Tag Archives: Ukraine

The Netherlands has now identified 262 victims of Malaysia Airlines flight MH 17, one was found wearing an oxygen mask

Malaysia MH 17 Flight Route Map

The investigation in the downing of Malaysia Airlines flight MH 17 in the Ukraine continues with the Government of the Netherlands taking the lead. According to this report by CNN, one passenger was found wearing an oxygen mask suggesting the passenger had time to don the mask. The shoot down and crash occurred in the pro-Russian rebel portions of the eastern Ukraine (see above) near Donetsk.

Read the full report: CLICK HERE

On October 3, 2014 the Government of the Netherlands issued this statement about the victims of Malaysia Airlines flight MH 17 over eastern Ukraine.

It was announced that a further 11 victims of the MH 17 air disaster have been identified. Of these 11 victims, 8 were Dutch nationals and 3 were nationals of other countries. This brings the total number of victims of the disaster now identified to 262.

The next of kin of these victims have been informed. The mayors of the municipalities in which the victims lived will also be notified if, when consulted, the next of kin express a desire for this to be done. At the request of the relevant countries’ embassies, the nationalities of the identified victims who were not from the Netherlands has not been disclosed.

A team of specialists is currently hard at work on identifying victims of the disaster. However, as was previously stressed, it may take some time before all the victims have been identified. The media will be provided with periodic updates on the progress made.

On July 17, 2014 Malaysia Airlines flight MH 17 crashed in the Ukraine on its way from Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur. On board were 283 passengers and 15 crew members. Among the passengers were 196 Dutch citizens.

Map: PM3/Wikipedia Creative Commons.

Flight routes of MH 17 and Singapore Airlines flight SQ 351 including airspace restrictions.

Route of Malaysia Airlines flight 17 on July 17, 2014 at 12:55 to 13:20 UTC, and Singapore Airlines flight SQ 351 at 13:08 to 13:27 UTC; flight data from Flightradar24 (MH 17, SQ 351), rendered map from OpenStreetMap; restricted airspace zones as to NOTAMs A1383/14 and A1492/14.

Kharkiv Airlines adds two new routes to Istanbul

Kharkiv Airlines (Kharkiv, Ukraine) on September 16 added two new routes Istanbul (Sabiha Gokcen) from both Odessa and Kharkiv. Kharkiv is in disputed eastern portion of the Ukraine.

Kharkiv Airlines, a charter airline until now, becomes a scheduled carrier with these two routes.

Copyright Photo: Karl Corni/AirlinersGallery.com. Boeing 737-8Q8 UR-CLS (msn 32841) arrives in Antalya.

Kharkiv Airlines: AG Slide Show

Swiss to drop the Zurich-Kiev route on October 1

Swiss International Air Lines (Zurich) will drop the Zurich-Kiev route on October 1. It currently operates five flights a week with Airbus A320 family aircraft.

The airline issued this short statement:

Swiss will be withdrawing its present Zurich-Kiev service with effect from October 1. The service is being terminated for economic reasons, as business on the route has failed to develop in line with expectations. The service was introduced in the 2013/14 winter schedules.

Copyright Photo: Rolf Wallner/AirlinersGallery.com. Up-close action. Airbus A320-214 HB-JLT (msn 5518) with Sharklets touches down on the runway at the Zurich hub.

Swiss: AG Slide Show

Aeroflot and Transaero must obtain prior approval to fly over the Ukraine

The Ukrainian government (Kiev) is taking countermeasures after Russia banned Ukrainian airlines from flying over Russian airspace, severely impacting Ukrainian International Airlines (Kiev) as previously reported.

According to the Moscow Times, “Ukraine demanded that Russian airlines Aeroflot Russian Airlines (Moscow) and Transaero Airlines (Moscow) obtain permission for every flight they make over its territory, because these airlines fly over Crimean airspace which Ukraine considers to be closed.”

The new airspace rule became effective on August 14.

European airlines could face additional airspace restrictions by Russia on trans-Siberian routes following sanctions by the European Union of Russian due to its on-going interference in the Ukraine. If this “airspace war” continues to escalate, airlines like Finnair (Helsinki) could be severely impacted as previously reported.

Ironically Russia and the Ukraine were former members of the old Soviet Union.

Read the full report: CLICK HERE

In other news, Transaero is planning to introduce a weekly St. Petersburg-Vienna route (flown with Boeing 737-300s) starting on October 31.

Copyright Photo: Paul Denton/AirlinersGallery.com. Aeroflot’s Boeing 737-8LJ VP-BRF (msn 41195) completes its final approach to Dubai International Airport (DXB).

Aeroflot Russian Airlines: AG Slide Show

Transaero Airlines: AG Slide Show

 

60 international investigators reach the Malaysia Airlines MH 17 crash site today, Malaysian Police secure the site

Malaysia logo-1

According to CNN, 60 international investigators today (August 1) reached the crash site of Malaysia Airlines (Kuala Lumpur) flight MH 17 in the eastern part of the Ukraine where fighting continues. Malaysian Police, after receiving permission, have secured the crash site.

Read the full report: CLICK HERE

Last night (July 31) Prime Minister Najib Razak of Malaysia issued this statement:

Like the Netherlands, Malaysia is in mourning. We mourn the loss of all 298 lives on board MH 17.

And as we watched the first bodies arrive in Eindhoven, our hearts reached out to the people of the Netherlands, who have lost so much.

The flags flying at half-mast told their own story: of the nations who lost their sons and daughters. And of our determination to work together to bring them home.

Malaysia stands with the Netherlands, with Australia; with all countries whose people have been lost. We stand together, united in grief, and ready to help however we can.

Earlier, Prime Minister Rutte and I spoke about the continued military activity at the crash site; the inability of international investigators to deploy across it; and the human remains that may still lie there.

For the sake of the grieving families, it is imperative that all remains at the crash site are repatriated as soon as possible. Every single victim must be given dignity and a decent funeral.

Our other priority is to ensure the international investigators are given full and unfettered access to the site, so that they may collect evidence and carry out their vital work. Only then will we be able to find out what happened to MH 17; only then can we achieve justice for the victims and their families.

The conflict in Eastern Ukraine may not be easily resolved. But the people on board that plane had no part in it.

We ask that there be an immediate cessation of hostilities in and around the crash site – by both Ukrainian and separatist forces.

We ask that all sides respect the lives lost, and the integrity of the site, so that the investigation may proceed. The long walk towards justice begins with this step.

A team of 68 Malaysian police has arrived in Kiev. They will work together with the Dutch and Australian teams to help secure access to the site.

Malaysia fully supports the international investigation, and we are grateful to the Netherlands for their lead role in the international team.

Repatriating the remains of victims as fast as possible is a shared priority. Malaysian experts are already helping here in the Netherlands with the painstaking task of identification – and we stand ready to provide more assistance if required.

On behalf of Malaysia, I would like to thank Prime Minister Rutte and the Dutch people for all they have done, and continue to do, for the victims of this senseless and tragic act.

Thank you.

Malaysia Airlines MH 17 investigators are unable to go to the crash site due to fighting in eastern Ukraine

Malaysia logo-1

CNN is reporting the following concerning the on-going investigation of the shoot down of Malaysia Airlines flight MH 17 in eastern Ukraine:

“International investigators and observers were again prevented from reaching the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 on Tuesday (July 29) by fierce fighting in the area between pro-Russian rebels and Ukrainian forces.

The Dutch Justice Ministry said the team was unable to leave the city of Donetsk because “there is too much fighting at the moment on and near the route to the disaster site.”

Read the full report: CLICK HERE

IATA makes a statement about Malaysia Airlines flight MH 17

IATA logo

The International Air Transport Association (IATA), representing the international airlines, has made the following statement of the shoot-down of Malaysia Airlines:

Statement of IATA’s Director General and CEO Tony Tyler:

“The tragedy of MH 17 is an outrage. Over the weekend it was confirmed that the passengers and crew aboard the aircraft were the victims of a hideous crime. It was also an attack against the air transport system which is an instrument of peace.

Among the immediate priorities, the bodies of the victims must be returned to their grieving loved ones in a respectful manner. For over four days we witnessed appalling sights from the crash scene. Governments must set aside their differences and treat the victims and their families with the dignity they deserve – and this includes urgently securing the site.

The investigation must also start quickly and with total freedom and access. Actions over the weekend which slowed down progress on both of these priorities were an outrage to human decency.

We have heard news of potential progress on both these issues. But promises now need to be turned into reality with actions.

Airlines and governments are partners in supporting global connectivity. Airlines carry the passengers and cargo. Governments and air navigation service providers inform airlines about the routes that they can fly and with what restrictions. Airlines comply with that guidance.

That was the case with MH 17. Malaysia Airlines was a clearly identified commercial jet. And it was shot down—in complete violation of international laws, standards and conventions—while broadcasting its identity and presence on an open and busy air corridor at an altitude that was deemed to be safe.

No effort should be spared in ensuing that this outrage is not repeated. Of course, nobody should be shooting missiles at civilian aircraft—governments or separatists. Governments will need to take the lead in reviewing how airspace risk assessments are made. And the industry will do all that it can to support governments, through ICAO, in the difficult work that lies ahead.

This was a terrible crime. But flying remains safe. And everyone involved in global air transport is fully dedicated to making it even safer.”