Tag Archives: Alaska

Alaska Airlines orders six additional Boeing 737-900 ERs

Alaska Airlines‘ (Seattle/Tacoma) fleet of fuel-efficient Boeing airplanes is growing again. Seattle’s hometown airline is purchasing six more Boeing 737-900 Extended Range aircraft, valued at $594 million, Boeing’s current list price. The new planes, four scheduled for delivery in 2016 and two in 2017, bring Alaska’s total of locally manufactured jets on order to 79.

Over the next few years, Alaska’s remaining 737-400s will be replaced with 737-900 ERs, which transport 25 percent more passengers on the same amount of fuel.

737 Space Bins at 737 Configuration Studio

Above Photo: Alaska Airlines.

Starting later this year, all of Alaska’s new 737-900 ERs will feature Boeing’s innovative Space Bins (above). The larger overhead bins have a similar look and feel to Alaska’s current pivot bins, yet will hold 48 percent more bags than the current bins. When open, the bin’s bottom edge hangs about 2 inches lower, which means customers don’t have to lift their bags as high to load them. The deeper bins allow more bags to be stowed, and let customers load bags with less struggle.

Top Copyright Photo: Michael B. Ing/AirlinersGallery.com. Boeing 737-990 ER N464AS (msn 40714) with Aviation Partners Boeing Split Scimitar Winglets arrives in Los Angeles.

Alaska Airlines aircraft slide show: AG Airline Slide Show

Video: Alaska Airlines’ beautiful new video. Alaska Airlines “Spirit of Disneyland II” and “Adventure of Disneyland Resort” photographed over Washington State and Arizona from a Clay Lacy Aviation Astrovision-equipped Learjet.

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Red Alert: Pavlof Volcano intensifies again in Alaska, flights advised to avoid the ash cloud

Pavlof Volcano

The Pavlof Volcano in the Alaska Peninsula has been a long-running safety concern in Alaska for aviators. The volcano has caused red alerts in the past. The ash cloud from the Pavlof Volcano has again reached 30,000 feet triggering a new round of aviation alerts.  The National Weather Service warned aviation interests that the ash cloud from the erupting volcano was spreading to the west and northwest of the volcano. The volcano intensified yesterday prompting the new aviation warnings. The volcano is the most active volcano in Alaska.

The volcano lies along major Asia-North America air traffic great circle routes.

Pavlof Volcano Information

The Alaska Volcano Observatory issued this statement yesterday (November 15):

PAVLOF VOLCANO (VNUM #312030)
55°25’2″ N 161°53’37” W, Summit Elevation 8261 ft (2518 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WARNING
Current Aviation Color Code: RED

The eruption of Pavlof Volcano that began on November 12 has intensified and the Aviation Color Code was raised to RED and the Volcano Alert Level to WARNING earlier today.

The intensity of seismic tremor remains at high levels and pilot reports though 12:30 AKST (21:30 UTC) indicate that the ash cloud height has increased to 30,000 ft above sea level. Satellite, pilot reports, and wind data show the ash cloud moving towards the northwest over the Bering Sea. Ash cloud height and direction will vary significantly through an eruption and aviation users should refer to the National Weather Service for updated SIGMETs on the ash cloud hazard (http://aawu.arh.noaa.gov/sigmets.php).

No reports of ash fallout on nearby communities have been reported, and the ash cloud is currently moving away from populated areas. We encourage observers to contact AVO should it occur (https://www.avo.alaska.edu/ashfall/ashreport.php). The National Weather Service has issued a Special Weather Statement for the possibility of ash fall in the vicinity of Pavlof and towards the northwest.

Description of the volcano:

From Miller and others (1998): “Pavlof Volcano is a largely snow-covered, cone-shaped mountain with a high ridge extending to the southwest towards the rim of Emmons Lake Caldera. The volcano is approximately 7 km in diameter and has active vents on the north and east sides close to the summit (McNutt and others, 1991). It is situated high on the northeastern flank of Emmons Lake Caldera along a northeast-trending alignment of vents that includes Pavlof Sister, and several intracaldera cones (Kennedy and Waldron, 1955). The stratovolcano is relatively undissected and is mostly Holocene in age. Pavlof lies within the Shumagin seismic gap (Davies and others, 1981).” The name Pavlof comes from Russian, translating to “Paul” or “Saint Paul”. This volcano name was first published as “Pavlovskoi Volcan” by Captain Lutke in 1836.

Ash Cloud Forecast: CLICK HERE

Top photo and map: Alaska Volcano Observatory/Carol Damberg.

 

Alaska Airlines brings the first seasonal Copper River salmon shipment to the “Lower 48”

Alaska Air Cargo (Alaska Airlines) (Seattle/Tacoma) today (May 16) delivered 24,100 pounds of the season’s first shipment of Alaska Copper River salmon to Seattle-Tacoma International Airport. The arrival of the fish-filled Boeing 737 marks the start of the summer salmon season and is an annual rite of passage anticipated by seafood lovers throughout the Pacific Northwest.

At least five more Alaska Airlines flights today will transport salmon from Cordova, Alaska, to Anchorage, Seattle and throughout the United States. The flights will have fresh fish from three Alaska seafood processors: Copper River Seafoods, Ocean Beauty Seafoods and Trident Seafoods.

Alaska Airlines plays a significant role in supporting the Alaska seafood industry, which is recognized worldwide for its sustainable fishing practices. Last year, the carrier flew more than 24.5 million pounds of fresh Alaska seafood to the Lower 48 states and beyond, including 1 million pounds of Copper River salmon.

“No other airline delivers more Copper River salmon to the Lower 48 than Alaska Airlines, and making that happen within 24 hours after the fish is pulled from the water is no small feat,” said Betsy Bacon, managing director of Alaska Air Cargo. “Hundreds of employees from across the state of Alaska, Seattle and beyond spend months getting ready for the busy summer fish season.”

5th annual Copper Chef Cook-off

Following the arrival of the first fish, three Seattle-area top chefs — John Howie, owner of Seastar, Jason Franey of Canlis and Ethan Stowell, owner of Tavolata — will compete for the best salmon recipe in Alaska Air Cargo’s fifth annual Copper Chef Cook-off. The chefs will have 30 minutes to prepare and serve the first catch of the season to a panel of judges, which include Seahawks place kicker Steven Hauschka; Jay Buhner, Seattle Mariners Hall of Famer; and Ben Minicucci, Alaska Airlines’ chief operating officer. The airline will announce the winner of the cook-off on Twitter @AlaskaAir. Fish lovers can follow the competition and share their favorite salmon recipes on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram using the hashtag #SalmonChef.

Among the onlookers awaiting the arrival of the first fish were 10 Alaska Airlines Mileage Plan MVP Gold members, and representatives from USO Northwest, the U.S. Marines and U.S. Coast Guard, who were invited to sample the season’s first Copper River salmon.

Anchorage hosts First Fish parade

Farther north, Copper River Seafoods and local Anchorage-area restaurants are also welcoming the arrival of Copper River salmon with festivities planned at Alaska Air Cargo at Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport. Later this afternoon, the seafood company will deliver a ceremonial first fish to seven downtown Anchorage restaurants.

Enhanced seafood quality training program

Copper River salmon shipped on Alaska Air Cargo arrives as fresh as possible to grocery stores and restaurants across the nation, thanks in part to a cool chain training program required of all airline employees who handle perishables. Alaska Air Cargo employees are required to adhere to strict seafood quality standards and pass an annual food quality course.

Seafood processors and shippers follow these cool-chain standards to provide a temperature-controlled environment for proper food handling. The goal is to keep seafood moving rapidly throughout its journey on Alaska Airlines and maintain a consistent temperature range from the time it leaves the water to when it arrives at stores and restaurants.

The first Copper River salmon was brought to SEA with their Boeing 737-400 Combi N765AS.

In other news, Alaska Airlines was awarded its seventh J. D. Power award as the best traditional network carrier.

Top Copyright Photo: Mark Durbin/AirlinersGallery.com. Beautifully displayed, Boeing 737-890 N559AS (msn 35178) is the second Alaska 737 to wear the special “Salmon-Thirty-Salmon” livery in support of the Alaska fisheries industry.

Alaska Airlines: AG Slide Show

Video: the ceremonial fish head “kick-off”:

Bottom Copyright Photo: Michael B. Ing/AirlinersGallery.com. Dedicated as a freighter, Boeing 737-490 (F) N709AS (msn 28896) climbs away from the runway at Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport (ANC).

Alaska Airlines becomes the first U.S. airline to allow self-tagging of bags on select routes

Alaska Airlines (Seattle/Tacoma) will be the first U.S. airline to allow self-tagging of bags from home on select introductory routes. The airline issued this statement:

Self-tag online debuts on April 21 for passengers traveling nonstop between Seattle/Tacoma and San Diego, Anchorage or Juneau, Alaska, with plans to expand the option for customers traveling from other airports later this summer. This launch follows the completion of a successful pilot program, which was offered to customers traveling between Seattle/Tacoma and Hawaii in 2013.

Starting on April 21, travelers flying to or from any of the four debut cities will receive a pre-trip email with a link to request a free reusable bag tag holder by mail. Tag holders will also be available to pick up at each of the four airports. Passengers who elect to self-tag will enjoy a designated Self-Tag Express™ lane when they arrive at the airport.

Alaska Self-Tag Express logo

How self-tag online works:

Book a trip at http://www.alaskaair.com.
Follow instructions in your pre-trip email to request a bag tag holder by mail or pick up a holder in person at one of the four participating airports.
Check in online up to 24 hours before your flight and follow the instructions to print a bag tag at home.
Insert printed bag tag into the tag holder.
At the airport, follow signs for Self-Tag Express™ lanes.
Show the agent your boarding pass, identification and drop off your bags.

Alaska Airlines is the first U.S. carrier to launch self-bag tagging from home, another chapter in the carrier’s long history of pioneering technologies and innovations to make flying easier. Alaska was the first airline in North America to sell tickets over the Internet, and the first in the world to allow customers to check in and print boarding passes online. Last year, the carrier installed kiosks with self-tagging printers at 10 airport locations including Seattle/Tacoma, Anchorage and Portland, Oregon.

Copyright Photo: Michael B. Ing/AirlinersGallery.com. Boeing 737-490 N703AS (msn 28893) departs from Anchorage International Airport (ANC), one of the introductory cities for self-tagging.

Alaska Airlines: AG Slide Show

Alaska Airlines is again the official airline of the Iditarod Dog Race

Alaska Airlines (Seattle/Tacoma) will again serve as the official airline sponsor of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race, marking the 36th year the carrier has supported the event.

As the official airline of the Iditarod, Alaska continues its tradition of presenting the Leonhard Seppala Humanitarian Award, which recognizes one musher for providing exemplary dog care and is considered the highest honor a competitor can receive. Voted on by trail veterinarians, the Leonhard Seppala award is named after one of Alaska’s most-celebrated mushers, whose 1925 sled-dog team traveled the longest distance to transport diphtheria serum to Nome.

As part of its sponsorship, Alaska Airlines also will help provide air transportation and dog-care supplies for 45 Iditarod veterinarians who come to Alaska from across the United States to care for the race dogs’ health and safety.

In addition, many Alaska Airlines employees contribute their time at the event. Among them are several pilots who lead the Iditarod Air Force, flying veterinarians, supplies and volunteers to remote checkpoints along the trail.

Copyright Photo: Michael B. Ing/AirlinersGallery.com. Boeing 737-490 N705AS (msn 29318) in the “Spirit of Alaska Statehood” special color scheme departs from Anchorage, Alaska.

Alaska Airlines: AG Slide Show

Delta’s flight 208 diverts to Cold Bay, Alaska, population 60

Delta logo

Delta Air Lines‘ (Atlanta) flight DL 208 with a Boeing 767-300 ER from Tokyo (Narita) to San Francisco yesterday (October 30) was forced to divert and make a safe landing at Cold Bay, Alaska (population 60) in the Aleutian chain of islands . The crew diverted due to a possible problem with one of the engines. Passengers and crew members were taken to a small community center where they waited for another aircraft. The long 10,000 foot runway was built by the military during the Aleutian campaign during World War II. The 167 passengers and 11 crew members finally made it to their final destination of San Francisco after another aircraft came to their rescue.

Read the full story from the Anchorage Daily News: CLICK HERE

Delta Air Lines: AG Slide Show

 

Horizon Air to use Q400 warm air bridges at Fairbanks, Alaska

Alaska Horizon DHC-8-400 Warm Airbridge (Alaska)(LRW)

Alaska Airlines (Seattle/Tacoma) has issued this statement for its Alaska Horizon (Horizon Air) Bombardier DHC-8-402 (Q400) cold weather operations in Fairbanks, Alaska:

Fairbanks residents flying on Alaska Airlines’ Bombardier Q400s starting next March will board and deplane the aircraft using the existing jet bridge at Fairbanks International Airport. The carrier will modify the jet bridge at Gate 1 to provide passengers with warm, easy access to their flights on the turboprop aircraft.

“We listened to customer concerns about boarding the plane outside during the winter and took our time to carefully evaluate all of our options,” said Marilyn Romano, Alaska Airlines’ regional vice president – Alaska. “With slight modifications to the existing jet bridge, our customers traveling between Fairbanks and Anchorage will have a way to board and deplane that protects them from the cold winter weather and is also safe and accessible for travelers with limited mobility.”

Alaska Airlines is exploring a warm boarding solution for customers boarding and deplaning the Q400 at Ted Stevens International Airport in Anchorage, Romano said.

Starting next March, Alaska will increase service between Anchorage and Fairbanks from seven to nine daily flights; eight flights will be operated with the Q400 and one with a Boeing 737. Additionally, the Q400 will replace an Alaska 737 on one of two daily round-trip flights between Anchorage and Kodiak. Initial service to Kodiak will begin March 3 and end April 30, then resume again for seasonal service between October and April.

Copyright Photo: Alaska Airlines.

Alaska Horizon: AG Slide Show

Alaska Airlines: AG Slide Show