near Frankfurt Airport this morning halted all operations for around 45 minutes at FRA until the issue was resolved.

Read the full report from The Local: CLICK HERE

 

Lufthansa to fly to Nairobi again

Lufthansa (Frankfurt) starting on October 27 will resume flying to Nairobi, the capital of Kenya. The airline will utilize Airbus A340-300s to fly between Frankfurt and Nairobi four times a week in winter 2015/16 and five times a week from December 11. Flight LH 590 will leave Lufthansa’s Frankfurt hub every morning on Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays and Sundays (and on Fridays from December 11, 2015 to the end of January 2016) and will reach Nairobi in the evening after a journey of more than eight hours.

The return aircraft will take off from Nairobi as a night flight in the late evening and lands the morning of the following day at Frankfurt Airport.

Copyright Photo: Bruce Drum/AirlinersGallery.com. Airbus A340-313 D-AIFF (msn 447) approaches the runway at Charlotte Douglas International Airport.

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Lufthansa to fly to Panama City

Lufthansa (Frankfurt) is further expanding its route network to South America. From November 16, 2015, the airline will offer year-round flights to Panama City for the first time, subject to government approval.

An Airbus A340-300 aircraft will fly five times a week between Frankfurt and the economic metropolis in Central America. Flight LH 484 will take off from Lufthansa’s Frankfurt hub in the morning at 10.15 a.m. and arrive in Panama City in the afternoon at 4.40 p.m. (local time) after a flight time of 12 hours and 25 minutes. The return flight LH 485 will depart from Panama City in the early evening as a night flight and land at Frankfurt Airport the following morning.

Lufthansa is also expanding its partnership with Copa Airlines. Lufthansa passengers will in future be able to easily reach a further 50 destinations in Central and South America and the Caribbean with the partner airline.

Copyright Photo: Bruce Drum/AirlinersGallery.com. Airbus A340-313 D-AIFE (msn 434) lands at Miami.

Lufthansa aircraft slide show:

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Lufthansa to fly to Aalborg and Keflavik

Lufthansa (Frankfurt) will expand its European services in next year’s summer flight timetable. From March 29, 2015, the airline will be operating a new route from Frankfurt Airport to Aalborg in Jutland, Denmark, with 14 flights a week.

The commercial and university city will be Lufthansa’s third destination in Denmark, after Copenhagen and Billund.

The airline will also be launching a twice-weekly nonstop service between Frankfurt and Keflavik (near Reykjavík), Iceland, from May 2, until September 26, 2015. The Aalborg route will have two flights a day with a Bombardier CRJ900 aircraft, with 90 seats in Business and Economy Class. The service will depart from the Lufthansa hub every morning at 8.25 a.m. as flight LH 844 and every afternoon at 4.10 p.m. as flight LH 846, arriving in Aalborg at 10.05 a.m. and 5.50 p.m. respectively. The return flights will land in Frankfurt at 12.25 p.m. and 8.10 p.m. respectively.

The service to Keflavik (Reykjavík) will operate on Thursdays and Saturdays with an Airbus A319, with 138 seats in Business and Economy Class. Flight LH 856 will take off from Frankfurt in the morning and land in Reykjavík around midday. Flight LH 857 will arrive back at Frankfurt Airport in the early evening.

Copyright Photo: Paul Denton/AirlinersGallery.com. Airbus A319-112 D-AIBB (msn 4182) taxies at Geneva.

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Lufthansa is facing another pilot’s strike tomorrow

Lufthansa (Frankfurt) meanwhile is facing another day of strikes tomorrow (September 30) by its pilots, represented by the Vereinigung Cockpit union. The strike revolves around a dispute concerning retirement benefits.

The union issued this statement (translated from German):

The Vereinigung Cockpit (VC) 2014 plans industrial action at Lufthansa for tomorrow Tuesday, September 30.

Lufthansa pilots are on September 30, 2014 from 8.00 – 23.00 local time will strike on long-haul flights with the aircraft types Airbus A380, Boeing 747, Airbus A330 and Airbus A340 will not perform any departures from Frankfurt Airport. With this strike, a new collective agreement transitional care will be achieved.

Since Lufthansa management has not submitted any compromise or competitive offer, we are forced to take these other measures.

The Vereinigung Cockpit declares that it is always ready to avert strikes. We regret any inconvenience to the customers of Lufthansa.

Copyright Photo: Ton Jochems/AirlinersGallery.com. Airbus A380-841 D-AIMB (msn 041) arrives back at the Frankfurt hub.

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Lufthansa resumes normal operations after the pilot’s union Vereinigung Cockpit calls off its strike

Lufthansa (Frankfurt) issued this statement:

The pilots union Vereinigung Cockpit has cancelled the strike announcement for today (September 16).

Lufthansa pilots logo

Lufthansa has already returned to the regular flight schedule.

Previously the company published a special flight plan for all 40 long-haul flights from Frankfurt.

The union called off the strike after they received a new offer from company management.

Copyright Photo: Ole Simon/AirlinersGallery.com. Airbus A380-841 D-AIME (msn 061) departs from the Frankfurt hub.

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Lufthansa to change take-off procedures on June 1 to lower fuel consumption and reduce CO2 emissions

Lufthansa (Frankfurt) has issued this statement about new take-off procedures for its flights outside of Germany:

Lufthansa is set to change its take-off procedure for all departures outside Germany, thereby implementing worldwide standards. As of June 1, 2013, the altitudes for using the climb thrust and for further accelerating Lufthansa aircraft that are taking off will change from 1,500 feet (approx. 457 metres) to 1,000 feet (approx. 305 metres). This procedure is standard at most German and international airports and is already used by many airlines as it leads to lower fuel consumption and a reduction in CO2 emissions. At Frankfurt Airport, many airlines today are already benefiting from this take-off procedure.

Before it is introduced at German airports, the effects of the more level take-off will first be examined in a sound measurement test phase. Lufthansa expects the effects to be positive overall, as aircraft will be in a low-resistance, and therefore less noisy, configuration at an earlier stage. This assumption will be tested at Frankfurt Airport in a trial run from 1 July until 30 September 2013 by measuring selected flights, while all other flights will take off as before for the purpose of comparison. The sound measurements will be evaluated in co-ordination with the independent Airport and Region Forum (“Forum Flughafen und Region”). A scientific study was previously commissioned at the German Aerospace Center, which predicted only minimal sound changes as a result of the new take-off procedure.

The objective of this step-by-step process is to transparently record and evaluate reliable measurement data for noise levels during the new procedure. Once the data has been analysed, it will be decided whether the 1000-foot acceleration will be introduced at German airports.

What does 1000-foot acceleration mean?

After an aircraft takes off from the runway, it usually ascends at a constant speed with the flaps extended until it reaches a certain altitude. Modern aircraft generally do not use the maximum thrust available at this point, but rather a reduced level of take-off thrust. When the aircraft reaches an initial target altitude, the engines’ thrust switches to climb thrust. As the aircraft continues to take off, it has to accelerate so that the flaps can be retracted and it can climb to its cruising altitude at a higher speed. The altitude at which the speed increase begins is called the acceleration altitude.

By changing these two altitudes, the wind resistance decreases when the flaps are retracted, thus lowering fuel consumption. Lufthansa expects that changing the procedure in Frankfurt alone would save around 2,200 tons of fuel per year. This would mean around 7,000 tons fewer CO2 emissions. The benefit for the environment is much greater worldwide: approx. 6,000 tons less kerosene, or around 18,000 tons less CO2.

A reduction in the acceleration altitude from 1,500 to 1,000 feet is permitted under ICAO regulations and is already standard practice at many airlines. Any procedural changes to an airline’s operations manual must be notified to the national supervisory authority. For German airlines, this is the German Federal Aviation Authority (LBA). The LBA and the German Federal Ministry of Transport, Building and Urban Development have already granted Lufthansa permission to change the procedure.

Copyright Photo: Michael B. Ing/AirlinersGallery.com. Boeing 747-830 D-ABYF (msn 37830) climbs away from Los Angeles International Airport.

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