Tag Archives: Tyrolean Airways

Austrian Airlines operates the last turboprop flight, retires the last DHC-8-402 (Q400)

Austrian Airlines Bombardier DHC-8-402 (Q400) OE-LGI (msn 4100)  ZRH (Paul Bannwarth). Image: 922914.

Austrian Airlines on May 31, 2021 operated the last Bombardier DHC-8-402 (Q400) turboprop flight from Innsbruck to Vienna.

Austrian Airlines made this announcement:

• The last turboprop flight was the OS 905/6 from Vienna to Innsbruck and back
• Dash aircraft were an integral part of Austrian aviation for over 40 years
• “The Dash is and will remain part of our history”, says Austrian Airlines COO Francesco Sciortino

It is the end of an impressive era. On May 31, 2021 Austrian Airlines operated a passenger flight with a turboprop aircraft for the last time. The Dash 8-Q400 with the registration OE-LGI flew as OS 905/6 from Vienna to Innsbruck and back. After more than 40 years, this marks the end of the Dash’s time in Austria. The future Austrian Airlines fleet will consist entirely of Airbus, Boeing and Embraer aircraft.

“The Dash has had an impressive career in our company, it is and will remain part of our history. We will not forget that. I would like to thank everyone who has served the Dash aircraft over the past decades, from the cabin and cockpit crews, to the technician team and many more”, says Austrian Airlines COO Francesco Sciortino.

“At peak times, the Dash 8-Q400 completed up to 44,000 individual flights per year”, says Austrian Airlines Dash fleet manager Thomas Bleimuth. “With this type of aircraft, it was also possible to fly to particularly demanding locations. For example, Tyrolean Airways used to fly the four-engined Dash 7 to Courchevel in the French Alps, an airfield at over 2,000 meters above sea level.”

Airline Color Scheme - Introduced 1985

Above Copyright Photo: Tyrolean Austrian Regional (Tyrolean Airways) de Havilland Canada DHC-7-102 Dash 7 OE-LLU (msn 113) INN (Jacques Guillem Collection). Image: 946654.
On April 9, 1980, the story of the Dash began not only in Austria, but all of Europe. At that time, Tyrolean Airways was the first European airline to take delivery of the first Dash 8 predecessor, a De Havilland Canada DHC-7 Dash 7. With its excellent short-landing characteristics, the 50-seat regional aircraft was ideally suited for use at difficult airports such as Innsbruck or Courchevel.

Tyrolean Airways de Havilland Canada DHC-8-311 Dash 8 OE-LTM (msn 527) ZRH (Richard Vandervord). Image: 946656.

Above Copyright Photo: Tyrolean Airways de Havilland Canada DHC-8-311 Dash 8 OE-LTM (msn 527) ZRH (Richard Vandervord). Image: 946656.

From 1985, Tyrolean Airways used the twin-engined successor model Dash 8-100 on flights to Graz, Frankfurt and Zurich. Until the complete takeover of the Tyrolean carrier by Austrian Airlines in 1998, a total of 44 different Dash 8s of the -100, -300 and -400 series flew for Tyrolean.

At Austrian Airlines, 18 Dash 8-Q400s were last in service on short-haul routes, for example on flights from Vienna to Milan, Warsaw or Zagreb. After almost 20 years of operation at Austria’s home carrier, this aircraft type alone can boast some impressive figures:

• Over 20 million passengers have flown on the Dash 8-Q400 in the last 20 years.
• The Dash 8-Q400 has flown 237 million kilometers – accident-free. That is 310 flights to the moon and back.
• Our Dash 8-Q400s have spent a combined 54 years in the air.
• During their career, the aircraft completed more than 520,000 safe landings.
• During their pre-flight checks, the Dash 8-Q400 pilots covered more than 52,000 kilometers on foot – that is 20 circumnavigations of Austria.
Videos:
Top Copyright Photo: Austrian Airlines Bombardier DHC-8-402 (Q400) OE-LGI (msn 4100) ZRH (Paul Bannwarth). Image: 922914.
Austrian Airlines aircraft slide show:

Austrian to resume Manchester service

Austrian Airlines (Vienna) will resume daily Vienna – Manchester Fokker 100 service on September 10 per Airline Route.

Austrian (2015) logo

Copyright Photo: SPA/AirlinersGallery.com. Previously operated by Tyrolean Airways as Austrian arrows, all Fokker 100s are now operated by a combined and new Austrian Airlines. Tyrolean Airways was quietly closed down on March 31, 2015. Fokker F.28 Mk. 0100 (Fokker 100) OE-LVI (msn 11468) departs from London (Heathrow).

Austrian Airlines aircraft slide show: AG Airline Slide Show

Austrian-Tyrolean aircraft slide show: AG Airline Slide Show

Austrian Airlines finally finds labor peace with its pilots and cabin staff, flight operations to return to Austrian on March 1, 2015

Austrian Airlines‘ (Vienna) flights and aircraft (except one Boeing 777) are currently operated by Tyrolean Airways and its staff. Representatives of the pilots, flight attendants and management of Tyrolean Airways (Austrian Airlines Group) agreed on a new collective wage agreement effective December 1, 2014. The new contract will allow flight operations to once again be transferred back to Austrian Airlines on March 1, 2015. The company issued this statement:

Following a new and intense round of negotiations, the management and Works Council for the flight and cabin crew of Tyrolean Airways agreed last night on the cornerstones of a new Group collective wage agreement for the approximately 3,200 members of the flight staff. A framework agreement to this effect was already signed by the social partners. The Supervisory Board of Austrian Airlines also gave its stamp of approval to the proposal solution.

“I am relieved. The agreement is the best of all the options open to Austrian Airlines. We managed just in time to prevent the possible reorganization of the airline”, says Austrian Airlines CEO Jaan Albrecht. “The negotiating partners demonstrated a sense of responsibility. I pay tribute to them.”

The framework agreement serves as the basis for a new Group collective wage agreement which will be drafted in detail and already apply to the approximately 900 pilots and 2,300 flight attendants as of December 1, 2014. The agreement regulates future salaries and retirement benefits, working time and career development for the cockpit and cabin crew. The parties to the negotiations agreed not to disclose any details about the agreement.

“It was very difficult to find a viable solution. However, ultimately the shared desire helped us achieve our goal“, says Klaus Froese, Managing Director of Tyrolean Airways and chief negotiator on the employer’s side. “On the basis of the agreement that has been reached, especially thanks to the targeted legal certainty, we have now laid the foundations for the good development of our company.”

A key aspect of the negotiated solution is also the transfer of flight operations to Austrian Airlines effective March 1, 2015. In this connection special severance payments were agreed upon.

“Due to the agreement we now have a new starting point for a new, unified Austrian Airlines – flown by Austrian, operated by Austrian. We can now concentrate on designing the future. This includes the modernization of the fleet“, Jaan Albrecht adds.

Austrian Airlines employs a total staff of 6,300 employees. The fleet is comprised of 78 aircraft, which fly to about 130 destinations from its home airport in Vienna.

Copyright Photo: SPA/AirlinersGallery.com. Austrian Airlines’ (operated by Tyrolean Airways) Boeing 737-6Z9 WL OE-LNM (msn 30138) arrives at London (Heathrow).

Austrian Airlines: AG Slide Show

Tyrolean Airways to operate a Bombardier Q400 for Swiss for the domestic Zurich-Lugano route

Austrian Airlines (Vienna) took delivery of its 15th Bombardier DHC-8-402 (OE-LGO, msn 4281) on July 21. The turboprop is operated by lower-cost Tyrolean Airways under the Tyrolean AOC and the Austrian brand.

The group has announced it will operate the type on a wet lease basis for fellow Lufthansa Group carrier Swiss International Air Lines (Zurich) on a Swiss domestic route starting on November 1 between the Swiss hub at Zurich and Lugano. In the future, four flights each day will be operated on this route. By deploying the larger aircraft, Swiss will be able to increase its capacity on the route by 50 percent.

With the arrival of OE-LGO, the fleet of the Austrian Airlines Group will reach a total of 76 aircraft. All but one Austrian-titled aircraft is operated by Tyrolean Airways.

Copyright Photo: Paul Bannwarth/AirlinersGallery.com. Sister-ship Bombardier DHC-8-402 (marketed as the Q400) OE-LGD (msn 4027) lands at Basel/Mulhouse/Freiburg (BSL).

Austrian Airlines: AG Slide Show

No labor peace at Austrian Airlines-Tyrolean Airways and also no contract and no merger due to tense labor negotiations

Austrian Airlines (Vienna) and Tyrolean Airways (Innsbruck and Vienna) have met with stiff resistance and a possible strike from its unions on its recent proposals for a new contract and hopefully some labor peace. As a result, Tyrolean Airways has now withdrawn its offer for a new contract as previously reported. In addition, Tyrolean Airways will not be merged into Austrian Airlines. Lower cost Tyrolean Airways currently operates all aircraft (except one Boeing 777-200) for Austrian Airlines under the Austrian brand. The company has also decided not to pursue a replacement program for the Fokker jet aircraft due to this uncertain labor environment. The group issued this statement:

• Threat of industrial action or even a strike met with incomprehension
• Works Council considers the old collective wage agreement to be the basis for negotiations
• “Old collective wage agreement would lead into an economic dead end”

After ten months of negotiations the management of Tyrolean Airways has withdrawn its offer for a new Group collective wage agreement. Last Monday the Works Council responded to the presented offer by holding a general staff meeting and threatening industrial actions or even a strike – a total of 34 flights had to be cancelled, and almost 3,000 passengers were affected by the disruption of normal flight operations.

Moreover, at the first round of negotiations following the announcement of the offer, Karl Minhard, Chairman of the Works Council for the flight and cabin crew, declared that from his point of view the basis for negotiations is still the original collective wage agreement applying to the former flight staff of Austrian Airlines. In January, both parties had still defined the goal of reaching an agreement by May 31, 2014.

“We would not manage to achieve this under the prevailing circumstances, neither with respect to the timing or the contents”, says Klaus Froese, Managing Director of Tyrolean Airways. “The past cannot be the answer to an economically challenging future. The old collective wage agreement would lead us straight into an economic dead end”, he adds. As a reminder: for six consecutive years Austrian Airlines operated in the red. As of 2013 the company was again in the black, as a result of strict cost management and after the termination of the old collective wage agreement.

After consulting with the Executive Board of Austrian Airlines, the management of Tyrolean Airways decided to take the proposed solution off the agenda. “We have to remain punctual and reliable, especially when people are planning their summer vacations. Flight disruptions and cancellations are not acceptable for our customers”, Froese adds.

Thereby, for the time being, also the offer of merging Tyrolean Airways and Austrian Airlines is no longer under discussion. The management of Austrian Airlines does not believe it is an opportune time to make the potential investments of up to EUR 1 billion to replace the Fokker aircraft and expand long haul routes. This is because the former collective wage agreement does not provide a sound basis for such investments.

“We will now deliberate which options we have. Naturally my door remains open for serious negotiations about an economically viable Austrian Airlines”, Froese emphasizes.

The management remains confident with respect to the lawsuits filed by the trade union and the Works Council. The transfer of flight operations to Tyrolean was economically essential and also legally permissible.

Copyright Photo: TMK Photography/AirlinersGallery.com. The Fokker 70s and 100s operated by Tyrolean Airways are not likely to replaced any time soon with this uncertainty. Fokker F.28 Mk. 0100 (Fokker 100) OE-LVC (msn 11446) arrives in Amsterdam.

Austrian Airlines: AG Slide Show

 

Austrian Airlines wants labor peace, proposes a new collective agreement offer, opens up the possibility of merging Austrian with subsidiary Tyrolean Airways

Austrian Airlines (Vienna) and its subsidiary Tyrolean Airways (Innsbruck) have presented to its employees a “framework plan for a collective wage agreement applying to flight personnel throughout the entire Austrian Airlines Group. Following the failed negotiations in 2012, the entire flight operations of Austrian Airlines were transferred to its subsidiary Tyrolean Airways, encompassing about 1,900 employees and all the aircraft. Now the company is making employees a new offer i.e. a new Austrian Airlines Group collective wage agreement as a means of increasing planning certainty and creating the basis for future decisions. Negotiations designed to work out specific details should be concluded by May 31, 2014. This collective wage agreement opens up the possibility to merge Tyrolean Airways and Austrian Airlines in the future.”

The company continued:

“The contents of the offer are based on ten months of joint negotiations with the Works Council, trade union and Austrian Federal Economic Chamber. The new agreement acts as a bridgehead from the past aiming to lead Austrian Airlines into the future. Our employees wish for an agreement and a clear perspective moving forward. They also desire to return to Austrian Airlines. We want to make this possible”, says Austrian Airlines CEO Jaan Albrecht.

The cornerstones of the new Group collective wage agreement:

The cornerstones of the new Group collective wage agreement are new flight duty rules, a new salary scale, a profit sharing scheme based on the net profit, a revised pension fund model as well as a new career model for the cabin and cockpit staff.

The current flight duty rules are based on the former collective bargaining agreement applying to Tyrolean Airlines. The new stipulations more effectively takes into consideration the demands involved in operating a long-haul fleet. In contrast to the rejected negotiated settlement concluded in 2012, the salaries of the senior staff members formerly with Austrian Airlines will not be reduced but will stay frozen at their current status until the new salary scale catches up to this level. A profit sharing scheme for employees based on the company’s net profit is also a new component of the agreement. Austrian Airlines has been operating profitably again since 2013 and will enable its employees to participate in its business success.

Another key feature of the new collective wage agreement is a revised pension fund model. Partial payments will be offered to those employees who were previously covered by the Austrian Airlines company pension plan. Depending on the length of service and the respective position, this ranges from about EUR 15,000 for flight attendants to EUR 305,000 for flight captains. A new career model for the cabin crew and cockpit staff, which also facilitates the transfer between the various staff groups, is also part of the offering.

“The most difficult task was developing a new career model. Other airlines have failed precisely for this reason”, states Klaus Froese, Managing Director of Tyrolean Airways. “The centerpiece of our model is a transparent and fair allocation formula for pilots of the regional fleet and pilots of larger types of aircraft to be appointed to vacant plane captain jobs”, he adds.

Stability and planning certainty for employees and the company:

“We want to offer our employees an improved basis for their own personal career planning. I believe that this package of measures provides a good opportunity for this. Today I have asked the employees to authorize their representatives to carry out negotiations on this”, Froese continues.

Last week the negotiating team presented the principal features of the new collective wage agreement to the Works Council for flight and cabin crew (Betriebsrat Bord) of Tyrolean Airways, the Austrian Federal Economic Chamber and the trade union. Now negotiations are to be conducted on specific details of the agreement provided that the Works Council is willing to do so. “I think that we have reached a balanced agreement as the basis for negotiations. Now it is all about getting down to specifics”, Froese says. “However, we have to come to a conclusion after ten months of negotiations. The employees want a solution to be reached, and the company must be able to plan ahead.”

If an agreement can be reached with the Works Council, this would mean much more to the employees than just working in accordance with a collective wage agreement. A collective agreement for the entire Austrian Airlines Group would serve as the basis for a merger of Tyrolean Airways and Austrian Airlines. For the customers, the bottom line is that there would only be one brand. “Flown by Austrian, operated by Austrian“, is the way Froese describes it.

Basis for development of the fleet:

“The restructuring measures implemented over the past few years have put Austrian Airlines in a better financial position. We are once again operating profitably and want to take the next steps into the future. We have Lufthansa’s support for this”, explains Austrian Airlines CEO Jaan Albrecht.

“This year Austrian Airlines will make a forward-looking decision and move ahead with ordering a successor model to its fleet of Fokker aircraft. However, such a significant investment decision cannot be made without a consensus being reached on a collective wage agreement”, Albrecht continues.

At the present time the Austrian Airlines Group has a work force of about 6,300 employees, of which about 3,100 employees comprise the cockpit and cabin staff. A new collective agreement with the ground staff was concluded last year with the help of the trade union and the Works Council.

 

Copyright Photo: Ken Petersen/AirlinersGallery.com. Tyrolean Airways now operates all Austrian Airlines-titled aircraft except one Boeing 777-200 which Austrian officially maintains on its AOC to keep it active. It is very challenging for both Austrian Airlines and its employees to operate an international airline on a regional airline contract. Operated by Tyrolean Airways-employed flight crews, Boeing 777-2B8 ER OE-LPD (msn 35960) completes its final approach to the runway at John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK) in New York.

Austrian Airlines: AG Slide Show

Austrian Airlines to return to Tehran on March 11

Austrian Airlines (Vienna) will relaunch its services to the Iranian capital, Tehran, from March 11, 2014 onwards, depending on the final regulatory approval. The flights will be operated five times a week for the duration of the company’s summer schedule, using an Airbus A320 or A319 operating with the flight numbers of OS 871/2. The service will be bookable from January 15, 2014 onwards. Austrian served the capital of Iran since 1984.

Austrian Airlines dropped all flights to Tehran from its schedule in January 2013 for commercial reasons.

The following flight times will apply from 11 March 2014 onwards (local time):
OS871 Vienna – Tehran 20.10 – 03.00 +1

OS872 Tehran – Vienna 03.55 – 06.00

Copyright Photo: Paul Bannwarth/AirlinersGallery.com. Airbus A320-214 OE-LBX (msn 1735), now operated by Tyroelan Airways (with small titles), prepares to land in Zurich in the Star Alliance motif.

Austrian Airlines: AG Slide Show

Austrian Airlines to fly to Ibiza next summer, hopes to end the year with an operating profit

Austrian Airlines (Vienna) starting on June 1, 2014, it will be offering one flight a week to the Balearic island of Ibiza. Having already added Palma de Mallorca to its ‘Austrian myHoliday’ flight program in summer 2013, the domestic carrier is now set to incorporate another Spanish destination into its program of charter flights. Austrian will be offering 20 nonstop flights a week to Spain next summer.

Vienna – Ibiza     Flight days    Departure     Arrival
OS9511             Sunday        6.30 a.m.     9.00 a.m.
Ibiza – Vienna
OS9512             Sunday        9.45 a.m.     12.15 p.m.

New from next July: summer service to Malé and more flights to Delhi.

Austrian continues to expand its tourism product under the Austrian myHoliday program. From July 1 next year, the domestic carrier will be offering one flight a week to Malé, capital of the Maldives, in a new drive to incorporate the idyllic Indian Ocean destination into its summer schedule. Until now, Austrian Airlines has only offered the route in its winter schedule. The Austrian service to Delhi will also increase by one extra flight from next summer onwards, and the company will fly to the Indian metropolis seven times a week as a result.

On the financial side, Austrian issued this statement:

Austrian Airlines has clearly improved the operating profit in the first nine months of the year (before one-time effects) by €10.3 million to €19.4 million. This increase was primarily achieved on the cost side and also includes savings from the merger of the flight operations of Tyrolean and Austrian. In total, €220 million in gross profit improvements were sustainably raised in the first year of the restructuring program.

Austrian Airlines CEO Jaan Albrecht: “Austrian Airlines is well on track. The restructuring phase will be followed by the planned development of the intercontinental business.”

Synergies from the merger of the engineering and flight operations administration as well as the expansion of long-haul routes should deliver an additional €40 million improvement in gross profit in years 2 and 3. The expansion phase also includes the appointment of around 230 new flight attendants with the operation of an additional long-haul aircraft starting in summer 2014. Recruitment of the staff has already commenced.

In contrast, further savings are being made in the area of administration: The merger of the engineering and flight operations administration of Tyrolean Airways and Austrian Airlines should be completed in 2014 and, as already announced last year, result in a reduction of up to 150 positions. The merger of flight operations and administration has seen the removal of four areas, including the duplicated areas of Cabin, Cockpit, Flight Ops Administration and Head Office Administration at Tyrolean and Austrian.

The merger also includes combining the air traffic control centers at the two locations in Innsbruck and at the hub in Vienna. In the area of technical maintenance, the so-called “Part M” or support functions, such as engineering, planning and control, will be combined in Vienna. Technical maintenance of the fleets will continue to be performed at different locations. The maintenance of the Bombardier Dash 8 aircraft will be performed in Innsbruck, the Airbus and Boeing aircraft will be maintained in Vienna, and Bratislava is the location for the overhaul of the Fokker fleet.

Jaan Albrecht: “Unfortunately, we don’t have any choice. We must make our organization more efficient and remove duplications across the Group – above all the organizational duplications that have existed for years.”

The result as at 30 September 2013 in detail:

Operational expenditure was reduced in the first nine months of the year by €74 million or 4.3 percent from €1,722 million to €1,648 million.

Total operational revenue fell in the first nine months of 2013 by 3.7 percent to €1,667 million (2012: €1,731 million). The operating profit as at September 30, 2013 amounted to €19.4 million. In the previous year, the transfer of flight operations to Tyrolean Airways significantly increased the profit by €67.5 million. The subsequent application of the new accounting standards IAS 19R increased this one-off effect by an additional €134.4 million (see table of figures for details).

Fewer aircraft in service, but better load factors

Austrian Airlines carried 8.6 million passengers in the first nine months of 2013. This corresponds to a slight reduction of 1.8 percent compared to the previous year. The reason: Austrian has removed four aircraft from its medium-haul fleet. In addition, up to two fewer long-haul aircraft were deployed due to the retrofit of the cabins.

Capacity expressed in available seat kilometers (ASK) was reduced by 4.5 percent. However, Austrian Airlines improved its load factor to 78.8 percent (2012: 77.7 percent). In total, Austrian operated 102,768 flights in the first three quarters of the current year, or 376 flights a day on average.

The headcount of the Austrian Airlines Group including its fully consolidated subsidiaries was 6,222 employees on the reporting date of September 30, 2013 (30 September 2012: 6,320 employees).

Austrian Airlines continues to achieve excellent figures in terms of reliability and punctuality. With a departure punctuality rate of 88.6 percent, Austrian Airlines’ figures continued to be better than the European average. Regularity stood at 98.9 percent. This makes Austrian Airlines one of the most punctual and reliable airlines in the world.

Expansion of intercontinental business planned

The schedule to North America will be significantly expanded overall: From  July 1, the new Boeing 777-200 ER will fly daily to Washington, adding around 90 seats per flight to the seat capacity. Depending on the configuration, the Boeing 777-200 ER offers space for about 310 passengers, while the Boeing 767-300 ER has 220 seats. Newark, New Jersey, will also be added as a new destination. The newly introduced Vienna-Chicago O’Hare-Vienna route will be increased from five weekly to daily flights from summer 2014.

“The expansion will also have an impact on passenger numbers and the bottom line. We are expecting about 130,000 additional passengers in 2014,” says Albrecht.

Outlook: Profit in the low double-digit millions for the full year

Austria’s biggest domestic airline remains confident about the full year 2013:

“We want to end the year with an operating profit in the double-digit millions on the balance sheet, in the black, of course,” concludes Albrecht. The last time Austrian Airlines was in the black was in 2007.

Copyright Photo: Paul Bannwarth/AirlinersGallery.com. All Austrian branded aircraft are now operated by lower cost Tyrolean Airways (except one 777 to keep the Austrian AOA alive). Tyrolean Airways’ Fokker F.28 Mk. 0070 OE-LFG (msn 11549) now with just Austrian titles (it was formerly Austrian arrows) lands at EuroAirport serving the Basel/Mulhouse/Freiburg area.

Austrian Airlines: AG Slide Show

Lufthansa’s transfer of Austrian Airlines employees to cheaper Tyrolean Airways deemed illegal by a Vienna court

Lufthansa Group (Frankfurt) in 2012 orchestrated the transfer of around 2,000 staff members of its Austrian Airlines (Vienna) subsidiary to the cheaper Tyrolean Airways (Innsbruck) subsidiary to reduce overall costs. A Vienna court ruled yesterday (September 2) that the move was illegal and the employees were still employed by Austrian Airlines.

Austrian Airlines stated it would appeal the verdict of the Vienna Labor and Social Affairs Court. The transfer was the heart of the loss-making airline’s restructuring plan and its attempt to return to profitability along with the Lufthansa Group.

Currently Tyrolean Airways is operating all Austrian Airlines-branded aircraft (except one Boeing 777) as Austrian Airlines flights. The one Triple Seven is keeping the Austrian Airlines AOC alive.

Read the full report from Euronews: CLICK HERE

Copyright Photo: Austrian Airlines-branded Boeing 777-2Z9 ER OE-LPA (msn 28698) pictured departing from Tokyo (Narita) is actually being operated Tyrolean Airways-employed crews on the Tyrolean AOC until the Vienna court deemed the crews to be considered Austrian Airlines employees again! What will now happen to the Tyrolean crews who were operating alongside Austrian crews?

Austrian Airlines: AG Slide Show

Austrian Airlines/Tyrolean Airways retires the last Boeing 737 on April 2

Austrian Airlines (operated by Tyrolean Airways) (Vienna) retired its last Boeing 737 with the last flight being operated with Lauda Air (Vienna) Boeing 737-8Z9 OE-LNK (msn 28178). This also retires the Lauda brand although Lauda was officially merged into Austrian on July 1, 2012.

The company issued this statement:

The final Boeing 737 in the Tyrolean Airways fleet celebrated its departure on April 2. The aircraft, which bears the registration OE-LNK, is the last to bear the Lauda Air design. This means the fleet harmonization, during which eleven Boeing 737 aircraft have been replaced with seven Airbus A320 over the last seven months, is now complete. Tyrolean Airways now has a unified fleet on its medium-haul routes, consisting of 29 aircraft of the Airbus A320 fleet family. The company Lauda Air was merged with Austrian Airlines already last year. In the private travel segment, the power of the Austrian brand has been used to greater effect both nationally and internationally since the beginning of this year, with the launch of the ‘my Holiday’ product.

“This is an important milestone for our future competitiveness,” declared Austrian CEO Jaan Albrecht. “The fleet harmonization is an essential building block in the restructuring program of the Austrian Airlines Group.” Thanks to the unified fleet on medium-haul routes, Tyrolean Airways can enhance a number of essential synergies. Double costs for maintenance and spare parts are no longer necessary, for example, training for pilots can be standardised, and the aircraft can be deployed more productively in the network schedule. This all results in savings of around
17 million euros.

Airbus on medium-haul routes

There were a variety of different reasons for the decision to opt for Airbus on medium-haul during the fleet harmonization. The Austrian Airlines Group had twice as many Airbus A320 in its fleet as it did Boeing 737. This meant the phasing out of the Boeing 737 involved lower costs, because fewer pilots and technicians needed to be retrained.

In addition to this, the Austrian Airlines Group already had larger sub-fleets within the Airbus A320 fleet, which could be operated more efficiently than the Boeing 737 sub-fleets. As well as this, the Austrian Airlines Group can benefit more from synergies within the Lufthansa Group by using the A320 on its medium-haul routes.

Dates, facts and the history of the Boeing 737 in the Austrian Airlines Group The first Boeing 737-200, registration OE-ILE, took to the air for Lauda Air in the autumn on 1985. In the years that followed, Lauda Air incorporated a succession of Boeing 737 aircraft into its fleet, but each in different versions. After the takeover of Lauda Air, Austrian Airlines had a total of eleven Boeing 737 “Next Generation” and one Boeing 737-400 “Classic” in its fleet. The final Boeing 737-400 “Classic” was phased out of the fleet in 2004.
The Boeing 737 was mainly used to carry charter traffic at Lauda Air and Austrian. Since the spring of 2010, it has also been used on scheduled routes of Austrian Airlines. To make this possible, the Boeing 737 was repainted in the Austrian colors. Just one Boeing 737-800, bearing the registration OE-LNK, continued to fly under the Lauda Air colors, to enable the company to retain its AOC, or “Air Operator Certificate”.

The Boeing 737 “Next Generation” used at Lauda Air and Austrian Airlines flew over 300,000 flight hours in total between 1998 and 2013. The Boeing 737 was used for around 8 flight hours every day in the Austrian Airlines Group. That corresponds to 4.5 landings a day.

Before the fleet harmonization, the Austrian Airlines Group had seven Boeing 737-800s, two Boeing 737-600s and two Boeing 737-700s in its fleet.

Overview of the fleet of the Austrian Airlines Group :

The Austrian Airlines Group currently has 74 aircraft in its operative fleet (all except one operated by Tyrolean):

• Long-haul:

4 Boeing 777-200 (one operated by Austrian)
6 Boeing 767-300

• Short- and medium-haul:

6 Airbus A321
16 Airbus A320
7 Airbus A319
14 Fokker 100
9 Fokker 70
12 DHC-8-400

Copyright Photo: Andi Hiltl. Pictured at Zurich, Boeing 737-8Z9 WL OE-LNK (msn 28178) wore the Lauda colors until the end.

Austrian: AG Slide Show

Lauda: AG Slide Show