Tag Archives: Alliance Airlines

Virgin Australia announces services between Brisbane and Alice Springs

Airline Color Scheme - Introduced 2002

Virgin Australia on March 19, 2018 announced it will commence services between Brisbane and Alice Springs, increasing its regional domestic network offering.

From June 19, 2018, Virgin Australia will operate a twice-weekly return service on Tuesdays and Thursdays under a wet lease agreement with Alliance Airlines, operated by Alliance’s Fokker 100 and Fokker 70 fleet of aircraft.

 

Services between Brisbane and Rockhampton, currently operated by Alliance’s Fokker 100 fleet, will also benefit with Virgin Australia upgrading two existing return flights to its Boeing 737 aircraft, adding over 300 seats per week in to the region.

Brisbane-Alice Springs Schedule

ROUTE FLIGHT NUMBER DEP/ARR DAYS OF THE WEEK
BNE-ASP VA1023 1015/1305 Tuesdays and Thursdays
ASP-BNE VA1026 1340/1700 Tuesdays and Thursdays

Copyright Photo: Alliance Airlines (Australia) Fokker F.28 Mk. 0100 (Fokker 100) VH-XWN (msn 11278) BNE (Peter Gates). Image: 906002.

Alliance Airlines aircraft slide show:

Virgin Australia aircraft slide show:

Advertisements

Alliance Airlines salutes Sir Charles Kingsford Smith and the 90th anniversary of the first trans-Pacific flight with a new logo jet

Alliance Airlines is celebrating the 90th anniversary of the first trans-Pacific flight. The airline has unveiled a Fokker 100 (VH-FGB) with a special livery. The airline will also offer a commemorative beer on the flights.

The Fokker displays an image of Sir Charles Kingsford Smith on the tail

The fuselage displays the Fokker F.VIIb/3m Trimotor “Southern Cross’.

VH-FGB was painted at Norwich and has been ferried to Australia.

 

The story according to Smithy’s FGB Golden Ale:

On June 9, 1928 the Southern Cross, a Fokker F.VIIb/3m Trimotor, settled on to the grass of Brisbane’s Eagle Farm Aerodrome, having left Oakland, USA, 10 days earlier.  The aircraft flew 11,585km and had been airborne for 84 hours, with refuelling stops in Hawaii and Fiji.

Chuffed with the first ever trans-Pacific flight, the Prime Minister, Stanley Bruce, presented a cheque for £5,000 to the flight crew.  Equally pleased the flight’s financial backer Californian, George Hancock, waived any right to recover his substantial investment.

It was Saturday night and hero Australian pilots, Brisbane born Charles Kingsford Smith “Smithy” and Melbourne born Charles Ulm, together with Americans, radio operator James Warner and American navigator and engineer Harry Lyon were thirsty, cashed up and debt free.

It’s not recorded what beer they celebrated their world record breaking flight with, but “Smithy that’s Fokkin’ Good Beer” was heard well in to the night.

Alliance Airlines is the world’s largest operator of Fokker aircraft and proudly commemorates the 90th Anniversary of the Southern Cross’s historic flight with Smithy’s FGB. Cheers!

The Southern Cross is on public display near Brisbane Airport’s International Terminal.

Photos of Alliance Airlines VH-FGB on social media:

Alliance Airlines aircraft slide show:

Route Map:

 

Alliance Airlines to operate its Fokker 100s for QANTAS Link, especially between Mount Isa and Brisbane

Alliance Airlines (Australia) Fokker F.28 Mk. 0100 (Fokker 100) VH-FKF (msn 11365) BNE (Peter Gates). Image: 906805.

QANTAS Airways has announced Alliance Airlines will take over some of the flights from Mount Isa staring on December 4, 2017 until about March 2018 due to operational performance issues according to The North West Star. Alliance will operate the flights under the QANTAS Link banner but the aircraft are not expected to be repainted.

Read the full report.

Copyright Photo: Alliance Airlines (Australia) Fokker F.28 Mk. 0100 (Fokker 100) VH-FKF (msn 11365) BNE (Peter Gates). Image: 906805.

Alliance Airlines Route Map:

Planely Speaking: Power Shift; Gulf Carriers Threat to Alliance Airlines

Guest Editor Aaron Newman

Guest Editor Aaron Newman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Guest Editor Aaron Newman

Power Shift; Gulf Carriers Threat to Alliance Airlines

By Aaron Newman

There are not many days that go by without seeing news come from the Middle East’s emergent airlines. Emirates Airline (Dubai), Etihad Airways (Abu Dhabi) and Qatar Airways (Doha) have been populating the headlines with large aircraft orders, launching new routes, new state-of-the art airports, and lavish onboard improvements. These three airlines have made established legacy carriers across the globe uneasy as they present a real threat to the established airlines bottom line. Alliance airlines like British Airways, KLM-Air France, Lufthansa, American and United have long dominated trans-oceanic high-yielding business markets. Are these industry mainstays slowly losing their grip?

Emergence of Gulf CarriersGulf Carriers - Come fly with us

Rapid economic development of Persian Gulf countries in the 1970’s and 80’s were due largely in part of the discovery of vast oil and gas reserves and the growth of OPEC. This caused large amounts of capital to flow into these small Gulf nations. Over time, small oil nations began looking for ways to diversify their country’s portfolio in a fear that oil reserves will eventually run out. These three state owned airlines are now an integral part of their countries respective economies. Qatar Airways for example, claims to count for 11% of the state’s GDP. Supported by friendly regulatory environments, government spending on airport infrastructures, and new, reliable long-haul aircraft, these carriers have transitioned from small regional airlines to global mainstays in a decade’s time.

 

 

Keys to Success

Access to cheap capital; the Gulf States have access to large cash reserves from oil and gas resources. This enables Persian Gulf nations to finance rapid growth, and offers support with airport development and infrastructure.

Graph Source: wsj.comGulf Carriers Taking Off

Regional competition; the Gulf airlines cooperate on many issues but also vigorously compete with each other, creating the need for efficient operations and continual product development to attract new customers.

Geography; the Middle East is ideally placed to link major global population centers. It sits at a cross-road between Europe, Africa and Asia.

Emerging market demand; demand from emerging markets is rising fast as a rapidly growing middle class has the time and money to consider travelling by air for leisure and business. The Gulf is located between the mature economies of Europe and the emerging markets of South East Asia, India, China and Africa.

A New Formidable Opponent

The Gulf airlines have combined home markets of only 7.5 million people, and so must rely on connecting passengers with a hub and spoke system. European airlines have been particularly hard hit by this, watching their natural customers travel on Gulf carriers instead of the country’s national carrier. Christoph Franz, former CEO of Lufthansa Group, highlights the challenging future of his prior company on a new Emirates route from Lisbon to Dubai saying , “we are talking about passengers who until now were primarily attracted by flights from Lisbon to Munich, in order to go on to Asian destinations. At least part of them are not flying via Germany anymore,” he says. “In the beginning we were talking about a competitive threat on paper – now we are talking about reality in our markets” (ft.com).

Copyright Photo: Keith Burton/AirlinersGallery.com. Etihad Airways Airbus A340-642 A6-EHF (msn 837) departs from London’s Heathrow Airport.

In a June warning to its investors, Lufthansa cautioned the possibility of downward revisions to the airlines earnings outlook. Chief Financial Officer Simone Menne cited pricing pressure from the Gulf carriers’ expansion into Europe as a major contributing factor. Gulf airlines, which are adding capacity in major European cities such as Paris and London, are also ramping up service in secondary cities like Barcelona and Hamburg. This means that they’re grabbing market share from the European carriers not only at their hubs, but also at their spokes.

Competing on American SoilGulf carriers - Average Age

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Gulf three now send nearly 120 large, new planes weekly to a growing number of American cities (WSJ.com). Though the United States and Canada are geographically better positioned than their European counterparts, the Gulf carriers still pose a credible threat. Airlines and governments in North America have been fighting back where they can. In Canada, the government has limited the number of planes that Etihad, Emirates and Qatar can land at its airports–a move to protect Air Canada, and its partner Lufthansa.

Graph Source: Emirates.

“Essentially, these are not airlines—they’re governments,” said Delta CEO Richard Anderson. “They have the ability to gain advantages in markets because profitability doesn’t matter.” He said the U.S. government should revisit its air treaties with other nations to ensure there is “equity” in commerce (wsj.com). Many industry analysts say U.S. opposition has slight chance of slowing down the Gulf carriers in the deregulated era. Washington is unlikely to alienate its Mideast allies, and Boeing, the U.S.’s biggest exporter, gets 10 percent of its wide-body orders from the Gulf carriers.

Looking Into the Future

With a backlog of more than 500 wide body aircraft orders, do not expect these airlines growth to subside. According to a recent report by Credit Suisse, Etihad Airways, Emirates, and Qatar Airways will increase the number of seats offered on their Europe-to-Asia flights between 8 and 18 percent a year between now and 2020 (thefinancialist.com). I believe you will continue to see these airlines enter more secondary markets to grab market share from legacy carriers. I envision cities like Chengdu, Sapporo, Brasilia, and Charlotte N.C. as cities that Gulf carriers will have their eyes on for future growth. With new airports and new aircraft, growth is inevitable; at this point it is not a matter of if Gulf carriers will continue to grow, but it appears to be a matter of when and where.

What can European, Southeast Asian and North American airlines do in response to the new threat to their long-haul business? Airlines must first cut costs. This is critical, particularly for European airlines to remain competitive. For example, Lufthansa needs to reduce costs on flights to Southeast Asia by 40 percent to stay competitive. Another example, according to Credit Suisse, Air France and IAG (British Airways Parent Company) has 30 percent higher unit costs on flights to Southeast Asia than some Asian competitors, Turkish Airlines, and Emirates (thefinancialist.com). Secondly, airlines could reduce route competition and shelter revenue by developing mutual partnerships with the Gulf carriers.  These relationships would make it easier for both Eurasian and North American carriers to get more customers into the Middle East, India and developing nations in Africa with little investment required. As the saying goes; if you can’t beat em,’ join em.’

Emirates: AG Slide Show

Etihad Airways: AG Slide Show

Qatar Airways: AG Slide Show

Bottom Copyright Photo: Stefan Sjogren/AirlinersGallery.com. Airbus A380-861 A6-EDJ (msn 009) of Emirates arrives at London (Heathrow).

 

Alliance Airlines to operate QANTAS Link services on the Brisbane-Emerald route starting on June 4

Alliance Airlines (Brisbane) will start operating Fokker 100s as a QANTAS Link carrier on the Brisbane-Emerald route starting on June 4. So far, no Alliance Fokker F.28 Mk. 0100s have been repainted into QANTAS colors.

QANTAS issued the following statement:

“QANTAS Link has announced it will introduce Fokker F100* jet services between Brisbane and Emerald from June 4, 2012. These new jet services will support Q400 services on the route whilst also providing cascaded growth across several key Queensland markets including Roma and Bundaberg.

Alongside the introduction of 19 F100 jet services, QANTAS Link will also add four extra flights between Brisbane and Emerald taking the total number of return services on the route to 45 per week.

Additional Q400 aircraft services will benefit several key markets as follows:

– Increased flights between Brisbane and Roma with four additional services introduced to provide over 290 new seats per week.
– Customers travelling between Brisbane and Bundaberg will have access to an extra 392 seats per week.
– Customers travelling to and from Newcastle, Hervey Bay and Biloela will also benefit from extra seats becoming available on these markets.

*F100 services between Emerald and Brisbane will be operated on behalf of QantasLink by Alliance Airlines.”

Copyright Photo: Peter Gates.

Alliance Slide Show: CLICK HERE

Alliance Airlines to expand its Adelaide maintenance base

Alliance Airlines (Brisbane) is planning to expand its Adelaide operations, expanding a second maintenance base according to this report by Flightcentric.

Adelaide is already being used by the airline for line maintenance and heavy maintenance for its Fokker 50s. Alliance will now broaden its activities at Adelaide to include major maintenance for Fokker 100s and the newly-acquired Fokker 70s.

Read the full report: CLICK HERE

Alliance Slide Show: CLICK HERE

Copyright Photo: Peter Gates. Please click on the photo for additional details.

Alliance Airlines to add eight more Fokker F.28 Mk. 0100s

Please click on the AG icon for a direct link to the Alliance photo gallery.

Alliance Airlines (Brisbane) plans to buy an additional eight Fokker F.28 Mk. 0100s (Fokker 100s) in order to expand its operations according to Flightglobal. The company signed a letter of intent (LOI) with an unnamed European vendor for the 100-seat aircraft, which will be delivered progressively from May. When the deliveries are completed, Alliance will have a fleet of 19 Fokker F.28 Mk. 100s and six Fokker F.27 Mk. 50s.

Read the full report:

www.flightglobal.com/articles/2010/03/24/339835/australias-alliance-airlines-inks-deal-for-eight-fokker.html